The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Light Whole Wheat Batard

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Syd's picture
Syd

Light Whole Wheat Batard

Light Whole Wheat Batard


150g starter at 100% hydration


275g water


80g whole wheat


20g rye


350g bread flour (11.4% protein)


10g salt


 


Autolyse (with starter) for 50mins.  Add salt. Knead by hand until salt is incorporated.  Bulk fement 2 and a half hours with folds at 50 and 100 mins.  Divide in two.  Preshape.  Rest 20 mins.  Shape into batards.  Allow to proof to about three quarters of final size. Retard overnight in fridge.  Remove from fridge and allow to complete final proof.  Bake at 230C with steam for 20 mins and at 200 without steam for 20. 


 


And the cross section.


 



I am becoming convinced of late that sourness has more to do with the acidity of the starter prior to mixing than it has to do with length of bulk ferment, hydration of starter or retardation of dough.  I have retarded loaves overnight that haven't had the slightest hint of sourness and I have made loaves where the entire process took no longer than eight hours that were mouth puckeringly sour.  The above batards were made with a starter that had definite acetic overtones and the tang is evident in the baked loaf.  When I opened the jar to use the starter the acetic tones were actually quite overpowering, but after I gave the starter a good stir the fruity notes took over so I would only classify this as slightly acid.  The baked bread has only a very mild tang.  But I have baked bread with starters that have very strong acetic smells and the final product is really very sour.  Invariably these breads can only handle a short bulk fermentation and final proof before gluten starts to break down. 


Syd

Comments

MichaelH's picture
MichaelH

Looks like your fermentation and shaping were just right. Well done.


Michael

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks, Michael.  We are having the perfect weather for bread making right now: temps of around 25C.  I am dreading the warmer weather, not only because of how difficult it makes bread baking, but also because it is just unbearable sometimes. 


Syd

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Very nice looking bread Syd. The crumb structure is really great.


Eric


 

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks, Eric.  :)

davidg618's picture
davidg618

I make a 40% WW 60% Bread flour, wherein I preferment 30% of the flour, all whole wheat, building the levain--usually  500g--from 20g of my refrigerated starter. If I let each build go only eight hours at room temperature--I normally use three builds, over 24 hours-- a very mild or no acid "tang" results. If I let each build go twelve hour I get a very distinctive sourness in the loaves.


The down-side using twelve hours between builds: Each build's volume peaks at 7 or 8 hours, subsequently collapsing. Coupled with the WW bran shortened gluten, I don't get oven spring equivalent to the parent formula (45%AP, 45% Bread, 10% Whole Rye). Furthermore, the increased acid also seems to make the 70% hydrated dough weaker, or more extensible. I have difficulty shaping a taut gluten sheath.  This too effects the oven spring--it goes more sideways than up, and retarded bulk fermentation makes it even worse. Nonetheless, the sour and wheaty flavor profile is wonderful.


I recently made two 750g loaves using a hybrid levain build--8 hours, 8 hours, 12 hours--and only 3.5 hours bulk fermentation at 76°F. The oven spring was excellent. I have neither tasted nor seen the crumb on these loaves yet. I can't predict the flavor, but, from feel, I'm expecting a reasonably open crumb. I'm hoping letting the third build, when all the 30% planned flour was prefermenting, go twelve hour is enough to produce the sourness I want.


David G

Syd's picture
Syd


The down-side using twelve hours between builds: Each build's volume peaks at 7 or 8 hours, subsequently collapsing. Coupled with the WW bran shortened gluten, I don't get oven spring equivalent to the parent formula (45%AP, 45% Bread, 10% Whole Rye).



This, unfortunately, seems to be the trade off.



Furthermore, the increased acid also seems to make the 70% hydrated dough weaker, or more extensible. I have difficulty shaping a taut gluten sheath.  This too effects the oven spring--it goes more sideways than up, and retarded bulk fermentation makes it even worse.



Exactly what I find, but I am willing to sacrifice some volume and appearance for that tang.  It makes sourdough for me.  I just love that mild sourness mingling with lightly melted butter and cheese on a slice of toast!



I recently made two 750g loaves using a hybrid levain build--8 hours, 8 hours, 12 hours--and only 3.5 hours bulk fermentation at 76°F. The oven spring was excellent. I have neither tasted nor seen the crumb on these loaves yet. I can't predict the flavor, but, from feel, I'm expecting a reasonably open crumb. I'm hoping letting the third build, when all the 30% planned flour was prefermenting, go twelve hour is enough to produce the sourness I want.



Now that is an interesting experiment.  I would love to hear the results.  My fearless forecast is that you probably will get some of that sourness.  Please post the details.  Thanks for your detailed response.


Syd


 

davidg618's picture
davidg618

Syd,


I cut into one of the two loaves yesterday. Subjectively, this bread has even more sourness than that made with a twelve-hour prefermented all-whole-wheat levain. Not surprising since 1/9th of the levain's flour fermented for 28 hours, 1/3rd for 20 hours, and all of it for 12 hours. I'm quite satisfied with the crumb, and crust, and especially the flavor.



