The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

betty crocker bread

yikes's picture
yikes

betty crocker bread

Okay, my first loaf yesterday came out as expected, yuck.  The crust was colored well enough and the loaf fell out of the greased pan, the interior was damp and chewy.  The loaf had not risen enough, due to my not knowing how much yeast to put in.  So I need to ask. in a two loaf white bread batch, how much yeast do I put in (Fleischman dry activated yeast in a jar).  The cook book calls for two 1/4 oz packs, so I put in 1/2 teaspoon yeast.  Is that correct or only half of what is needed?


I did add garlic salt to the bread (did not have garlic powder) and that came out pretty good, had just a hint of garlic.


I also made croissants and had the same problem (not knowing how much yeast to use) but also had a problem with rolling out the dough.  I used the handles on my wife's rolling pin and I think I broke it, so I just stopped using the handles, but getting the dough to roll out to the 25x10x1/4 inch evenly was tough.


 I used two cookie sheets to bake.  The bottom sheet burned the croissants and the top sheet had very dark tops.  I guess one at a time, huh.  Rollin up the croissants, I did not pinch the tip into the body so some of the tips curled up when baking, some did not.


What I made was not edible and gave my wife and I something to laugh at (she a little more than me, though!)  Maybe today it will come out better.


 

swtgran's picture
swtgran

1 pkg. dry activated yeast is equal to 2 1/4 teaspoons.

yikes's picture
yikes

so in a two loaf batch, I would put in 4 1/2 teaspoons?

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

You would use 2-1/4 teaspoons for a 2 loaf recipe.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/faqs/baking/yeast


Note: the last comment looks like it applies directly to your recipe.

yikes's picture
yikes

I am a newby. 


I am trying to learn.


The basic bread from "lessons" here, says three cups flour (I know how to measure that), 2 teaspoon of salt (I know how to measure that) 1 1/8 cup of water (I know how to measure that), and finally 2 teaspoon of dry active yeast.  I do not know how to measure that.  Because there is a difference in the envelope packaged dry yeast and this jar of dry yeast, I do not understand what quantity to use.


In two weeks it won't make any difference.  By then I will know what I am doing and will no longer need to ask questions here.  BUT, today I do not know what I am doing and therefore the questions.


One hour ago I blended the ingredients, kneaded the dough, put the dough in a covered bowl and am now waiting for a rise.  It has not risen,,,,maybe just a little.  I used two teaspoon of yeast,  so as to follow the lesson.  The temperature of the water was 105.

proth5's picture
proth5

the nature of your question.


To measure yeast you use a teaspoon and measure as you would any dry ingredient.


Frankly, most folks on these pages (myself included) have long abandoned the volumetric measure in favor of the faster/easier/more accurate weight measures - so it's tough for me to deal in volumes.


In my extensive experience there is no difference between the same type of yeast if it comes in a jar or in an envelope, so the nature of your confusion is unclear.


Be aware that most formulas on these pages are written for "instant" yeast.  According to your post, you are using active dry yeast.  Active dry yeast should be dissolved in water prior to incorporating it in a recipe (usually about 1/4 cup of water to for a couple of teaspoons of yeast) - although some folks add it directly to the dry ingredients with little problem.  Also, active dry yeast contains a larger percentage of dead yeast cells - so often a little more (that 1/4 tsp mentioned above) is used than instant yeast.


105 is a little warm, in my hands, for the water, but should be OK for the yeast.  If the water is too warm, it will kill the yeast. 


If you have no more questions after two weeks - you are a better baker than I'll ever be.  Perhaps.


Good luck!

Jo_Jo_'s picture
Jo_Jo_

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20981/newbie-bread-not-rising


This post has a real good explanation about proofing/proving your yeast.  It is just one of many really good examples on this site of how to make bread.  I do suggest reading through all the lessons on making bread, and then to follow some of the video links that show you some really good methods.


Just a little tip, if you think of yeast as little beasties trying to eat up all the sugars in the dough and that they increase the more they eat producing lots of bubbles, then it might help you understand that even if you only put a very small amount of yeast in the dough it will eventually rise up to the point you would end up with a nice size loaf.  Most of us do not have the patience to wait that long, so we increase the number of the beasties by adding a larger quantity of yeast at the beginning to make our bread. 


