The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

My first Bauernbrot German Rye - in fact, my first rye!!

michael p's picture
michael p

My first Bauernbrot German Rye - in fact, my first rye!!

This came out FANTASTIC, and interestingly, now that it's cooled (we at half right out of the oven) it smells even better!  Recipe off the Internet, just some random recipe that sounded good, after reading about German's on seriouseats.com

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

beauty !  Now show us what it looks like inside (the crumb). :)

Load up on liverwurst, pickles, Vidalia onions, Brie cheese, etc :)

anna

 

Noor13's picture
Noor13

I bet it tasted very nice-it sure looks mouthwaterin

Noor

Emelye's picture
Emelye

You tell us this beautiful loaf came out a formula you found on the internet and you didn't give us a link!

Some nice Westfälischen Schinken (ham) and a nice Gruyer with some coarse mustard will be good with bread like this as well.  Just plain with sweet butter should do too, if it's anything like the Bauernbrot I can remember getting when I visited my gandparents in Bavaria, years ago.

Tschüß!

michael p's picture
michael p

Sorry about the no-linkey, I don't post here often so I'm not sure of the protocol, plus I was in a hurry to get out of the house after this came out of the oven.

Here's the article that got me interested in the style:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/02/snapshots-from-germany-bread-bakeries-organic.html

Then I did an internets search, and the recipe I used seemed to fit the bill and fit what I had on hand (except the rye flour which I bought - just Red Mill dark rye and KA - AP flour for the rest)

It was my first rye (don't really even eat it) but as you can see the picture is so enticing.  And definitely not my last, rye is my new favorite!

Here's the recipe I used, in conjunction with mucho help from a search of TFL:

http://www.whats4eats.com/breads/bauernbrot-recipe

michael p's picture
michael p

Here it is sliced, unfortunately my GF doesn't have a bread knife so we had to use a dull butcher's knife, so it's kind of smooshed, and has crumbs on it from the cutting board overnight.  The bread was warm, silky and very moist (it was baked to an internal temp of about 198).  And Memo to self:  rustic breads taste even better after they cool and set!  This one smelled great this a.m. but I didn't get a chance at a bite.  Definitely a do-again, maybe more rye next time.

Emelye's picture
Emelye

Thanks for the link!

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

being German myself, I always get a kick out of the various German baking and cooking sites.  Much appreciated, and I will definitely give this bread a try in a traditional Römertopf.  :)

Anna

 

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

http://www.whats4eats.com/breads/bauernbrot-recipe  and it was AWSOME !  It tasted VERY German.  I had never made a starter which was perfect in 5 hours (I did a room-overnight one since it got so cold), a few kneading cycles with the remaining ingredients the next morning and a couple of stretch and folds and voila, a very very tasty bread.

Thanks for the link again !!

Anna

 

michael p's picture
michael p

A loaf so nice, I baked it twice!  This time I double the rye in the recipe and it came out fantastic, as you can see by my gf's smile.  Took longer to rise ('cause of the doubled rye?) but once I put on the dishwasher and closed the kitchen doors it popped right up.  Cooking time was closer to 35 minutes to 200 deg. internal, still silky and moist!

michael p's picture
michael p

And sliced ...

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I hate to say it, Michael, but that recipe is definitely americanized. Germans do not have a lot of sweetener in their breads, Bauernbrote are usually lean breads without any honey or sugar, and the large amount of caraway in it is typical American, too.

We do have caraway in breads, but just as a spice, together with the other bread spices anise, fennel and coriander,  in very small amounts. A bread with that much caraway in it would go by the name "Kümmelbrot" (caraway bread).

Otherwise, the bread looks very nice, and if it tastes good, who cares.

Karin

michael p's picture
michael p

Thanks, Karin.  I actually didn't use carroway (don't like the taste too much), and thanks for the other input.  I suspect the sugar/honey was more food for the yeast? 

Since my initial post, I've gotten three Reinhart books, including the "whole grain" one.  I think I'll try one of his rye's for my next bread.

FYI, here in Chicago (for those of you close by) we have a "taste and tell" meetup re: yeast breads.  Next meetup in December is "bake a bread you've never baked before" so a new rye will be perfect. 

Newbies and old-hats, anyone is welcome.  Very casual, lots of great breads to try.

http://www.meetup.com/Chicago-Amateur-Bread-Bakers/

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

with Reinhart's books. I baked nearly every recipe in "The Bread Baker's Apprentice", "Whole Grain Breads" and most of the "Artisan Bread Every Day" ones.

The only issue I and some other TFLers have is the amount of sweetener (in WGB). Peter Reinhart has (admittedly) a bit of a sweet tooth. I usually reduce the honey from 42.5 g down to 19 g, (except for the 100% whole wheat breads that need the whole amount).

Happy Thanksgiving,

Karin

Transitional Multigrain Struan (from WGB) - one of my favorites (and best sellers).