The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

New baker here :-)

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MJM's picture
MJM

New baker here :-)

Just wanted to say hello and introduce myself. I'm Meg, originally from California but married to a German. I had no idea how much I loved baking bread until I found this website, about a month ago! :-D 

Also wanted to say that the level of civility and helpfulness on this website is spectacular, especially for a beginner like myself... it goes without saying that the information is also superb! Thank you all for that, I hope I can contribute something positive as well (once I figure out these German flours... ;-)

See you 'round!

rolls's picture
rolls

lol, im sure you'll be sharing your baked creations with us on this lovely forum! i love german breads also, and those tall gughelhoph type sweet breads, and the streasel topped.....mmmmm welcome and happy baking :)


 


 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

stuff, or just generally, I like to use Ecosia.org and this popped up with a search for German flour (among other hits)  Check them out!


http://www.practicallyedible.com/edible.nsf/pages/germanflours


This next site looks also interesting:  note: there is a English translation choice.


http://www.hefe-und-mehr.de/2009/09/vollkorn-kartoffelbrot/   


Welcome  :)

MJM's picture
MJM

yum, streusel! thanks for the welcome, rolls! I haven't heard of gugelhoph before, maybe its a regional cake (I'm in North Germany) but sweet bread always sounds delicious, will check it out!


and thank you Mini Oven, for the search engine and the other link, it has some great recipes and it's perfect for practicing German. I like the idea behind Ecosia too! are you German, or have you lived in Germany?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Living in Linz (most of the time) with lots of roots in the North America's midwest.  My roots are German.  My Great, Great Grandfather built the first two story log cabin in Wisconsin, not far from the first capital of Wisconsin.  I'm the first to "return to the old world."  Lol!  You too?  


 


 

MJM's picture
MJM

Haha, back in the Old World! Marriage also brought me here, but I guess I'm coming back in a way, too - most of my great-great grandparents on my mother's side were German. But I think I heard that when they came to America they were bootleggers in Canada for a generation or two! 


I think I'd rather have your log cabin story ;-) Is it still around? Maybe a museum? And how do you like life in Linz? I hear there are even different varieties of flour in Austria... or is it similar to here?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

after a brick house was built.  The house is still standing.


Cough syrup!  Bet they had their share of fresh game in trade!  Don't be too hard on them, not too far from "fermenting" is a loaf of fresh bread!  The mash would have made some great loaves.  


Varieties of flour?  How do you mean?  I guess so.  I can go to a Reformhaus and have grain ground into flour.  They also sell mills but I'm not planning on grinding my own.  ...yet.  They never run out of rye here on supermarket shelves.  We also have spelt in as many varieties as regular wheat.  Flakes or rolled oats, barley, rye, spelt, etc. Corn comes as polenta or cornstarch flour.  Haven't seen any colored corn kernels or flour or chips.  Popcorn comes in whole plain or microwave.  Nothing of the variety to be seen.  I grew my own red popcorn last year (needed a quick hedge.)  Now that is wild stuff when it grows!  I should go try to pop some.  


We have fine and coarse (griffig) flours here for standard baking.  No "cake" flour.  If you exchange 1/3 of the flour in your basic State side cake recipes for corn starch, you gan get your recipes to work.  

MJM's picture
MJM

Ha, that's a good point about the yummy bread that could come out of the moonshine business! Now I have a new appreciation for that ;-)


Here we've got about 8-10 varieties of flour that are standard in the chain stores: Wheat - 405, 550, sometimes 812, 1050, Vollkorn, and Grieß which is apparently semolina... Rye (Roggenmehl, probably the same there) with a few choices, Spelt (I think it's Dinkel) with a few varieties.


It's really really nice... I'm in a situation where I tragically have to limit my baking but once it's resolved I am gonna go crazy with trying all the different grains. Are the numbers/names the same in Austria? I haven't seen the term "griffig" yet but I'll take a look around, maybe it's regional.


In Reformhaus like you said, they have even more types, although I didn't know that they can grind grains for you. That is pretty awesome! Grain machines are quite expensive, and are yet another thing to take up counterspace (which I'm sure is just as limited in Austria as here!)


Yeah I haven't seen whole corn kernels for popping here yet either. Growing your own sounds like fun though! Hopefully your red corn will pop, too. Cakes are not really my thing but if I start baking them more I'll remember your cornstarch tip, although apparently 405 is equivalent to American cake flour.