The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

20110320 Akiko’s Japanese White Loaf Leavened by Wild Fruit Yeasts

Yippee's picture
Yippee

20110320 Akiko’s Japanese White Loaf Leavened by Wild Fruit Yeasts

Under the ‘pressure’ from Akiko – “…tell me how it turns out, even if you are NOT SUCCESSFUL. Please tell me the truth…,” I handled this bake with intense focus as if I were sitting for an important academic examination. I even violated the baking curfew I had vowed to administer. But I can tell you now, I’ve had no regrets doing so, even though the after-effects of sleep deprivation made me walk around like a zombie the following two days.


Japanese style sandwich bread is nothing new to me. I had made numerous loaves of them when I started out baking bread two years ago. However, there was a new element in this bake – wild fruit leavens, which I’ve watched with great interests but have never taken the initiative to further experiment. Akiko’s informative post and beautiful bread have given me the push I needed. She has opened the door of opportunity for me to experience a new dimension of bread baking. Thank you, Akiko!


 


I followed Akiko’s formula and instruction closely with one exception: weight of the final dough was reduced for my smaller Pullman pan.


 


Here are some pictures of this 'new', wild yeasts leavened bread:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/58821372@N05/sets/72157626338061266/show/


 


A similiar type of bread I  made before with commercial yeast:  


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/11745/recipe-japanese-style-sandwich-bread-water-roux-starter-sponge


 

Comments

Syd's picture
Syd

Lovely, Yippee!  It looks soft and inviting.   I missed that post of Akiko's but have glanced every now and then at the fruit leaven posts.  I have been so wrapped up in my own baking projects I haven't seriously considered trying them.  Now you have inspired me to try them.  Have no idea how I am even going to make a dent in all the baking projects I have in mind. :)


Thanks,


Syd

Yippee's picture
Yippee

It's fun!

Yippee

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Your bread photos are stunningly beautiful. Such a gelatinous crumb on a close cell sandwich loaf is quite remarkable. Well done.


Eric

Yippee's picture
Yippee

I have to convince my hubby that I'm not a complete photo dummy. Besides, it's fun to push the limits of a point-shoot to see how far it can go.

Yippee

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Wow -  looks great Yippee!! Daisy_A

Yippee's picture
Yippee

I'm officially one of the yeast water people now!

Yippee

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Daisy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Sorry to late to come here to say " GREAT JOB, Yippee!"


It is really a great looking loaf, Yippee!   Your raisin yeast will be more powerful when you refresh again and again, and the crumb will also change to tight crumb like mine. I remember that the my first loaf with yeast water had more air in the bread. Your loaf is much better than my first loaf. It is really great, Yippee :)   I will post the goma bread ( sesami) soon  from the book that I posted on " The amazing airy baguette"  It is my favorite loaf, too.  


Your post made made smile, Yippee..  Thank you!!


Akiko

Yippee's picture
Yippee

It's good to 'see' it on you, especially after all the things happening recently.

Best Wishes,

Yippee

P.S. Akiko, what do you do with all the raisins in the jar? Can they still be used in bread?

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi, Yippee


Sometimes I use the raisin in the dough, too. It taste good, too.  I make bagels and English muffins to add the alcohoric raisins. My family likes those.  I am still studing the formulas.


I also eat them :) and I used some of them to make a panettone using Daisy-A's that is superb.


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/21104/my-first-panettone-milanese-notes-trial-run-formula-and-method-thanks-all-advice


I  soak them with a lot of sugar to make rum and keep it in a refrigerator.


* I don't think it is a good idea to use several days alcoric raisins to make rum or use to make bread. I always use the alhoric raisins are only 1 day old.


 


Goma ( Sesami ) loaf:


 I forgot to take a picture of the crumb.. This crumb was frozen...  It doesn't look good, but it really tastes delicious.


Ingredients


Bread flour  380g


Levain  103g  52.5g AP/ 52.5g Raisin yeast water


Sugar 13g


Water 209g


Oil ( 太白sesami oil  or vegetable oi) 11g


Salt  6.8g


--------------------


Method:


1. Levain rest for overnight 12hours  at roomtemp


2. Mix the all the ingredients except the salt  -- Autolize for 30 minutes


3. Bulk fermentation  7 hours  at 24℃ until doubled


4. Punch down


5. Bulk fermentation again until tripled. ( I took 1.5 hours) 


6. Divide and Preshape -- Bench time   *  When you divide 3 pieces  dough, you better make one dough is little less than the other 2 dough. the less dough will be placed in the middle to rise even.


