The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hamelman's Five-Grain Sourdough with Rye Sourdough

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varda's picture
varda

Hamelman's Five-Grain Sourdough with Rye Sourdough

Today was another snowday, so I again canceled a variety of plans to stay home with my son.   Amazing how nicely baking bread fits into that routine.   I had already planned to bake, but had no idea how I was going to fit it in, since I always manage to be out of the house at the exact moment that some essential step has to happen.   No such worries today.   I made Hamelman's 5 grain sourdough for the first time, as well as yet another iteration on my own elusive sourdough.  Actually I made Hamelman's 5 minus 1 plus replacements sourdough.  Since I don't like sunflower seeds, I upped the flax seeds and oats.  I don't have cracked rye (or know what it is) and had just bought a tiny bag of wheat berries, having no idea what to do with them, so I threw them into a coffee grinder and gave them a whirl, and voila - cracked something.   The resulting bread is just awesomely tasty.   Only after I tasted it did I run to this site and search, and see how them as come before me have raved about it.   Absolutely delicious, and compared to what I've been trying to make lately, like a walk in the park.   What other jewels is Hamelman hiding up his sleeve?   Not that he has any duds as far as I can tell.  But some are better than others, and this is just amazing.  




and rye and white sourdoughs side by side:


Comments

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

 



What other jewels is Hamelman hiding up his sleeve?   Not that he has any duds as far as I can tell. 



So Mr. Hamelman is a nudist?  I had no idea.


Lovely loaves, Varda.  I plan to try that formula (with sunflower seeds...my favorite).  Thanks.


Glenn  

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

That nudists in Vermont wear sleeves, especially in January.


David

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

varda's picture
varda

What kind of tricks is Hamelman going to turn, no, that's not it.   I guess I have to take a bit of time to get my metaphors sorted out.  

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Turning tricks?  LOL.  I had a flashback to Goldie Hawn and "Laugh-In."   :-)


Anyway, nice job on the rye.


Do you have a burr coffee grinder?  I think the ability to control the grind would work pretty well with rye berries.  Hmm.  I might have to experiment with that.  

varda's picture
varda

Hey, I'm just trying to keep up with the Snyder brothers, which isn't easy.   Anyhow, I used a simple one-speed Krups coffee grinder to "crack" the wheat berries for the soaker.   Since I was making one big loaf, I only needed a couple of ounces, and I figured if I'd put the berries in a food processor, they would just lie below the blade.   It didn't do a great job.   I just ran them through for a few seconds, because I didn't want to get flour, so some of them weren't even touched.   But they soak for around 16 hours so I figured the ones that didn't get cracked would soften up anyhow, and it seems to have worked ok. 

sphealey's picture
sphealey

=== Anyhow, I used a simple one-speed Krups coffee grinder to "crack" the wheat berries for the soaker.   Since I was making one big loaf, I only needed a couple of ounces, and I figured if I'd put the berries in a food processor, they would just lie below the blade.  ===


The trick here is to fill the lid, not the body of the grinder, then carefully put the grinder on the lid (rather than the lid on the grinder).  Keeping a firm grip on the lid, start with the grinder upside-down, press the switch, and gently turn turn it over.  The kernels will fall through the blade and most will get chopped.  Turn it over a few times if necessary (but don't drop it!).  This works well for coffee too, esp when you are mixing pre-ground and whole-bean coffees.


sPh

varda's picture
varda

That makes a lot of sense.   Thanks for the tip.   -Varda

rayel's picture
rayel

Beautiful bread Varda. Hard to choose, I think I'd like them both.


Ray

varda's picture
varda

Thanks Ray.   I was just going through my old blog posts (and accidentally reposted this trying to fix a picture) and thinking I should make this again some time soon.   It was really delicious.  I mean the Hamelman - the white is my own personal sourdough baker tinkerer project.   -Varda

hanseata's picture
hanseata

was my First Loaf of the Year, and I thought it was absolutely delicious!


I like sunflower seeds, but I'm sure you could use nuts or pumpkin seeds as well. I made a 3-step starter, because it tastes and performs better, otherwise followed the recipe.


Sphealy's trick with the coffee grinder is very helpful, I'm always annoyed because my Cuisinart grinds the beans so unevenly. Cracked rye I get in bulk for my like bakery, and I have a hand cranking mill for other coarse grinds.


Karin


 

varda's picture
varda

I made this without sunflower seeds and just upped the flax and oats and it had a ton of flavor but sure - you could replace them instead.   I am curious about what you said "cracked rye I get in bulk for my like bakery."   Do you mean you have a bakery that supplies you with bulk quantities?   That's terrific.   I know others do but I've been too shy to approach anyone about it.   Meanwhile I have a closet full of different flours, seeds and grains in little bags.   I guess that's better than big bags.   -Varda

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Varda, I misspelt it, I meant "little bakery" - I sell my European breads to a local natural food store. I buy most of my supplies from a whole grocer that has a selection of organic goods. But some things, like whole spelt berries, A & B Naturals orders for me from one of their suppliers (they don't sell them in the store).


Rye is very hard to crack - I tried it with a food processor, and got just a little dust off it. I don't know whether the coffee mill trick works for rye, too.


If you are a frequent customer in a store, they are usually willing to sell you some of their bulk stuff. I asked my favorite kitchen supply store (you can always do with another gadget!) about parchment paper in sheets, and they sold me some (full sheets) they ordered for their own bakery (I cut them in halves), much cheaper than the ones you buy pre-cut from King Arthur.


Karin


 

varda's picture
varda

I wish someone near me were selling breads like the ones I see you posting about.    (Or maybe I don't - that might interfere with my baking habit.)   I think I need to take a ride down to Cambridge and check out the food coop - they have big bins of flour of many types, but I'm not sure what.   Most likely cracked rye as well.  -Varda