The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Tiramisu

tmarz's picture
tmarz

Tiramisu

I was wondering, I am planning on making Tiramisu this weekend for a date. I noticed a few recipes add whipped egg whites to the marscarpone/egg yolk mixture, while others don't (just marcarpone/egg yolk and sugar). What do you think the difference might be?


Many of the recipes call for a pound of marscarpone, some sugar, about 6 egg yolks... If I did that, do you think I should add like 2 or 3 whipped egg whites?


Thanks


 

coffeemachine's picture
coffeemachine

here's how i make mine:


 


first make a zabaglione (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/mario-batali/zabaglione-recipe/index.html) or similar recipe, then fold in whipped mascarpone. this gives you a smooth and light mixture (you have to be constantly paying attention and whisking the zabaglione though or you might end up with scrambled eggs) and you don't end up eating raw eggs.


 


i find that the wolfgang puck recipe (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/wolfgang-puck/tiramisu-recipe/index.html) makes a decent tiramisu. i use store bought lady fingers though, as i'm lazy and i can get the "forno bonomi" ones imported from italy.


 


my italian friends have given me the thumbs up when i make tiramisu like that.


 


i've heard that you could make zabaglione with whole eggs. i personally have never tried that, but i would guess you get more like a mousse texture from the whipped egg whites. to me, tiramisu shouldn't taste like mousse. but to each his own.


 


i've also tried recipes that don't make a zabaglione first, and just use raw eggs. i would stay away from those. it's not that i'm really that concerned with salmonella, but the taste and texture is really subpar.

jenniferw's picture
jenniferw

The recipe I use sounds very similar to yours, using 3/4 c. sugar, and without the whites. But I always find that I prefer lightening the mascarpone mixture up a little bit and end up folding in some sweetened whipped cream. I suppose adding whipped whites would have a similar diluting/ lightening affect. The times I havent supplemented the zabaglione I think it sinks in too much and there isnt enough of a filling to ladyfinger ratio. Hope you find a method you like!

kallisto's picture
kallisto (not verified)

I always do my Tiramisu with seperated eggs. First, I can save time if I whip the egg whites seperately.  Secondly, I find that the result is creamier.

 

If you are very skilled, you can also try a Pate a bombe mixture, where you pour hot syrup over the egg yolks.

 

1. Whip egg yolks until you can form a ribbon

2.make a syrup with glucose, cook it to 248 degrees fahrenheit, pour it over the frothy egg yolks, while continously whipping them

3. continue whipping with your stand mixer until they have reached room temperature

4.in another bowl soften the mascarpone with a wire whisk and fold in the Pate a Bombe mixture

5. whip the cream till soft peaks and then fold it into the mascarpone mixture.

Ingredients:

  • egg yolks: 2
  • sugar      : 6 ounces / 180 gramms
  • water     :  4 ounces / 120 gramms
  • glucose/light corn syrup: 2 ounces / 60 gramms
  • mascarpone: 1 lb / 500 gramms
  • heavy cream: 1lb 8 ounces / 740 gramms

 ( source: "Professional baking" by Wayne Glissen)