The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

New from East Texas

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farm-girl-195's picture
farm-girl-195

New from East Texas

Hi ya'll,  Have been interested in making my own bread for some time.  Purchased "The Bread Baker's Apprentice" and am itching to get started.  Family got me a bread machine for Christmas but want to really get my hands dirty.  Just moved into an old drafty house with a fireplace as the only source of heat.  It is currently 26 degrees outside and 55-65 inside and yes wearing layers is a must!!! Central air and heat coming soon but not soon enough!  (Good Lord, what were we thinking!!!!!)


Question:  When a recipe calls for the dough to rise at room temperature, what temp would that be?  I am assuming here that "my current" room temp is closer to that of my refrigerator, so in order for me to get a good rise will have to know what is considered room temperature or use alternate method.


Have not gotten into the machine enough to feel comfortable with experimentation.  (machine is WestBend Hi-Rise Breadmaker)


Thanks for the help. 

cpanza's picture
cpanza

Farm Girl,


Check out our BBA Challenge 2011 (which uses that book), which just started. Go here to check out what we're up to. We'd love to have you along!


Chris


www.akuindeed.com 

hydestone's picture
hydestone

I think you double the rising time for every 17 degrees below 70.  So if it calls for 90 minutes and your house is 53 degrees you need to rise for 3 hours.  If your house was 97 degrees you would rise for 45 minutes.

farm-girl-195's picture
farm-girl-195

So normal room temp is considered 70 degrees, thanks for the formula.  Very helpful and much appreciated! 

farm-girl-195's picture
farm-girl-195

Chris,


Thanks for the invite, I'll have to check it out.

BettyR's picture
BettyR

Where are you in East Texas? We are on the Southern Edge of the Big Thicket about halfway between Batson and Sour Lake. It's a bit nippy outside this morning.


 


By the way, one of the best ways to learn to bake good bread is to start off with a bread machine and a good recipe, but only use the bread machine to knead the dough. Bake it in your oven yourself. That way you can learn what the bread dough is supposed to look and feel like which is a big thing to learn.

farm-girl-195's picture
farm-girl-195

We are about 2 1/2 hours north of you on 69.


Have made several loaves of whole wheat bread in the machine following the books recipes.  Have also made one batch of Pate Fermentee followed by french bread out of "The Bread Baker's Apprentice".  Just never got that rise I was looking for.  Now I know was just too cold in the house and did not give it enough time.  Machine has a "dough" setting that I may have  to experiment with until the weather warms up, I figure out how much coals I need to get the house to 70 degrees or I get an urge to spend hours watching the rise.

freerk's picture
freerk

If your house is that chilly, I would most certainly try to get acquianted with the workings of your bread machine. Lots of people here use it to rise/proof their bread, and bake it in the oven! Draft-free and perfect temp :-)


 


greetz from Amsterdam


 


Freerk

farm-girl-195's picture
farm-girl-195

Sadly I am figuring that out. There is just something very appealing in doing it myself.  Am realizing I will have to become fast friends with my machine if I want some homemade bread. LOL 

hydestone's picture
hydestone

You don't need a bread machine.  You may bake a few bricks when making it by hand but it is more satisfying and eventually you learn how the doigh should feel.


One thing that helped me was a dough rising bucket which has lines on it so you can tell when the dough has doubled or tripled.  In the BBA PR says first fermentation and cooking are responsible for most of the flavor.  Use the bucket for the first fermentation.  It seals nicely so you don't need to worry about drafts and you can tell when dough has doubled by looking at it from the side.  The buckets are 2.80 and top is 1.00 on www.Katom.com.

hydestone's picture
hydestone

Buy one of these, they are great.


Container: http://www.katom.com/144-RFS6PP190.html


Cover: http://www.katom.com/144-RFSC6PP190.html 

cpanza's picture
cpanza

I agree with the above poster - you don't need a bread machine. If it is particularly chilly in my house, I make sure I Saran Wrap the top, and then cover with kitchen towels, usually surrounding the base with them as well. Then I just find some room (a bathroom, whatever) that has a moderately warm space.Besides, if it's not that warm, you can just wait longer - it's not the time that matters, it's the volume doubling.


www.akuindeed.com


 

msgtdoug's picture
msgtdoug

Indeed... bread will rise in the refrigerator if you allow it enough time (overnight)...  And, the wonderful thing about that S-L-O-W rise is that the flavor increases.  That is the biggest reason for baking at home...  "Wonder Bread" is proofed and baked in no time, but it doesn't have any flavor!