I made a "Poolish" last night, it is simply 3 cups flour and water and two small pinches of yeast (looked like a wet dough and was rather sticky). I did this at 9pm and it is now 10 am and it has hardly risen, but as it sits and rises slowly it will increase the flavor of the whole wheat in my bread and make the loaf taste better.  I will wait for the yeast to make it nice and bubbly, which will probably be sometime this afternoon.  Eventually it will get to the point it is nice and fluffy, and then I will use it in a bread recipe as the starter and add more yeast to make it rise in a couple hours. 


I suggest a little experiment, just so you understand how the yeast will work for you and how it reacts.  Take a small bowl, put a cup of flour into it and 1/2 cup of water then just a pinch of yeast, stir it up really good.  A very small pinch, and watch what it does over the day, eventually it will get to a fully risen product and then it will say "there's nothing left to eat" and the entire thing will deflate.  When you make bread you want to catch it when it has not quite risen to that point because it will do it's last little bit of rising in the oven.


Hope this helps....

yikes's picture
yikes

If there is no difference between envelope and jar yeast, then my questions are stupid and I sincerely apologize.  The label on the jar indicates otherwise.


My comment about not having questions after two weeks is predicated on the idea that baking is an experimentors ideal world.  It is that idea that caused me to choose baking as a hobby.  I certainly did not mean to imply that I would be good at it, just that I would have fun with it.

proth5's picture
proth5

Yikes,


That's a couple of times now that you have made reference to something amiss with the yeast label.  I actually checked my jar of Fleischmann's (although it is instant yeast) and could find nothing wrong.


Perhaps if you told us what you thought you saw, the folks here on TFL could help clear up what seems to be a misunderstanding on your part.


Let us know.

yikes's picture
yikes

Hi Proth5, it is not what I thought I saw as I am holding the jar right now, it is what I am seeing (present tense).  It is not an error on my part.  It is an intentional misprint on the label.  I have contacted the mfg. and will get it corrected.  No one else need go through this frustration.  Everyone just needs to be aware that fleischman is mis-labeling their product.

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Yikes, why not just be honest and upfront and quote from the label whatever it is that upsets you so much?


Innuendo and mysterious statements that the company "intentionally" misprinted something (although I have no idea how you could possibly arrive at such a conclusion), leads one to question your own credibility.

yikes's picture
yikes

Hi lindyD, I tried that on my first post here.  But that post was moved somewhere.


But the bottom line is that I did not come here to create problems, I came to learn how to bake a loaf of bread.  Did not seem too complicated when I first thought about it.

LindyD's picture
LindyD

I believe your original thread was deleted because Floyd asked you to be specific about the charges you were making against Fleischmann, writing that if you weren't, he would delete that thread. 


Good move to follow your bottom line and concentrate on learning about bread.  The TFL Handbook is quite helpful, as are the videos - and of course, making bread and learning from your mistakes.

yikes's picture
yikes

Being a newby, I do not know who Floyd is.  I never saw any post asking what you allege.  But of course I was busy trying to figure out how much yeast to use.  And it has taken two days and all this typing to get to this point.

proth5's picture
proth5

Yikes,


Floydm is the individual who created and kindly maintains this website.  When he makes a polite request, I, personally consider that he has done so much for us that I can honor his requests.


I am going to repeat that the Fleischmann's yeast company is a reputable one and I have no evidence that they have mis labled any of their products, nor will I believe you without further substantiation.


The eyes may see something, but the brain may mis interpret.  Especially if one is in a hurry or doesn't have the requisite level of experience.


But you will not tell us what you saw, and we cannot find it for ourselves.  So no one can help you - although we keep trying.


Good luck with your new hobby.

yikes's picture
yikes

received from consumer affairs at ACH Foods:


We sincerely regret your disappointing experience with Fleischmann's Jar of Yeast. We strive daily to see that all our products meet the high-quality standards you have come to expect from us. We did have some labels that were mislabeled with the amount of yeast found in one package. The correct amount should be 2 1/4 teaspoons and not 1/4 teaspoons. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Good to know actually.  There might be a few other jars out there throwing new home bakers off in their bakes.   Some of us will be looking at our jars a little more closely.


Had you mentioned exactly what you saw on your label, we could have compared it to other labels and showed a correction sooner.  One of the first things I did after reading your first post about the yeast was to pull up a visual of the jar on the net looking thru the "Images" section for "off" labels.  One thought... Just like a mis-stamped penny, this jar may become a collector's item.  Might want to go get another jar and leave it sealed to sell for $$$ some day.


