The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

oatmeal bread

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Trenton_Jennings's picture
Trenton_Jennings

oatmeal bread


This is an oatmeal loaf I made last weekend.  I made it with a generous half-cup steel cut oatmeal (sold as Irish Oatmeal or Scottish Oatmeal), nearly three cups white flour and my whole-wheat sourdough starter which is actually rather mild as I culture it in the refrigerator.  The night before I make a sponge with about half the total flour and uncooked oatmeal.  The following morning I add the rest of the flour & oatmeal, knead it, shape it and let it rise several hours.  My baking stone allowed for a good crust.  I'm rather fond of it.  By the way, if you have not tried hazelnut oil on your bread I would urge you to treat yourself to a delicious alternative to butter.  Actually, I prefer the hazelnut oil to butter and the lipid profile is more salutary to health anyway.


I used GIMP to make everything but the loaf in the image black & white.


 


thanks for reading

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

wonderful.  Would you mind sharing the detailed recipe ? I love oatmeal and certainly hazelnut anything, being a transplated German :)  (Nougat, you know, grin)

Trenton_Jennings's picture
Trenton_Jennings

I will try to give you the detailed recipe though it was somewhat ad hoc at the time, so I am going on memory.


About 10 p.m. the night before I mixed a generous half cup steel cut oatmeal (not rolled oats) with about 2-3/4 cups white bread flour and one teaspoon salt.


In a bow with about a cup of water I added perhaps half a cup of my sourdough starter.  Note, if you have no sourdough wet starter then mix 1/4 dry yeast in the above flour mixture.


Add half the flour mixture to the water and mix well.  Place plastic stretch wrap over the bowl and let it ferment overnight.


The following morning about 10 a.m. check your sponge.  It should be bubbly.  If you added yeast instead of a wet sourdough starter then verify that the mixture is bubbly and fermenting well.  If it does not look vigorous enough you may mix another 1/4 teaspoon dry yeast to the remaining flour mixture.


Add the reserved flour mixture to the sponge.  Add some more water only if you need it.  Some of the more technically minded folks may ask me about hydration.  Sorry, I don't know.  I know what my dough should feel like so I do not try to measure hydration.  I intend to experiment with more slack (i.e. moist) doughs and use the slap method or fold method of kneading slack doughs, but I just haven't got around to it.  My doughs are not unwiedly sticky.  More often that not I actually bake whole wheat loaves instead of this much white, and I feel like too much hydration of a whole wheat dough is a hindrance.  I know I have digressed.


Knead the dough about ten minutes or more and shape it into a boule.  Let it rise until about supper time or until the surface begins breaking at which point the gluten can no longer hold the tension.


I baked it at 400 degrees F in a preheated oven with a baking stone for half an hour.  The long fermentation time is the key to flavor.


I am sure you will enjoy drizzling a fair amount of hazelnut oil onto a hot slice.  It was such a good combination of flavors.


- Trenton

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

Now where do I find Hazelnut oil, living in the sticks and all, hehe....