The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

pandoros in the snow

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freerk's picture
freerk

pandoros in the snow

My second batch of pandoros came out very nice as well! I used Glezer's recipe. It was amazing how difficult it was to find cocoa-butter in this town. Especially when you know that Amsterdam is the #1 harbour for shipping the stuff around the world... In certain weather conditions we can smell the coacoa from our balcony, but for buying the cocoa-butter I ended up going out of town to a very old fashioned drugstore in a nearby city. The oddities of globalization, I guess... Anyway. here it is: my second batch of pandoros!


If you want to see more; check my "year in baking"-slideshow here


Comments

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Thank you for sharing your photo gallery, freerk!  Beautiful baking!


Sylvia


 

freerk's picture
freerk

Hey there Sylvia!


 


Thanks a bunch :-)


 


Making things look and feel "X-massy" is really easy here at the moment; we are going towards our first official "white christmas" in a decade or so; lots of snow, ice cold, just the way we old world northerners like it ;-)


 


Have a wonderful time!


 


Freerk

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Really nice pandoros. Congratulations.


 

freerk's picture
freerk

Hey Nico,


 


Thank you Nico: coming from an Italian (I saw you are in Bologna) this compliment means a lot to me ;-) I haven't tasted this batch yet, but if they are anything like the first two, I'm doing fine :-)


Going out to get some Vino Santo now!


 


Have a wonderful X-mas (I was in Rome last week and it was snowing there as well, amazing! what a winter it is this year)


 


greet from Amsterdam


 


Freerk

wally's picture
wally

Really enjoyed the slideshow and the variety of baking your'e doing.


Happy baking in 2011!


Larry

freerk's picture
freerk

I always love browsing through other TFL-member's "favorites", and you have a nice selection; my list for 2011 is getting longer rapidly :-)

EvaB's picture
EvaB

didn't play the slide show as it loaded to slowly even with my high speed connection, can't stand to sit for a minute for each new picture to load.


Loved the cupcakes, they looked very nice, and the pictures of your pandoro were beautiful, I just make plain old fruitcakes,and am happy when they disappear.


This year I made Tortiere or French Candaian Pork Pies and while the were delicious, the crust was a pain, don't know what happened as I can make pie crust in my sleep, but that came out very hard to roll. Weird. Tasted good though.

freerk's picture
freerk

Thanks for the compliment Eva!


The crust i used for the cupcakes is from Amsterdam's most famous patissier; Cees Holtkamp. I have his formula for his tarte tatin crust, and that turned out to be the perfect dough to make these very thin cupcakes. If you are interested, I can send it your way :-)


Good to hear that my gallery is such a slow loader. They come from a server in the US, and I often wonder how fast the pics load on other machines. Funnily enough they load here in the proverbial jiffy.


I will look into it to see how I can make them load faster!


thanks again


 


Freerk

EvaB's picture
EvaB

I always like to encourage people who try to bake anything, as its better than always buying stuff from the commercial places, which I am sure try to do their best but they are beset with rules and regs and the stuff needs to keep etc.


I am interested in your name, as my uncles last name was Freer, his family had been here for many years since sometime in the 1600's actually, or rather in the US, as his family is like mine in moving across the country and moving to Canada in the 1900's.


We also have a Dutch friend who moved here after the second world war, and he is an interesting fellow, having served in the Dutch army and wound up serving in Maylasia in Borneo I know that is not its name now, but then it was. He is a highly decorated vetern, but only speaks of it in general terms.


My uncle the one with the name, was also a vetern, and served in Holland in the Canadian army at the liberation, so he was always interested in the country and how it was doing.


I would like the recipe if you can send it, as I collect things and they look so nice, and would like to try them, being as how they are a fancy food. I like to bake much more than cook! :) Although its not good for me. I am going to try making custard tarts with eggnog (the commercial stuff but hey) so have to go roll crust that I have in the fridge waiting.


 

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk,


Great pandoros!


Having been in Amsterdam. albeit a while ago, it seemed absurd, though, that with all the goods on offer you would need to go to a drugstore in another city for cocoa butter! 


Glad you were able to get some and make such lovely creations.