Mini


By-the-way    I have the 1981 Fifth Printing of the Betty Crocker Cookbook.  It was my first cookbook.

proth5's picture
proth5

So, what have we learned here (this is what I have been encouraged to ask when faced with a bread disaster)?


When asking questions, or making posts, be specific.  If your first post had said that the jar was labeled with 1/4 tsp equals one packet of yeast, experienced US bakers would have supported your position that the jar was mis labeled.  You would have savedyourself having a post deleted, and generally had a better introduction to the forum.


Why you felt the need not to post that information is, again, most puzzling.


But I still very much doubt the mistake on the label was deliberate.  They are probably dealing with a small nightmare right now and telling home bakers to use less yeast than they should hardly benefits Fleischmann's in any way.


I don't know if the jar will become a collectable, but you might ask for free yeast...


 

yikes's picture
yikes

It does help JO JO, thank you.  And thank you to the other responders.


Frustrations rise more quickly than bread.  But the dough in the bowl in rising.  I punched it down and am letting it rise again, now.


So all is right with the world.  It's holiday time, it's snowing outside, my wife is sewing a head on one of her animals and there is a smell of bread in the home.

Jo_Jo_'s picture
Jo_Jo_

I enjoy baking because it requires me to have patience but it also is an experiment.  Each ingredient has a different purpose, and causes the bread to become an entirely different creation.  I particularly enjoy making sourdough, where I use the four basic ingredients:  Starter, flour, water, salt.  It amazes me every time to watch how such a simple recipe can create such wonderful tasting bread. 


I have found that knowing how the dough should feel and look is more important than actual measurements, at least in my kitchen, but at the same time weighing the flour and water can help you come much closer to the end result you want.  I use tsp, tbsp, etc for the smaller amounts of ingredients, but the water and flour I measure with my scale.  I have found that when I scoop my flour it weighs almost exactly the same every time, but it's no where near what I find in most recipes.  This means though that once I know approximately how much I really need to make the dough feel like it should, then I can still use the measuring cups if I want to.  I just get more accurate results with the scale.  I write down exactly what I put in each time, so that I can recreate a great loaf or change my recipe a little bit the next time.


I really think of it as a science experiment.  I am constantly experimenting with different things, adding a little bit more water or flour or whatever keeps me busy for the day!  Oh, and then there are the things you can do to create different types of crust, or unusual things you can add to the breads, or even simply how you present them (braids, snails, etc).  It's all so much fun to play with....

yikes's picture
yikes

well,,,day two and close but no cigar.  The dough rose and I punched it, kneaded it, put it in the bowl and let it rise again, punched it, kneaded it and put it in the loaf pan.  I let it rise again (about 30 minutes), but not enough.  I was counting on a good in the oven quick rise, but that did not happen.  I brushed water on the top put it in the oven and waited.  The crust is about 1/8 inch thick and beautifully colored, but the interior is still damp and chewy.  The smell is great though.


So for the first weekend, I have learned a lot that will stay with me forever.  It is so important to get the basics right.  Another 10 tries and I may get a good one.  Genious is the ability to do it right the first time.

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

You will need to let the dough guide you as to when it's risen enough to be baked.  Recipes are not carved in stone--they can't take into account temperatures in your own environment.  You need to learn to be able to judge when the dough has sufficiently risen for baking.  The easiest is the "finger poke test"--poke it with your finger and if the indentation stays or fills in very slowly, the dough has risen enough to go on to the next stage. 


As for baking, bread is done when it's done, not when the recipe says it should be done--the recipe cannot account for variations in temperature in your oven either.  Sounds like you need to get an oven thermometer and check your oven in various spots to see if it is heating to the temperature you think. 


The best way to assure that bread is done on the inside is to get an instant read thermometer ($10 or less wherever they sell cooking utensils, even in that aisle in your local grocery store).  Lean doughs (containing only flour, water, salt, and yeast)  are done when the internal temperature of the bread measures 205 to 210 F, enriched doughs are done at about 185 to 190 degrees F.  Insert the thermometer in the center of the bread from an inconspicuous spot and give it time to come up to full temperature (not so instant, actually). 


Breads with higher hydration levels, in particular, can give the outward appearance of being done when they are not.  The thermometer is the only way to be certain.


BTW, bread is like the game of "Go" ("a moment to learn, a lifetime to master") or music.  It looks simple and many people can bake a decent loaf, just like many people can play chopsticks on the piano, but there is a great deal more to it than can be mastered in 2 weeks time.  That's why this website exists and there are so many learned people here who have become, in essence, bread scholars.  And, it's why it is a great hobby, because there is always more to learn and more challenges to attempt. 


