The Fresh Loaf

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Is LB Casei mesophilic or termophilic?

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nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Is LB Casei mesophilic or termophilic?

Hi,


I'm taking a  probiotic drink which is supposed to contain only one lactobacteria: L. Casei. I'd try to culture it in milk as if it were yogurt, but:


-do I have any chance to succeed? :)


-is it a mesophilic or a termophilic bacteria? It's important for setting the right temperature. I don't want to cook the little friend.


 


Thanks.

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

I've been making my own buttermilk and yogurt lately, but have just very recently begun identifying the various contributing bacteria doing the work.
http://en.citizendium.org/wiki/Lactobacillus_casei
Description and significance

Lactobacillus casei is a rod-shaped Gram-positive bacteria. It is non-sporing, non-motile, and anaerobic. Consistent with other lactic acid bacteria, this species is acid tolerant. Lactobacillus casei dwells in environments such as the intestinal tracts of animals and fermented dairy products. It can be found naturally in both the human intestine and the mouth. They have a wide temperature range as well as a wide pH range. The organism is mesophilic, which means it has an optimum temperature range around 30°C to 40°C. The optimum pH is at approximately 5.5. Scientists have found it to possess beneficial properties that support human health. It is able to improve and promote digestion. Some strains of the bacteria help control diarrhea, while other strains have an anti-inflammatory effect on the gut. Other advantageous effects include reducing lactose intolerance, alleviating constipation, and even modulation of the immune system. Numerous strains have been proven to be probiotics, that is according to the World Health Organization, are "live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host." Because it is lactic acid producer, it has several applications in biotechnology and in the food industry.

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

means room temperature from june to september... but in the meantime the yogurt-maker should do.


Thanks Mrfrost!

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Happened to be reading some yogurt labels in the store yesterday, and  L. Casei was mentioned with the cultures on several brands.


There's a great site I use that teaches all about how to make all kinds of cultured products, cheese, buttermilk, yogurt, etc.


http://biology.clc.uc.edu/fankhauser/Cheese/CHEESE.HTML

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

but I lost it. Thanks for the reminder.