The Fresh Loaf

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Baked Glazed Ham (uncooked)

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madruby's picture
madruby

Baked Glazed Ham (uncooked)

My hubby loves my dinner rolls so I will be making them this coming holiday.  However, since we are hosting the Christmas dinner and his family will be joining us, I was asked to bake a ham to go along with my rolls (and not a traditional turkey).  I know how to cook an already cooked ham and glazing it with some syrop, jelly, or honey sauce.  I do not know how to cook an UNCOOKED ham, and then bake the glazed ham in the oven.  Can anyone offer a recipe or directions on how to cook an uncooked ham.  By the way, I have noticed that grocery stores do not sell uncooked hams but only the typical already cooked hams.  Should I go to a specialty meat store for that?  Thanks. 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

http://www.whatscookingamerica.net/Pork/Ham101.html   Sorry about the link..but the recipe is type in 'search'  Ham 101 How to cook ham


Sylvia 

madruby's picture
madruby

Sylvia, thanks for responding.  However, I went to your link and typed in Ham 101 How to cook ham in the SEARCH engine. Nothing.  I must be missing something.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

There is a lot of info here if you can get it through search.  Sorry, I can't get the direct link for you.  In the main search I typed in Ham 101 recipe and then a list comes up and click on the Ham 101 recipe..maybe someone can help to put in a direct link.  ADDED.. use the search box on  your home page

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

What makes it a ham is the curing process. 


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ham


 

Franko's picture
Franko

I'd be very reluctant to eat a commercially cured raw ham produced in North America. When I go to the market and look at imported hams v ones made in the US or Canada, it's clear that the curing is quite different between the two. Curing meat is not necessarily standard from one region or country to another, so caution and some common sense is probably the safe way to go. I'm not sure what the situation is in Europe Mini, but we've had numerous 'bad' meat recalls over the last few years here in NA, so trust in our cured meat suppliers is not exactly at a high point. Eric offers sound advice for any of us living on this side of the pond.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

There is a small ham that I have often purchased and heated.  I heat it in a pressure cooker on a trivet with sourkraut underneath...  Served with potatoes and green salad.


Can you get cured pork chops?  Also called Kasslers in Germany?  These are also very tasty.  Heat them thru and lightly brown the outside and add some stock to make... Oh my goodness! ... Red eye gravy! 


What are those stiffly mashed potatoes called that are pressed out swirly like from a pastry tube and broiled to golden in the oven?  And cured ribs!  Oh no!  I got myself started and now I can't stop thinking about all the smoked piggy cuts!  I'm doomed... because the snow chaos is crazy here!  We aren't used to getting so much snow this time of year. (Yeah, right,  but I'm not in the alps!)  (Tip: Planning a ski holiday? there's plenty!) Our low land snow comes end of January.  My skiis are calling me louder than the oven! ...and with them, I'll make it to the butcher quicker than than one can uncan a ham.  I also have a few tüchtig neighbors with smoke houses. (aw-shucks ... blush)


Eric, your cola recipe sounds good.  Is that with classic?  A  S.Claus north pole recipe?  Lets see... If I could get some cola nuts, I could avoid the sugar.  


Anyone thinking of wrapping a ham in a baked bread crust?

ehanner's picture
ehanner

If you are able to find an uncooked Ham, the source will be able to tell you how to cook it. One of the best I have made involved first soaking it in water for 24 hours to remove some of the salt. They are pretty salty after curing. Then I simmered it in Coca Cola with cloves stuck in the skin. This isn't a recipe but I wanted to intervene and say, never eat an uncooked cured ham.


Eric

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Example- Country Ham - Uncooked and they are cured,  ... wikipedia states 'most' hams are cooked..  Some hams are partially cooked.   Remove the outerlayer fat/mold and cook until the center reads 160 for uncooked and 130 for cooked...use a thermometer.. 

bnom's picture
bnom

I was thinking about doing a fresh (uncured, raw) ham this year as well. Cook's Illustrated did a great article about roasting fresh ham some years ago--I kept the article and if you're interested, I'll try to dig it up in the next few days.  