You are correct that there's a LOT to learn.  Most importantly, let the dough and the bread tell you when they are done. 

sheffield's picture
sheffield (not verified)

YIKES!!!

amolitor's picture
amolitor

Here's the secret about yeast:


It doesn't really matter how much you use! If you use too much, your bread will taste yeasty (but that's probably 2 or 3 times as much as the recipe calls for). If you use far too little, your bread will never rise enough (but that would be less than half or a quarter of what the recipe calls for).


All you need to do is get into the right general area, you can be off by a factor of 2 or 3 and it won't matter! If it calls for 1 tsp, then 1/2 tsp, or 2 tsp will be fine. 1/4 tsp will probably work too, but everything will be quite slow. 4 tsp will probably make your bread taste yeasty.


What DOES matter is that you let the dough rise enough. You should generally be letting it rise to the point that a "poke test" succeeds -- poke the dough with a wetted finger (so it doesn't stick) and make a hole half an inche deep. If it fills back in very slowly (5-10 seconds) you're at the right place. If it never fills, you've let it ise too long! If it fills in immediately, you need to let it rise more.


You should always poke-test your dough immediately after you're done kneading, so you can tell how it's changing as it rises.


Your yeast jar may have been correctly labeled. There are several kinds of dried yeast, and amounts are not always equivalent. Yeast that's been sitting around for longer is less potent than yeast that's fresh. Yeast that has been poorly stored is also less potent. If you're rising your dough when it's warm, you may need to use less yeast -- and so on and so on! This is why I don't worry about being accurate with yeast, and instead I just pay attention to my dough.


You might make notes as you make each recipe, so you can repeat it. If it took 1 hour and 50 minutes to rise with 1 teaspoon of your yeast in your kitchen at such and such and such a temperature on Monday, it'll probably take 1 hour and 50 minutes again if you do it on Friday. YOU can measure this stuff, since it's your yeast, and your kitchen, but the recipe book an only estimate.


 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

With volume recipes a useful tool in the kitchen is a cheap set of measuring spoons.  They come usually in a set of 4 with  1 Tablespoon (Tbs)  1 Teaspoon (tsp)  1/2 Teaspoon and 1/4 Teaspoon.


If you don't have a set... then it's more guess work.  A teaspoon from a dinner set might be useful to use as a teaspoon (spoons vary) if you scoop into the yeast and draw a flat edge across the surface leveling the yeast.  The rule of thumb is scoop and draw to measure.  A tablespoon contains 3 teaspoons and one can also use a large spoon like a dinner soup spoon.    Now if you happen to have some medicine spoons around from cough syrup or small cups that went on top, they might also be labeled with teaspoons or milliliters.  One teaspoon of water would be 5 ml.  One tablespoon of water would be about 15 ml.  :)


Not much to it once you get the hang of it.  I think a beer cap would be about a teaspoon too.

RobynNZ's picture
RobynNZ

Goodmorning


Sorry I don't know your recipe, (I guess the Betty Crocker recipe you are using is familiar to the USA contributors here), but when I read the following I wondered how many rises, how much kneading is in the instructions:



The dough rose and I punched it, kneaded it, put it in the bowl and let it rise again, punched it, kneaded it and put it in the loaf pan.  I let it rise again (about 30 minutes), but not enough.  I was counting on a good in the oven quick rise, but that did not happen.



No doubt the Betty Crocker recipe is an older style one (these days many of us do little kneading, do not 'punch', rely more on autolyse and stretch & folds and handle the dough gently) however even for such a method that is a lot of punching and kneading.   As your dough has three rises, perhaps the yeast has run out of omph  (read 'food'). Is this what the instructions in the Betty Crocker recipe tell you to do?  Some recipes do use three rises, this may be one of them. 


