The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

How to adjust recipe from 1.5-pound loaf to 1-pound loaf?

mw's picture
mw

How to adjust recipe from 1.5-pound loaf to 1-pound loaf?

I'm new to this forum, and relatively new to bread making in general. I've made several boules, but have never used a loaf pan before. My husband got me two 1-pound loaf pans for Christmas, accidentally, instead of getting the 1.5-pound pans I wanted. Because all of the recipes I had planned called for 1.5-pound pans, I haven't made a single loaf yet. I'm tired of waiting!


Would anyone here be able to tell me how I can make the conversion from a 1.5-pound recipe to a 1-pound recipe? I understand from reading other threads here that my dough should weigh 1 pound 2 ounces before I put it into the 1-pound pan, and that is fine. I'm even okay with making the larger amount of dough, and then removing the excess so that I only have 1 pound 2 ounces left. I'm a beginner, and that seems like the easiest thing to do. Mainly the hold-up is the baking time. How would I adjust that to be correct?


I don't know how to add a link to the recipe here, it seems to be getting caught in the spam filter. If you google "cheddar sriracha swirl bread" you will find the recipe I am planning to use as the first result. Is there anything I can do to make this in a 1 pound pan? Is there some sort of standard time conversion that can be done? And help would really be appreciated!


 


UPDATE:


Recipe Link: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Cheddar-Sriracha-Swirl-Bread-364269


If anyone would like to make a spicy bread, this recipe is pretty good.

Ford's picture
Ford

Multiply amount of each ingredient by 2 and divide by 3.  Oven temperatures andtime should not change much --- change time not temperature, if at all.  Check internal temperature of the loaf to test for doneness, about 195°F.


Ford

BeekeeperJ's picture
BeekeeperJ

Just Make 2 batches and split it up into 3 evenly weighed portions, bake two and hold the other in the fridge or freeze for a bit then bake the 3rd.

yy's picture
yy

to convert your recipe, divide the desired weight by the standard weight. This will give you a factor by which you can multiply every ingredient weight. This will work regardless of whether you're scaling up or down. 


Example:


you want a 1 lb loaf (desired weight)


your recipe is for a 1.5 lb loaf (standard weight)


divide desired by standard weight: 1/1.5 = 2/3, or 0.666666


multiply every single ingredient weight by (2/3) or 0.666666, for instance, if you have 6 grams of salt in the standard recipe, your new amount will be 4 grams of salt. (6 x 2/3 = 4).


this will be much easier if you have a scale that measures in grams. If your recipe is in ounces, use the conversion factor of 1 oz = 28.35 grams. 


 


as for baking time, if you're going to convert the recipe to smaller sized portions (i.e. baking dinner rolls instead of a loaf), then it helps to increase the oven temperature by 25-50 degrees F so that browning occurs in a timely manner to accomodate faster cooking times. Conversely, if you're scaling up from a smaller to a larger loaf, you might want to decrease the temperature so that the outside doesn't get burnt before the inside is done. The difference between a 1.5 lb loaf to a 1 lb loaf is not that great, so I don't think you'd have to fiddle with the temperature, just the time. The most reliable way is to use a probe thermometer to test interior temperature. 

mw's picture
mw

Thanks so much for the math lesson here. I used your guidelines to increase my recipe to 2 1-lb. loaves, and it went perfectly. I gave a loaf to a friend and just cracked into the loaf I kept. The measurements appear to have been correct, and I feel confident about trying new recipes in my loaf pans now.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

First posts by new members containing offsite links tend to set off the spam filter because... well, because the vast majority of them are made by spammers.  


I just marked you trusted, so you shouldn't have to deal with the spam filtering any more.


Welcome to the site!

mw's picture
mw

Thanks to all of you for your great help. I really appreciate it! I'm going to make the bread tomorrow, and we'll see how it turns out. Hopefully my first attempt at loaves works well enough to be edible.


