The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hi From Alabama!!!

kathygreen's picture
kathygreen

Hi From Alabama!!!

Hi, I am a pretty new baker in Alabama...looking for fellow bakers from Alabama.  I have successfully made French baguettes, Country French Loafs, pizza doughs (Roma and Naplese styles).  Looking to share ideas and use others.

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Kathy,


I'm a Michigander, actually, but lived in Shelby County, southeast of Birmingham for 4 years, '88-'92.


There are other AL posters here who will no doubt chime in soon.  In the meantime, sit a spell and make yourself at home.


Paul

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

I have been on TFL for a while. It is a wonderful place with great folks who will contribute to your learning in a great way. I look forward to hearing from you too. Hey Paul...waving to you. Caroline

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

all the way from summery South Africa.  Y'know, when we moved to Alabama, my brother-in-law asked "Could you have moved any further south?"  I guess we have answered that question in the affirmative!


Paul

siuflower's picture
siuflower

I live in Hoover, AL and welcome.


 


Siuflower

Davefs's picture
Davefs

Howdy from Hoover also!


I've only been baking about a year so still a lot to learn,but what delicious lessons(usually)!

JoeV's picture
JoeV

Hi kathygreen from Abalama. (sic). Glad to hear you're on the search for new recipes as well as sharing your recipes with us. Since you already make baguettes, here is a different presentation method for the same dough...Epi style, which looks like sheaves of wheat. When your dough is ready to go in the oven and your toppings are on the dough (if you use toppings at all), take your kitchen shears and cut the dough on a steep angle (about 45 degrees), but not all the way through the dough. With the shears still in place, gently grab the dough in front ot the shears end rotate it off to the side. Move back about 1-1/2" and do the same, but this time rotate the dough to the opposite side. You end up with a baguette that is not only attractive on your table, but which is ready made to tear off a piece of bread rather than cutting it. I make these frequently for appetizer parties, and roll my dough into much smaller tubes than standard baguettes so you have tiny pieces to tear off to go with an appetizer. Also remember that the sky is the limit on toppings, including all kinds of seeds, herbs and fresh minced onion. You are limited only by your imagination and personal tastes.


Enjoy!