The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Feeding Sherman's Planet

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proth5's picture
proth5

Feeding Sherman's Planet

 


Once again Captain Kirk has saved the Federation.  A new shipment of quadrotriticale will be delivered to  Sherman's Planet.  But how are they to eat it?  Yes, it can be cooked liked rice or flaked and cooked into porridge.  But what if the good people of Sherman's Planet want sammiches?  What are they to do?


In the spirit of "never give up - never surrender" (uh - a different space epic) I am determined to create a formula to bake triticale bread. Thinking over the dense but tender crumb of an earlier try and determined to apply things that I have learned about dealing with less than "perfect" wheat varieties, I formulated a plan.  I was thinking a mildly enriched bread baked in a pan.  The Bob's Red Mill folks suggested treating the dough like wheat dough except letting it rise only once, shape, proof and bake.  I remembered that the dough really behaved like a rye dough and pondered that I should not do the first rise, but considered that the miller should know.


The formula is as follows:


 

Total Dough Ingredients

 

 

Percent of Flour in Levain

0.3

 

Final Dough

 

 

 

%

Wt

UOM

%

WT

UOM

Ingredients

Wt

UOM

Total Flour

100%

18

oz

100%

5.4

oz

Total Flour

12.6

oz

Triticale Flour

100%

18

 

100%

5.4

oz

Triticale Flour

12.6

 

Water

62%

11.16

 

60%

3.24

oz

Water

7.92

oz

Shortening(leaf lard)

4%

0.72

oz

 

 

 

Shortening(leaf lard)

0.72

oz

Agave Nectar

11%

2.016

oz

 

 

 

Agave Nectar

2.016

oz

Milk Powder

4%

0.72

oz

 

 

 

Milk Powder

0.72

oz

Salt

3%

0.504

oz

 

 

 

Salt

0.504

oz

Yeast

1%

0.216

oz

 

 

 

Yeast

0.216

oz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seed

1%

0.144

oz

3%

0.144

oz

Levain

8.784

oz

Totals

186%

33.48

oz

163%

8.784

oz

 

33.48

 

 

Total Dough Ingredients

 

 

Percent of Flour in Levain

0.3

 

Final Dough

 

 

 

As you can see from the formula, I decided to preferment what is, for me, a very high percentage of the total flour in a firm levain.  I chose a levain so that the higher acid would bring some strength to the dough and a firm preferment, again, to bring strength rather than extensibility.

I also loaded the dough up with yeast, so that I would get as rapid a rise as possible.  I would depend on the pre ferment for flavor.

I milled the triticale to a fine, whole grain flour in three passes on the Diamant.

I mixed the pre ferment by hand and allowed it to mature about 10 hours.

Since this was a small batch, I pressed the mighty Kitchen Aide back into bread making service.  I am the type of person who has a sensitivity to pitch - and I will have to say that after some time with My Precioussss, the KA sounded like a little buzzing insect.  There was a time when I considered the KA to be a powerful mixer (and really, it sort of is) - what a long strange trip...

Anyway, the dough actually came together quite nicely, but always had the putty like quality of a rye. I don't particularly enjoy that feel but am starting to get used to it (I'd better - I really need to gather myself together and practice rye bread  - or bring shame upon myself later this year....)

Even with all the yeast, it took two hours of bulk ferment to get the dough to double.  Honestly, looking at the risen dough it had a nice, open quality.  For triticale, that is. 

I shaped the dough an put it into a high sided Pullman pan - brought back from Okinawa.

I allowed it to proof until double - 2 hours.  At that time the dough seemed exhausted and I popped it into a 375F oven for about 45 minutes.

As before, when I had proofed it much less (Oh, I don't write up everything I do...), the dough had zero oven spring.

What amazes me about triticale is the aroma.  The plumbing crew fixing up my bathroom plumbing kept telling me how great the house smelled.

The next day, sliced, I had reasonably sturdy bread with a sweet taste and that fine, tender triticale crumb - as pictured below.

Triticale Bread

I keep mulling over how much more open the texture was after the bulk ferment and have pretty much convinced myself that next time I will treat the dough like a rye and give more of a rest before shaping and capture all of that rise in the proof.  Rye bakers - advice welcome.

The taste - delicious.  Triticale is delicious and I don't know why it is so neglected.

The good people of Sherman's Planet will have sammiches today...

Comments

jackie9999's picture
jackie9999

And here I though the Tribbles ate all the triticale!