7. Shape


8. Proof  at 24℃( I took 2 hours until the dough rose 1cm lower to the top of the tin)


9. Bake preheated 450F.  Bake it with steam ( I used sylvia's steaming towels method) for 5 mintues   Take the towels out of the oven then decreased down to 410F and bake more 30 minutes.


-----------------------


* The method from the book:


 Bulk fermentation 10-10.5 hours at 22-25℃-- Punch down and divide and preshape-- bench time 30 mintues-- shape


Proof  90-100 minutes at 33℃


Bake : She uses cold start that she put the dough in the cold oven ( it is not preheated). Spray some water around the top of the tin. Bake  20 minutes at 140℃, increase the temperature at 200-210℃ for 25 minutes.  For gas ovens:( The gas oven will be hotter quickly then the electric's) starting to bake at 100℃ for 10 minutes and increase the temperature 150℃ for another 10 minutes, and increase the temperature 200-210℃ and bake more 25 minutes.


 I have not tried the baking method yet.. I better try it. She said that it will rise more in a oven than normal method of baking.


Happy baking,


Akiko

Yippee's picture
Yippee

For your reply and sharing anther interesting formula! This one takes a lot longer during bulk, I bet it has something to do with the % of pre-fermented flour. Don't you think so?

Do you see any particular difference in the loaf when steam is used?

Thanks again, this is fun!

Yippee

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi, Yippee


You are right. Because the goma bread's levain is only 27% as to the final bread flour(100%).  My white sandwich loaf levain is 85% as to the final bread flour.  Next time, I will make the goma bread just before going to the bed. ( No 2 time bulkfermentation)  It has been so difficult to make the goma loaf because of the time schedule.


I am studying it using the different steaming method.. I thought it will rise more in the oven if I use a lot of steam.. But I don't see the difference clearly... TO see the difference, I should make 2 loaves to compare... hmmmm...


By the way,  Here is the another loaf formula from the book ( Goma bread)


Bread flour 100%  300g


Levain  27% 81g ( 40.5g raisin yeast water / 40.5g AP)


Sugar 3.5% 10.5g


Water 54%  162g


Flour for dusting/ Oil for the tin loaf


1. Levain  12 hours


2. Mixing ( She doesn't use Autolyze)


3. Bulkfermentation 22-25c   10-10.5 hours


4. Divide and Bench time 20-30 minutes


5.Shape


6.Proof 33c 70-80minutes


7.Bake  Spray water around the tin 4-5 times, then bake ( she uses the cold start)


Akiko


Your welcome, Yippee.

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Akiko:

I don't see it in the formula. And what difference does it make when shaping into 3 pcs instead of 2? More even heating? Thanks.

Yippee

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Yippee,


 It just looks different :)   I like to try new things...


Akiko

teketeke's picture
teketeke

I also use the raisin yeast water as sherry wine and Mirin ( Japanese sweet wine)for cooking. It works great. :)


Akiko

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Would it impart any color in the food? I'm wondering if it would ruin the beautiful color of my tomago.

Yippee

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Do you mean that the black sesami seeds changes the color of the loaf?


Little bit grayish.. just little.. But it tastes good though.


 


Or, You are talking about the dough with alcohoric raisins?  It is really tasty. I have made a lot  of them with the alcohoric raisins.  Some Japanese home bakers use the alcohoric raisins in the dough, too.  Like this:


http://cookpad.com/recipe/582344


I show you my English muffins with alcohoric raisins.



I smash the levain using a food processor before mixing. 


 


Akiko

RonRay's picture
RonRay


Welcome to the Yeast Water alternative. I now make at least half of my breads with Apple Yeast Water, too, and the other half with Sourdough.


Ron


 

Yippee's picture
Yippee

I'm a little late to the party but, hey, better late than never.

Yippee

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi, Ron


I know your seeds loaves looking great!  


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22542/noknead-multigrain-seed-and-nut-loaf


 


 I also love your sourdough crackers, however I use my raisin yeast for it.


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22562/sourdough-crackers


Best wishes,


Akiko

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi, Yippee


I updated the goma loaf here.


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23006/goma-shokupan-sesami-loaf


Best wishes,


Akiko

Yippee's picture
Yippee

I'll give it a try, probably after Spring Break.

Yippee