Most older style simple yeast recipes would normally involve


1. Mix


2. Knead


3. Rise (first rise) (you'll see it referred to as bulk fermentation)


4. Punch down 


5. Shape


6. Second rise (Proofing, in your case in a loaf pan) (and yes, use the finger poke test others have shared to be sure the dough is 'just right' to go in the oven)


7. Bake


It would be my recommendation that you take a look through the section in the banner at the top of this page titled "book reviews" and then go to your library and borrow a recently published book, say from 2000 onwards, that includes a section on bread baking basics, not just recipes. Or perhaps go to the King Arthur baking blog in which step by step photos guide new bread bakers, and the comments section after each blog also contains a lot of helpful information . Here's a link which might be of interest, and there is plenty more there in the archives too:


http://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2010/08/25/curious-about-yeast-bread-old-traditions-meet-new-techniques/


Robyn (who despite decades making bread, continues to enjoy learning)

proth5's picture
proth5

Ah, Betty!  She was the first person to tell me how to bake bread (and I still find the shaping method described in the original "Betty Crocker Picture Cookbook" (or close to that title) to be the best I've ever used for panned sandwich loaves. (and I've used a few...) The old original was one of the first cookbooks to try and put "science" into the area of home cooking and does contain explanations that are accurate, if somewhat elementary, explanations of yeast baking techniques.


A typical Betty C recipe will have  kneading, a first rise, a literal "punch down", a second rise, then a shape and then a final proof.  Very similar (except for the violence of the "punch") to the current trend in artisan methods.


A pretty smart gal, my Betty. She is not up to date, but she is far from a bad foundation.  I had just a few bad habits to unlearn, but she taught me the fundamentals that so many teachers since have built upon.


But her "French" bread technique has its shortcomings.  Serious, serious shortcomings. (Although back in 60's and early 70's it was better than anything else I had available to me.) From time to time I consider doing some "retro" baking and seeing if I can goose up those venerable recipes using marginaly enhanced techniques.


I have never seen one of Betty's recipes call for additional kneading after the punching down.  That may have been what I call "operator error."


Always nice to think about my Betty - she started it all for me...

RobynNZ's picture
RobynNZ

Hi Pat


Thanks for the background on the Betty Crocker bread method & the cookbook.


Betty Crocker's name appears on cake pre-mix packets in our supermarkets, I'd always assumed it was a marketing name. Wikipedia confirmed this for me, but just as I genuinely believe in Santa, I guess Betty is alive in the hearts of her fans.


Trust you are getting closer to completing your Christmas gifts, a big job, but I'm sure really appreciated. 


Cheers, Robyn

amolitor's picture
amolitor

Yes, "Betty Crocker" is just a branding thing. However, that was the brand name applied to some of the first cookbooks that were backed up by an actual test kitchen!


The 1950s era Betty Crocker Cookbook was a very serious effort at teaching people (ok, teaching women) how to cook. It's still one of the most well-organized cookbooks I have ever seen, and it has a huge amount of surrounding information (substitutions, techniques, and so on). It lacks only a good index to be perfect!


There may have been cookbooks earlier than that one that were backed up by a test kitchen, but not many, and none nearly so popular.


 

proth5's picture
proth5

You mean...you mean...Betty isn't REAL....


:>)


Oof.  This year this thing I do for money is really getting in the way of holiday treat making.  I did finish up the traditional "Brown Cookies" in a land speed record of 11 hours (not including the mixing and chilling of the dough - and not to forget the time to render the lard...) start to finish.  And with the mini spiral, I have finally found a mixer that will actually mix that large mass of stiff dough (hurray!) Now, if I only had a sheeter to help with the rolling, I could double my output.


I expanded the caramel line this year with "Chipotle" - smooth and creamy with just a hint of burn.


Only one thing left to go and that is the home made marshmallows.  I am pondering if I have it in me to dip them in chocolate.  They are good on their own, but a fiori de sicila or peppermint marshmallow dipped in dark chocolate is a thing of beauty.   We'll see.


Hope your holidays are joyous!


Pat 

RobynNZ's picture
RobynNZ

Hi again


Well Pat has explained that there are indeed 3 rises in the Betty C method, but that you maybe a little enthusiastic when it comes to extra kneading (and therefore losing the CO2 the yeasts have been making for you).


Another thing stood out in your OP, and that was salt. You said 



I did add garlic salt to the bread (did not have garlic powder) and that came out pretty good, had just a hint of garlic.



Did you add extra salt to make up for the lack of garlic powder?  Too much salt inhibits yeast activity. Best just to use the same weight of garlic salt as salt.


And what temperature are you doing your rises/final proof at? Yeast works well when cosy, do you put the dough in a warm spot?


Have you made any more bread? Were you able to observe the dough and get a better feel for when it was ready to move from stage to stage, following the advice tendered here?


