The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Curiosity about dry milk in sourdough bread???

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grimeswh's picture
grimeswh

Curiosity about dry milk in sourdough bread???

   I have a start and the recipe I'm using is one that my mother and grandmother have used for years so I've never seen a reason to change it considering it's one I like and it's easy. It only consists of baking soda, eggs, flour, starter, and sugar... Not much to it I know but it works for me.... Anyway a few weeks ago I was looking up some yeast bread recipes and I noticed a lot of them had the ingredient dry milk in them. Well I tried the recipe and now I have oodles of dry milk just sitting there and I don't know what to do with it. What exactly does dry milk do for bread? Does it make it raise better, make it softer, denser, etc? Obviously it adds some nutritional value, but does it do anything else??? Also do I need to add water or do I just add the dry milk and call it good. Anyone have any comments?

BettyR's picture
BettyR

Dry milk is easier and quicker to use than regular milk...no scalding and cooling.


It improves the texture of the bread crumb... making it softer, more cake like.


Using dry milk instead of regular milk will keep the crust from getting too soft as with regular milk.


I know this is not a concern with most people but where I live it is a 30 minute drive to the nearest grocery store. I use dry milk in all my baking to save my liquid milk for drinking. I just add the milk powder with the dry ingredients then add the same amount of tap water as the recipe calls for milk.


Dry milk will stay good on the shelf for a very long time but personally I go through quite a bit of it.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

on hand.  It just tastes so much better to me but, I know, has more fat content.

kmrice's picture
kmrice

Fresh milk, even after pasturization, has enzymes which affect bread making. Among other things, I believe they inhibit the yeast. This is why fresh milk is generally scalded before it is used in bread as scalding kills (breaks down?) the enzymes.


Milk powder has, in effect, already been scalded, which is why it works so well in bread. No enzymes.


Most milk powder is made from skim milk, but you can always add butter to the recipe to make up for the butter missing from the milk powder.


Personally, I have not noticed much difference between bread made with milk powder and bread made with scalded milk, so I generally use milk powder.


Karl

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

But common grocery store non fat dry milk has not been processed at temperatures high enough(and long enough) to deactivate (all)the enzymes. When/if it is so processed(scalded), it is usually labeled as something like "high heat dried milk", or the like. Baker's Special non fat dry milk for example.


There are several threads here discussing the matter.

BettyR's picture
BettyR

You may very well be correct but it is used for that purpose so much that I have to believe that whatever process is used to make ordinary dry milk must deactivate enough of the enzymes as to make it practical for this use.


 


I recently watched an episode of Good Eats where Alton Brown was making bread and he used ordinary non fat dried milk in his bread. He actually used more milk solids than was recommended for making milk with. He said what the benefits were but I'm afraid I can't remember. Sadly my memory isn't what it used to be.

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Someone hinted to me that being caseine an emulsifier it has some positive effect on the dough, mostly the capacity to protect starch granules from staling for a longer time. Since milk powder has roughly 35% of proteins (most of which caseine) you can decide how much caseine you want in your dough without adding an amount of liquids that the flour couldn't hold.


Moreover, milk powder dissolved in water is much more convenient than plain milk for bakers because it takes much less space and doesn't expire. Same argument for pasteurized yolks instead of plain eggs.


All of this is hearsay, don't consider me responsible if this information is wrong :-)


 

grimeswh's picture
grimeswh

Well, just after I made this post I decided to mix down my start so I could make bread tonight. I figured I might as well do 2 loaves one with non-fat dry milk and one without just to see if there was a difference. I was amazed. The crust is softer and the inner "white" part was much more "fluffy" and soft. Exactly what I was hoping for thank you so much for the comments everyone. I was very pleased with the bread made tonight =D.

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Please grimeswh, can you specify the doses of all ingredients? Did you dissolve dry milk in water or did you add it to the flour?

kmrice's picture
kmrice

Great! Glad you accomplished what you wanted.


Nicodvb - I just add the milk powder to the flour. No need to dissolve it.


Karl

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

ok, but how much powder in how much flour?

BettyR's picture
BettyR

All the dried milk that I have used avarages around 1/3 cup of dried milk to 1 cup of water to make 1 cup of milk. So if your recipe calls for 2 cups of milk or water you would use 2/3 cup of dried milk.


 


Now the way I do it is I add my water, salt, sugar, melted butter, beaten egg and dried milk to my mixer bowl or bread machine pan and mix this all together. Then add the flour and the yeast, mix well and leave it to sit and bloom for 1 hour.


 


Then I knead my dough, cover it and let it sit for 1 more hour.


Then I shape it and place it in the pan. Let it rise to double and bake.


 


Hope this helps...

grimeswh's picture
grimeswh

I wasn't sure weather or not to dissolve it so I just went ahead and dissolved it. Next time I'm going to just add the powder to the flour though because I don't think it's going to make that much of a difference. I measured 1/4 cup of dissolved milk for one loaf. I'm not sure how much dry milk that would be without the added water. I'm guessing about 1-2 tablespoons of dry milk.

BettyR's picture
BettyR

It really doesn't make any difference when you add the dried milk but we all have our comfortable habits and mine is adding my dried milk to my wet ingredients. It would make no difference if I added to the flour...it's just the way I like to do it.

breadnovice's picture
breadnovice


I’m just starting to get into bread making but I have been making sourdough waffles and pancakes for decades. Non-fat dry milk is an important ingredient to my recipes. (Lately I’ve been using dry buttermilk with much success.) I haven’t used it in bread.  I always use it dry.  Thank you to all the posters to this thread. I’ll try dry milk in my bread.