The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Yogurt Bread - Part One and Deux

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Yogurt Bread - Part One and Deux

I'm finally able to drag myself to my computer to edit photos and do a fancy write-up of my latest bakes…  I've been spending too much time at work lately, and have not had time to write about baking, which seems to take more time and effort than just baking alone…  

Anyways, I had some yogurt that had been sitting around, and I've been too lazy to eat it for some reason.  I remember seeing a recipe on Zorra's blog for a Yoghurt loaf: http://kochtopf.twoday.net/stories/joghurtbrot-yoghurt-loaf/.  

These are my versions.  Version 1 is direct proofing, using more yeast, and making the bread in a few hours with direct proofing.  Version 2 uses less yeast, some honey, and refrigerated proofing.  I think version 2 is much better in all aspects, especially crumb and flavor…  Enjoy.

Tim


1/18/11 - Yogurt Bread - Part One - Direct proofing


Recipe
900g AP
100g WW
620g Water
22g Kosher Salt
200g Yogurt (Stonyfield Organic Cream Top)
176g Sourdough Starter (Storage starter at approx 68% hydration)
10g Instant Yeast
2028g Total Dough Yield

Method
8:05pm - In a large mixing bowl, add wet ingredients, and then all dry ingredients on top.  Mix with rubber spatula for approx 3 minutes, or until dough forms shaggy dough.  Cover with plastic bag and let rest.

8:30pm - Squish dough with wet hands to make sure all the lumps are gone.  Turn dough in bowl using wet hands and plastic scraper 3 times using letter fold method.  cover and let rest.

9:00pm - Turn dough, cover and let rest.

9:30pm - Turn dough, cover and let rest.

10:20pm - Divide dough into 2 equal pieces, shape into boules, place seam side up in well floured, linen lined bannetons.  Place bannetons in plastic bag.  Let proof for approx 1 hr.

10:30pm - Arrange baking stone (14" x 16"), and loaf pan with lava rocks and water filled about 3/4 way.  Preheat oven with convection to 500F for 1 hr.

11:30pm - Turn boules out onto floured peel, slash as desired, place into oven directly on to stone.  Bake for 10 mins at 500F with steam, no convection, then turn down to 450F, remove steam pan, rotate loaves, bake for another 30-35 minutes, or until internal temp reaches 210F and loaves weight 15% less than pre bake weight.  Cool overnight on wire rack before cutting and eating…







1/22/11 - Yogurt Bread - Part Deux - Retarded Proofing



Recipe
900g AP
100g WW
600g Water
20g Kosher Salt
30g Honey
200g Yogurt (Stonyfield Organic Cream Top)
190g Sourdough Starter (Storage starter at approx 68% hydration)
4g Instant Yeast (1 tsp)
2044g Total Dough Yield

Method
1/22/11 - Evening
10:26pm - In a large mixing bowl, add wet ingredients, and then all dry ingredients on top.  Mix with rubber spatula for approx 3 minutes, or until dough forms shaggy dough.  Cover with plastic bag and let rest.

10:32pm - Squish dough with wet hands to make sure all the lumps are gone.  Turn dough in bowl using wet hands and plastic scraper 3 times using letter fold method.  cover and let rest.

10:45pm - Turn dough, cover and let rest.

11:30pm - Divide dough into 2 equal pieces, shape into boules, place seam side down in well floured, linen lined bannetons.  Place bannetons in plastic bag, place in refrigerator overnight.  Go to bed.

1/23/11 - Next Morning
9:10am - Take bannetons out of fridge, place on counter.  Arrange baking stone (14" x 16"), and loaf pan with lava rocks and water filled about 3/4 way.  Preheat oven with convection to 500F for at least 1/2 hr.

9:45am - Turn boules out onto floured peel, place into oven directly on to stone.  Bake for 10 mins at 500F with steam, no convection, then turn down to 450F, remove steam pan, rotate loaves, bake for another 30-35 minutes, or until internal temp reaches 210F and loaves weight 15% less than pre bake weight.  Cool completely on wire rack before cutting and eating…









Sent to Susan at Yeastspotting on 1/26/2011

Comments

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Way to Go, Tim! Lovely Boules!!you should consider rearranging your stones, i can see the effects of uneven heat, especially with the burst boule on the top. You may want to check Sylvia's New staaming method (wet towels in a pan), give it a shot! 


Bold Bake!

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Thanks...  On the first attempt, I placed the boules to close together, which is why there was the odd blow out on the bottom left hand corner loaf...   I may have also may have shaped one of them tighter than the other, so it may not have been fully proofed before dumping them into the oven...  I am happy for the most part with my lava rocks in a loaf pan for now...

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello breadbakingbassplayer,
It's great to see another post of yours and see the great results you got with your yogurt bread.
I love the crust and crackles on the second loaf!

I've admired your loaves very much and saved as a favorite your Cranberry Apple Cider Bread with Walnuts.
Larry just posted about his Apple-Walnut bread & then I remembered your Cider Bread, so I decided to try making some apple bread.
I used sour cream, applesauce and sparkling apple juice for hydration. (I would have used hard cider as you did, but I wasn't crazy about the flavor of the hard cider I'd purchased so went with the juice).

With sour cream as as one of the ingredients I found the crumb to be tender and soft, and was wondering if you experienced a similar effect from using yogurt?

Thanks so much for another interesting and inspiring post,
from breadsong

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Great looking boules, Tim.


I second your thoughts that the Part Deux's could be underproof.


I usually retarded my shaped loaves overnight. When I took the shaped loaves out next day, I normally have to wait for at least an hour (or longer most of the times, depending on the room temperature) for the doughs to be ready. 40 mins seems like too short a waiting time to take the chill out of the dough (andI guess  it must be very cold in US as well).


They're fabulous bake nonetheless.


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/

wally's picture
wally

I think they've both got a great looking crumb.  I imagine the one retarded would have more flavor (and I note the greater amount of starter you used in number 2).


So, how would you describe the flavor contribution of the yogurt?  Is there a more pronounced sourness, or, does the honey offset that?  I'd also be curious if the keeping quality is extended.


Nice bake,


Larry