Robyn

proth5's picture
proth5

Ok, I don't mean to sound unhelpful in my other posts but you keep throwing me with the yeast thing. And while I find your attitude about that most puzzling - I've just noticed a couple of things that folks haven't mentioned on this thread that may be at the very root of your problem.


So, you are baking panned bread - usually the "lean" doughs like the one in the "TFL lessons" are not baked in a loaf pan, but rather are shaped and baked free standing.  For a loaf in a pan, I would actually use the Betty Crocker basic white bread as it is a reliable recipe and contains some of the enriching ingredients that one expects in a panned bread.  


Anyway, what you are getting sounds very much like:


-Oven too hot - Have you checked the recipe and your actual oven temp? A too hot oven will make a thick crust and underbake the interior of the loaf. You can bake longer, but you will just get a hard, thick crust.


-Thin and shiny loaf pan - That's the kind that are sold so many places or people have in their attic or garage.  If you are using metal, you want a heavy pan with a dull finish.  Those shiny loaf pans will make a thick crust and an underbaked interior.


On to generalities:


-Yeast treatment - you seem to be using active dry yeast using a method and a measurement that is more suited to instant yeast.  Although this may not cause a problem, it may cause a problem and will cause your rise times to be longer.  Not to contradict the gentle poster who says yeast measurement does not matter - it does (I see different results when I increase or decrease yeast amounts, but I am working on the last 10% these days and I measure all of my ingredients by weight and have a higher dependence on timings than most home bakers) - but probably not on your first few loaves.  But rise amount does.  You need to let the dough double per the recipes. If you mistreat your yeast, the bread will take longer to rise.


-Flour measurement - this is why many of us favor weight measures.  You don't describe how you are measuring your flour.  You should stir flour slightly, spoon it  in into your "dry ingredients" measuring cup (yes, there are two types of measuring cups - one for dry ingredients and one for liquid - that's why I love my scale) and level the top with a straight edged tool.  This method will give you close to the "ideal" flour measurement.  If you shake the flour or otherwise pack it in your dough will be too dry.  And in a very dry dough yeast will take longer to get the dough to rise.


-Humility - seriously.  Read the recipe.  Read it twice.  Understand all the steps before you start. Follow them.  You may be a very smart person or prominent in your former field of endeavor, but this seems to be something very new to you.  If you are really baking from Betty Crocker (and I see nothing wrong with that) the method written is very specific and there are pictures of each step (Some of us bake from books that just give lists of ingredients and the instructions "short mix" or "Improved mix" - which tells us exactly what we need to do, but you don't seem to be there, yet).  The recipes are very reliable. I started bread baking as a child, and I could do it (first time out the gate) because I followed the directions.  Then I started working with the big dogs of baking and let my confidence in my own abilities and experiences blind me to what they had to teach - until shortly into the adventure I got my come uppance (not pretty and no, I won't talk about it).  Do it the easy way. Listen first.  Talk later. 


Hope this helps and good luck with your new hobby.


 

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

why anyone is bothering to answer this person's initial post. He made his " first" loaf EVER of bread and a batch of croissants. Neither turned out . Duh....why do you think that might be ???? How many bakers make their very first loaf of bread and oh yes a batch of croissants on the same first EVER baking day ??? 


Come on...this is the most bogus post I have ever seen on here and I have seen some doozies. I baked my very first bread in the mid 70's. I used the packets of Fleishmann's yeast. I had never used a packet of yeast in my life. I followed the directions exactly.  It turned out perfectly. I have the same packets to this very day. If I use the recipes on them....guess what??? they still turn out perfectly. 


This poster is doing this , as many do on other forums I participate in, to get a "rise" out of you. Do not" fall" for this. Sorry for the unintended puns. c

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

The first yeast post was also full if indicators that cried "stay away."  Fleischmann misspelled (easy to do, you did it too) a unspecified rant, even the name of the yeast on the label reversed.  All negative attention grabbers including the name, Yikes.  Then again... the croissants on this topic is a big jump for a beginner but chances are good that half of a double loaf rcipe was made into rolls that resemble croissants in their shape only, for variety.   Simply, two people and two loaves is too boring! 


Any man who starts a hobby and asks his wife to pick up the yeast must be middle aged or retired as she knows her way about the store and he's man enough to admit it.  This topic also started out with lots of negativism but later... humor.   Frustration is so.   I love the line  "Frustrations rise more quickly than bread."   Yikes, can I quote you on my apron?  I love it!   I hope the baking isn't suffering from being snowed in.  Start another topic, and hope we stay on subject.


Mini