David G

Syd's picture
Syd

Well, if the flavour is right, then I always feel as if I am three quarters of the way there.  But I do like an aesthetically pleasing loaf, too and when both come together I get a real sense of achievement.  And you have more than satisfied all criteria there, David.  That's a real beauty!  The crumb is lovely and open and the crust is the perfect thickness and colour.  What percentage of whole wheat did you use?


regards,


Syd 

davidg618's picture
davidg618

and I feed the levain builds entirely with Whole Wheat flour (30% of final dough).


David G.

varda's picture
varda

This looks fantastic.   Think I'll try it.   And I love your succinct instructions.  -Varda

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks, Varda.  A lot of my loaves are based on this formula :1:2:3 (starter:water:flour), although in this case, you will notice, I didn't use double the water. I did this on purpose because I wanted to get a better height.  The higher the hydration, the more the dough tends to spread out.  This resulted in a dough with a 66% hydration.  I almost always use an amount of 500g (or multiples of) flour as the resulting quantity of dough is perfect for my bannetons/loaf pans, etc.  It is also is an easy amount to do the math on.  :)


regards,


Syd

varda's picture
varda

I put this on my ever growing list of breads to try and finally got to it:




I followed along your instructions fairly carefully but made a couple changes.   I wanted to use my regular 62% starter, so I adjusted the water accordingly.   Then I refrigerated right after shaping since I think I understand the timing better that way.   Then I scaled up so each loaf is around 545g.   I don't know if any of that should have much impact.   Your crumb was nicer I think.  I just tasted and it's really flavorful - and as per your remarks, as my starter isn't sour neither is this.   Thanks for sharing.   -Varda

Syd's picture
Syd

Beautiful, Varda!  Lovely scoring.  The main reason I three quarter prove then refrigerate is because it means I can have fresh bread soon after I get up the next morning.  Often times the final proof will take only as long as it does for the oven to pre-heat.  Also, I am confident that my fridge is cold enough to stop the rising in its tracks and I know it won't over prove.  Thanks for posting.


Syd

LeeYong's picture
LeeYong

I certainly must try this recipe out! They look wonderful!


Happy baking!


LeeYong

Syd's picture
Syd

Thank you, LeeYong.  :)


Syd


 

breadsong's picture
breadsong

 Hello Syd, I admire this batard of yours very much.



Allow to proof to about three quarters of final size. Retard overnight in fridge.



I'll try this with my next bake. I usually shape and then put the loaves straight into the fridge. I'd like to try your proofing method - I sure am impressed with how it's working for you!
Thanks from breadsong


 

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks, Breadsong.  Coming from a master scorer such as yourself, that is a real compliment. 


Yes, doing most of the proofing before the retarding means less time is needed to complete the final proof the following morning and you can have the loaf in the oven in as little as an hour's time.  Sometimes I even proof it further the night before and bake straight out of the fridge the next morning.  There is a caveat, though:  if your fridge is not cold enough, it could overprove during the retard.  My fridge is cold enough (4C, I think) to arrest its development almost instantly.  After 12 hours in the fridge there is hardly any noticeable difference in the volume of the dough.  I would never do that with a yeasted dough, however.  A yeasted dough would be sure to overprove.


regards,


Syd


 

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Syd,
Thanks so much for your kind words, and additional tips on proofing.
I'm going to check the temperature in my fridge for reference.
Thanks! from breadsong


 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Beautiful Wholewheat Syd! Grigne, Crust and Crumb are of Professional Grade..!


Well done

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks, Khalid!  I still have to use a straight blade held at about 30 degrees to get that grigne.  Haven't been able to learn how to use a curved lame, yet.  Somehow it always snags on the dough. 


Best,


Syd

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Beautiful loaves, Syd. Nice crust and crumbs. I love the little specks of sunflower seeds (?, I'm not sure if they're sunflower seeds) on the crust as well. They're virtually appealing and appetizing. Great job!


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks, Sue. :)



I love the little specks of sunflower seeds (?, I'm not sure if they're sunflower seeds) on the crust as well. They're virtually appealing and appetizing.



They are wheat berries.  It was a bit of an afterthought, to be honest.  Tossed some into the cloth lined bannetons and they stuck.


Just had a look through your blogspot.  Your macarons look gorgeous as does your cranberry and walnut sourdough.


Best,


Syd

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

That is one amazingly beautiful batard!


 


I am very tempted to try it in my small oven, and see what happens.   I might make it on Sunday.


 


strangely enough, I am having a horrible time finding rye flour in Los Angeles!  Tried five different grocery stores, including a Whole Foods, and NO LUCK!


 


 

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks, Sally.  :)   Difficult to find rye in Los Angeles?  Now I don't feel so bad about having a hard time finding it in Taiwan.  I am sure it would be fine without the rye, though.  It isn't a large amount.


Best,


Syd

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

I am quite puzzled by this, actually.  In Oklahoma I can find different kinds of rye flour (dark, light) right in the less well stocked grocery store in town.


 


Here they have things like soy flour, peanut flour, rice flour, almond flour, pastry flour, but... NO RYE!    I love its flavor in bread, though -  hate to leave it out

Zeb's picture
Zeb

That's a beauty Syd! 


Very interested to read your thoughts on the acids and timing, I'm thinking the same sort of thoughts, but not as coherently...


Thank you!

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks, Zeb.  Yes, in my experience, the sourness of the starter before mixing impacts more on the final acidity of the loaf than any other factor.


Best,


Syd