The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Wolf Double Ovens?

  • Pin It
smasty's picture
smasty

Wolf Double Ovens?

I should have asked this before I ordered them.  Getting ready for a kitchen remodel and decided on Wolf double ovens.  Convection on top, non-convection on the bottom.  Anyone else have these?  Like 'em?  (I hope!)


Sue

kneading's picture
kneading

I had mine installed yesterday. Wish I could comment on how it works but it sure looks awesome. I plan  to check it out this weekend. 

smasty's picture
smasty

I can't wait to hear what you think!

breadbythecreek's picture
breadbythecreek

I've had mine for six years. Never a problem. I used to bake all sorts of pastry, cakes, cookies twice a week for my artist friends - everything turned out spectacular.  Now making bread - so much fun.  I love opening the doors and seeing all that blue!

smasty's picture
smasty

That blue interior is striking! I'm so glad you have liked them!

kneading's picture
kneading

For breakfast I used the griddle on my stove which was fantastic. Then I made our family's favorite banana bread which turned out great. My kids are requesting my go to dinner rolls but I'm going to try the cafeteria rolls instead. I also like the blue interior and that the  racks don't fall out ( down)  when you pull them forward. I like the small oven because it's a good size for us empty nesters but when  I want to make 5 loaves of bread there will be plenty of room in the large oven.. However, I still will continue to look out my backyard and  lust over my neighbors wood burning stove ( which they don't use!! ) 

breadbythecreek's picture
breadbythecreek

Sounds like you got a good thing going.  IMHO With all baking, it's all about precise measurements and having the right tools for the job.


I also like that the bottom rack slides right onto the door and the door is strong enough to hold it. Gotta hand it to whoever engineered this one.  I wish the baking stone was bigger. I just shelled out $$ for a fibrament stone and boy is it nice to have all of that real estate to work with. 


BTW- a warning. Don't be foolish like I was and line the bottom of the oven with foil for "easy cleaning". It'll fuse to the porcelain and wreck the finish. It won't harm the function of the oven, but won't be perfect anymore. Sob.  Just like the first scratch on a new car.


Check out today's baguettes on my website: artbythecreek.com


Cheers.

kneading's picture
kneading

My installer warned me about the foil. There was a label on the front door which is not to be taken off except by the home owner concerning the aluminum foil. My installer took it off, handed it to me and said read this. After I read the warning he told me   what can happen if I put foil there. I have had a very large stone for 20- 25 years. I have no idea where I got it from but  it almost fits one of the large oven racks. Wish I had another one.

breadbythecreek's picture
breadbythecreek

Good installer.  Pretty sure that warning wasn't that prominent six years ago when we got ours.  Or maybe it was and I wasn't paying enough attention.  Still, it didn't hurt the actual oven, just the finish in one smallish spot.  Live and learn and learn some more.  

smasty's picture
smasty

Thanks everyone for sharing experiences and warnings!  I assume temps are accurate for everyone?

breadbythecreek's picture
breadbythecreek

They've always been spot on for me.  Only issues have been user errors, like baking frozen cherries in cakes and expecting them to bake the same.  Great purchase and would do it again if I ever get the chance.  Maybe in my next life a great big full size range?  I could bake for the whole neigborhood.

smasty's picture
smasty

I don't think I've ever cooked w/ convection heat...how has that affected your baking?  How about the proof setting...do y'all use that? 

breadbythecreek's picture
breadbythecreek

I'll jump in.   For cakes and pastry, I always used convection as I believe it helps with even baking.  I may have decreased the baking time/temperature a little bit, but not much (5 degrees/5 minutes).  For bread, I'll turn on the convection only after the steam cycle. With a full oven steam (like with the lava rocks/boiling water method) you don't want convection and you need to plug the vents to keep the steam in.  Now that I'm using the steamer/lid method, I don't worry about this anymore.


I've never used the proof setting and didn't even know it existed before I went to temper the new fibrament stone. Living in AZ, our kitchen is usually plenty warm to proof dough by itself.


Anybody else?