I am hoping to make pandoro with lamination. I have been able to obtain a bundt pan but not got a pandoro mould yet. I see you did it very successfully in both. Can I ask what is the secret of forming the dough properly in the bundt pan, given that it is not a batter and is placed normally in the pandoro mould in the form of a soft ball? Do you have to form the ends to make a ring in the bundt pan and if so how? 


With thanks for your consideration of this question, 


Best wishes, Daisy_A

freerk's picture
freerk

Hey daisy, Murphy's law works here as well: a day after I went out of town to get the coacoa-butter I found a place just around the corner that sells it as well..... To answer your question: this dough (the Glezer recipe) comes out more like a thick batter than a dough, so basically it's a matter of pouring it in the mold, and gravity will take care of the rest. I'm intrigued by your lamination-pandoro. Do you have a recipe that you would be willing to share? My guess is that with lamination you really need the high pandoro mold (the star form) so you can just put the laminated dough in without worrying about draping it around the tube of the bundt pan. If they are not available where you are, you might get lucky looking for the Portuguese variety, which seem to be more available somehow. I got lucky in a kitchen store here in Amsterdam, although paying 30€ for a piece of aluminum seemed a bit excessive. Looking forward to hearing more about the laminated pandoro! Greets from Amsterdam Freerk

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk,


Thanks for getting back to me.


Glad you found cocoa butter. It made sense they would have it in Amsterdam and not only in some separate chocolate houses like in the C18!


The laminated pandoro comes from an Italian pastry chef called Papum, recommended by nico. I tried the panettone based on his formula and it seemed really sound so I am looking into his pandoro formula. It is on this link http://www.cookaround.com/yabbse1/showthread.php?t=146110&p=2451495#post2451495


I'm interested in lamination as part of Italian tradition, but also as I have no mixer so am inclined to that rather than the higher intensity mixing in the Glezer formula, although I can see hers turns out very well!


In the UK there seem to be fewer home bakers. We can get equipment for traditional UK style cakes but not so much continental. The only pandoro mould I could see was online from Scotland. However I should probably try the smaller Italian and Portuguese places in London as they often have things for their local communities. Thanks for the Portuguese suggestion! 


I found a tip on Susan at Wild Yeast's blog that might be helpful. When preparing rosca de reyes she takes a dough ball and makes a hole in the middle then stretches it into a circular shape. Might try that.


Some more novice bundt pan user question. I'm thinking you wait until dough is about 1" below the top and then bake upside down, that is with the open top of the pan upwards? Did you bake straight onto the oven shelf or on a tin and did you preheat the oven or not?


With thanks for your responses.


Greetings from the UK, Daisy_A

freerk's picture
freerk

Actually, I let them rise just about to rim or a little above even. It creates a nice effect on both the moulds, but especially on the 'original'; the final push it gets in the oven (yes, they are baked upside down) makes it curl around the mould in a very pretty way if you get it right. I baked them, according to Glezer, in a preheated oven, lowest rack. This batch I baked on stone (too lazy to take them out), and they came out quite nice. I saw your Pannetone! Beautiful! Definitely going to try that one in the near future. About making the hole in the laminated dough to fit the Bundtpan: If you can manage to form a ring after laminating the dough without the butter "breaking out", it might work. Sounds tricky though; your butter may "melt out" during the bake (as has happened to me so many times whilst baking croissants) and could create a greasy mess on the bottom of your Bundt pan. Only one way to find out :-) trial and error! Happy baking! Freerk

geraintbakesbread's picture
geraintbakesbread

Hi Daisy


There are Pandoro moulds available at this UK site, tin ones in 500g & 1kg & 2kg capacities, plus a range of silicon moulds:


http://www.inoxss.co.uk/index.php?main_page=advanced_search_result&search_in_description=1&keyword=pandoro


Best wishes


Geraint

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk, Hi Geraint,


Mmm, good point freerk. I hadn't thought through the logistics of trying to pull a apart a laminated dough. Not the best idea..


Hi Geraint - think I might spring for the proper pan from inoxss. Was only place I could find them as well and they seem to have good prices at the moment :-). Thanks for the link. See they also have colomba moulds so pretty well set for continental baking.


Thanks both for the advice.


Best wishes, Daisy_A