I'm just heading to my local 'bulk barn' and will see if they stock this new space aged wheat/rye cross. Thanks for the early morning chuckle :)

proth5's picture
proth5

died, unfortunately from eating poisoned triticale.  But they saved the folks on Sherman's Planet - and I'm sure a new shipment was procured.


Bob's Red Mill has both whole grain and ground triticale...

EvaB's picture
EvaB

its snowing again, supposed to get up to 10 inhces, its at about 4 right now, I am very tired of snow! They have flowers and are playing soccer in Vancouver! ARG!!


Maybe one should be happy that the tribbles are under control, after all flat cats could be the next invasion. (very old book of star fairing twins)


I havent' seen triticale in the store here, only at the helthfood store, and am not sure if its a full grain or a ground flour, will have to investigate. Can probably get them to order me 5 pounds or so of the grain if they have a supplier.

proth5's picture
proth5

for triticale sources.


This grain continues to fascinate me...

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven


...treat the dough like a rye and give more of a rest before shaping and capture all of that rise in the proof.  


wassisname's picture
wassisname

I went looking for some after one of your previous posts.  The local health food store has a cooler well-stocked with Bob's flours - but no triticale.  I might have asked them to order some, but was dazzled by all the other varieties and went in a different direction altogether.  Ended up with a pretty interesting loaf, all thanks to the lure of the triticale.  Someday I'll tell the tale but for now, thank you.


Marcus

proth5's picture
proth5

you are welcome...

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

http://www.aaccnet.org/cerealchemistry/backissues/1976/chem53_853.pdf


Out of Colorado...   Pat, you playing with your state grown triticale?  


When I read you let it double in the bulk rise, I cringed.  Don't know why, I've never baked with it.  But when you say it acts like rye...  maybe that is what made me cringe.  Try letting it rise only half way... if the volume is 1, then try rising of 1.5 (and not 2) before simple shaping.  (In the air with wet hands.) I would think some of the wheat characteristics would come shining through.  


Did you make a starter with triticale?  


How does it act?  


How does it compare to a rye starter?

proth5's picture
proth5

 - where the triticale is from - I got it from Bob's Red Mill, but now I will have to find out...


Thanks for the article - more good stuff than I can process right now, but I will be studying it.


The instructions that came with the grain said to treat it like wheat except not to knead it very long and let it double once before shaping it and then proof.  So I did.  And I thinks that's way wrong.


It might be awhile before I can bake triticale again, but my plan is to use a slightly larger amount of flour in the the preferment, mix, rest in a warm place for maybe half an hour, shape (I don't have too much trouble getting it shaped - it just feels wierd) and then let proof to double or slightly more.  Since it has zero oven spring now matter how long or short I proof it I figure that it will have a better crumb that way.  Agree?  I do wet my hand and smooth over the top of the dough because any little irregularities in the dough are there to stay.  I may also try a highe hydration at some point...


No, I don't have a triticale starter - I use a very small amount of my regular seed starter to create the firm levain - so I guess there's a tiny amount of wheat flour in the thing, but not much (maybe .15 oz).  I have been playing around with rye pre ferments seeded with my normal white flour starter and they behave remarkably well.


I know that Mr. Hamelman feels that a rye starter will perform better in a rye preferment, but when I use my seed in a 130% hydration rye pre ferment - the thing handily doubles in 8-10 hours and has enough ooomph to raise a wheat loaf on its own (I've been messing around with different pre ferments in wheat bread, too) so I don't feel like I can complain.


A 60% hydration triticale pre ferment is like a piece of modeling clay - whatever shape you make in the dough - that's how it stays.  It will puff and become lighter, but if you made little dents in the top - after 10-12 hours there will still be little dents on the top.  This is why I keep thinking I should push up the hydration a bit.


I tired keeping a rye starter, but because of my intense travel schedule had to let it go...


Thanks for you suggestions - I was kind of trending that way, but I don't do a lot of rye baking...

proth5's picture
proth5

for the great reference.  Reading this, I found follow on information that included some lab/baking results with pure white triticale flour.


Seem that at hydrations below 68% the stuff acts like rye.  At 68% and above it acts more like wheat - but cannot be mixed too long.  Intriguing. 


So I've ordered up a bunch of what should be winter triticale and will try at a higher hydration to see what kind of mess I have on my hands...


Those lab results are sooooo key to understanding a grain - wish they had gotten alveograph readings.