The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Seven Grain Mix

hydestone's picture
hydestone

Seven Grain Mix

I picked up a few pounds of 7 Grain Mix from a farm stand and am looking to incorporate it into a recipe and am looking for suggestions.  The mix includes: hard red wheat, soft white wheat, triticale, rye, oats, barley and oats??  They listed oats twice...maybe its a 6 grain.  I also have a bag or cracked wheat and steel cut oats. 

clazar123's picture
clazar123

If they are berries, either grind them or semicook them to incorporate some into a known recipe. You may need to adjust water/flour a little.


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See if this is helpful:


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20163/great-whole-grain-cereal-loaf


Read thru the thread to the Multigrain Bread 2 recipe and also pay attention to the comments about the dough being sticky and how to handle it. Delicious bread but the different grains have different characterisitcs. If you don't develop the gluten enough, you'll end up with a dense,gummy loaf. So really mix/knead! and you'll end up with a wonderful loaf.


 


Matt H's picture
Matt H

Agreed-- cook it up like rice or porridge, and then mix it right into your dough. If it's a rice consistency, then you won't have to alter the liquid much, but if there's a lot of added liquid, you'll have to reduce other liquids some, or add a bit more of everything else, flour and salt being the most important ones to scale up.


Check out recipes also for "struan" on this site:


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/recipes/struan


Most of all, enjoy! It will make a wonderfully toothsome bread, with really interesting texture. And, it'll be a nutritional powerhouse!

hydestone's picture
hydestone

I don't believe they are berries.  I will take a look at the links provided above and see what I can come up with.

judyinnm's picture
judyinnm

Seven grain bread is a staple in our house - every week it must be made, for us and the neighbor, and my son.  I add some flax seed - I like the dark ones, but also include the light ones- to increase nutritional elements; and it deepens the texture and color of the bread. 

hydestone's picture
hydestone

Judyinnm, flaxseeds sound like a great addition.  Would you mind posting your recipe?

judyinnm's picture
judyinnm

My recipe is a variation (very minor changes) of Rose Levy Beranbaum's "Tyrolean Ten-Grain Torpedo", in her  wonderful book "The Bread Bible" (The book that introduced me to the principles of making really good artisanal breads).


Sponge:  2/3 C. - (100 Grams) Bread Flour, 1/2 Tbl sp.- (4 Grams) Non-Diastatic Malt powder, 1/4 tsp. Instant yeast, 3/4 C  - (177 Grams) water.  Stir with wisk to make batter, cover, and make


Flour Mixture:  11/4 C. (200Gr) Bread Flour, 3/4 tsp. Instant Yeast, 4 tsp.- (12 gr) Vital Wheat Gluten.  Wisk together and cover sponge with it.  Allow to set at room temp for 1 hour, , then refrigerate overnight.


Soaker:  1/2 C. + 2TBL. Sp. -(100 Gr) 7-grain cereal plus flax seed mix.  1 tsp. - (6 gr) Kosher salt, 1/2 C -1 Tblsp. - (100 Gr) Hot water.  Stir to completely incorporate grains with water. cover.  cool to room temperature, and refrigerate overnight.


Mix the Dough:  with dough hook on low speed til flour is moistened.  cover and let it rest for 20 minutes.  Tear the dough into several pieces (to make it easier to incorporate the grains), add the grain-salt-water mixture, and mix on low til grains are incorporated with dough. Raise mixer speed to Medium (#4 on KA) and knead for 7 minutes.  Allow to rise til double.  Give the dough 1 or 2 stretch and folds, return to proofing container, and allow to double again.  Form into 11-inch-long by 2-inch high batard cover with light dusting of Rye flour, and allow to rise til doubled.  Slash, and bake at 450 degrees.  I use the skillet-filled-with-lava-rocks method of steaming my oven which has been pre-heated to 500+ degrees.   (Since I make this bread at least once a week, I save a small portion of the dough from each batch to add to the next batch, for additional flavor.  The few times I've allowed the "old dough" to linger in the fridge longer than a week, it has provided a hint of (not unpleasant) sourdough to my next batch. 


My friends and neighbors beg me to make this bread for them, and (voluntarily) pay me $5 a loaf - that's kinda flattering...Hope these instructions are clear and easy to follow.  Thanks for asking me to share.