One last question: If I am using a thermometer to check the internal temp for doneness, could I do this with a basic meat thermometer? Also, should I leave it in the loaf the whole time, or should I open the oven when it appears done and stick the thermometer in then?

yy's picture
yy

A meat thermometer should work. I wouldn't leave it in the loaf the whole time, as doing so tends to give you a falsely high reading. Just test it when you think it's done. 

MickiColl's picture
MickiColl

our great great grandmothers didn't have instant thermometers (likely no thermometers at all) but they did bake bread. lots of it. one way to see if your bread is done is to use the "spit test". wet your finger .. either touch it to your tongue or dunk it in water and quickly touch the body of your bread pan. if it sizzles .. your bread is done. it works on both metal and glass pans. only method my Mother and Grandmother ever used. (and even tho I have an instant read thermometer, I still do, most times) how does this method work ? I have no clue. but I do know that it does.

mw's picture
mw

I've already got my dough rising, so I'll get to test this out soon enough. I am going to use the meat thermometer as well as your "spit test" and see how it goes. Thanks for the suggestion, I'll definitely be trying it out.

MickiColl's picture
MickiColl

good luck with the meat thermometer. I have tried using them for just about everything I have baked .. including meats. so far I haven't found one that is reliable. I'd be interested to know if it works for you. for thermometers, the little instant read ones are far better when it comes to accuracy. they're just as cheap, and they don't leave a huge gaping hole in anything


Micki

mw's picture
mw

The "spit test" didn't actually apply for this recipe, as the instructions were to bake inthe loaf pans for 25 minutes then to remove from the pans and bake for another 15. I did, however, use the meat thermometer to test the temperature when I took them out of the loaf pans, and the loaves were at 170F. After another 15 minutes of baking they were at 190F, just as the recipe suggested. The meat thermometer didn't leave too gaping of a hole, and I'd definitely recommend it to someone that has no other option.

mw's picture
mw

Thanks again. I can see this forum will be an invaluable resource for me in my future bread baking endeavors.

Ford's picture
Ford

Yes, a meat thermometer should work, BUT the ones I have seen have a much bigger diameter probe than the "instant reading " thermometers on the market.  Unless you don't mind the big hole left by the meat thermometer, invest in a thermometer with a small diameter probe and do not leave it in the whole time.


Ford

mw's picture
mw

I will look into getting myself one of those. Thanks for the suggestion!

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

you'll want to learn "baker's math" so that you can scale any recipe up or down with ease.  It sounds complicated, but if this math dweeb (me) could learn it, anybody can.


Of course, you will also need a scale with a tare function--new toys are always fun.  That's a good thing to have, since many of the really good bread formulas on this site are given in weight, not volume measurements. 

mw's picture
mw

I do have a good scale. 2 of them, one for small weights like grams and tenths of grams, and one for ounces and pounds. I got them both specifically for baking!


You're absolutely right, I do need to learn baker's math. I'm very intimidated by math, though, that's something I will need to overcome.


What I was most wondering about here is a way to tell how to adjust times. I'm still a bit confused on that. I haven't baked enough bread to just guess, but I think that's what I'm going to have to do. Hopefully I'll guess right, and if not I'll at least learn something in the process!

gingersnapped's picture
gingersnapped

Hi there -- I'm interested to know how your loaf turned out?  I tried this recipe last night and it was a bit of a nightmare -- I needed to add nearly an extra half cup of flour to the dough to get it even close to passable after the autolyse.  It was too sticky to work with!  3-5 minutes of hand kneading vastly underestimated what it needed.  The actual flavor of the bread was rich and delicious though.

Just wondering if you had the same issues, or would love to see pictures.

mw's picture
mw

It turned out really well, actually. I wrote about it on my blog, and included a picture. http://modernwench.com/2011/03/29/cheddar-sriracha-makes-pregnant-girls-happy/

gingersnapped's picture
gingersnapped

Wow, yours really did come out beautiful!  I look forward to trying it again using your weights.  I did the spoon and swipe method filling up the cup with flour, I'm assuming I must have definitely underpacked it. 

mw's picture
mw

I hope it turns out well for you next time around! Stop back and let me know, I'd be interested to find out how it goes.