 

bnom's picture
bnom

As for where to buy fresh ham... I often see them at Asian and Mexican grocery stores (that have in-house butchers). But you should be able to order it from your regular butcher. 

madruby's picture
madruby

My ex mom in law has a great recipe and she often served her famous fresh ham at Easter.  She cooked the ham in water, at very low heat for a few hours.  That piece of meat tasted delicious.  I will try to get her recipe tonight and post it here for you.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I was a pilot for all of 35 years and had the blessing of being able to sample foods all over the world. Most of my travels were inside the US and I enjoyed the regional specialties as often as possible. I became fond of Southern Salt Cured Ham that is available widely in any diner in the South but never any where else. I'm pretty sure the word "cured" means that some part of the process includes heavy salting to prevent the meat from spoiling during the aging process. A friend sent me a slab of "Cured" ham from a grocery store in Alabama recently. Something you would never find here in snow country. It was clearly marked "Uncooked cured". You are instructed to simmer the thick slice in water and cook for 10 minutes, covered. The meat was tender and salty. The reserved cooking water, if reduced, is what they call red eye gravy. Some of our Southern members are probably rolling their eyes at my description of this process but you get the idea.


The point is, cured ham is a salty product. Much more so than a "Cooks Ham" that is sold widely all over the US and Canada I think. The Cooks products are smoked and slow cured and, ready to eat. Just warm and eat.


Unless you are familiar with salt cured ham, be sure to investigate the subject further before you buy one for a big family dinner.


I see you are from Quebec and so none of this may apply to your available choices .  Personally, I would stroll down the board walk to the Chateau Frontenac and order up from one of the best restaurants in the world.


Eric

qahtan's picture
qahtan

I come from England and to me ham is ham,, smoked or cured pork,,,,,,if it's not smoked it's pork.. here in Canada there is ham, then there is what they call fresh ham which is pork,,,, it being the hind leg of pork.....


 the rest of the pig is sold either as fresh pork or some part are smoked like ribs etc and called smoked whatever.......


When my daughter was married I ordered a whole ham, which was a whole leg of pork smoked.. it was gorgeous.    


 I baked it , poking a few small hole in the skin, basting with cider, when cooked I removed the skin and painted it with mustard and sprinkled it with fine bread crumbs, it needed nothing else as the flavour of the ham was deliceous.


 qahtan

qahtan's picture
qahtan

virginia smoked hamvirginia smoked hamvirginia smoked ham

madruby's picture
madruby

A fresh ham is a ham that has not been cooked in any way. It has not been cured by drying or adding salt as a preservative, nor has it been cooked by smoking. Fresh hams can be prepared by smoking, baking (either in the oven or on an outdoor grill), or curing with salt.  Fresh ham should have a white cap of fat on the top. The muscle should be a pink color, and have some marbling throughout. 


EXCERPT FROM MAHALO


This is exactly what I have been looking for...Since the ham is not cured, I guess it is just basically a piece of pork!  I called my grocery store this morning and they explained  that all the ham I see already packed is also cooked ham.  If I want an uncooked one, I just need to head to the butcher's counter and request for one.  They call it pork but also fresh ham.  Now, all I need is a darn good recipe to go with it.  Thanks all....

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi madruby,


Here is a link to preparing fresh pork ham at home


http://schmidling.com/ham.htm


Promises a tasty cure. Seems it's very important to use the Prague No 1 Powder to prevent botulism and also to heat to and hold the meat at155F to kill trichinosis, if present. Says Prague powder can be bought online at American Spice and elsewhere. Author seems to say it has to be 1 not 2. The cure introduces spices but it is not glazed. Once it's safely cured, though, I imagine other flavours could be added? Can't vouch for this myself as have not tried it so up to you to see if it's worth the risk or not, but seems to be quite authoritative, for example on advising the powder and not just salted water.


Kind regards, Daisy_A

Ruralidle's picture
Ruralidle

madruby


To me (a UK resident and amateur ham and bacon producer - family consumption only) pork is raw meat from a pig and ham (and bacon) has been treated, or cured, by the addition of salt and (usually) a curing agent such as Prague Powder #1, Prague Powder #2 or saltpetre.  One or other of the latter two are generally used for hams that are to be stored for a long time (eg air dryed hams such a Parma ham).  The salt (and curing agent) are applied to the raw pork for a specified length of time and sugars, herbs etc can be introduced into the salt mix from the very start.  These ingredients can either be applied dry (dry curing) or in water (brine or wet curing).  Once  the specified time (depends upon thickness of the meat, the curing agent and curing method used) has elapsed the pork has been magically transformed into ham. 


To cook ham I first soak it in cold water for 24 to 48 hours to remove excess salt and then place it onto a trivet in a roasting tray.  I pour 500ml to 1litre of cider into the tray (not so much that the ham is sitting in it) and make a foil "tent" over the ham.  Bring the cider to the boil and simmer for 30 minutes before placing the whole thing into an oven that is heated to just below boiling point.  A 4kg ham then needs 4 to 5 hours in the oven, longer - up to 8 or 10 hours - for a larger ham (people who are higher tech than me will tell you what internal temperature to achieve but I use a traditional Aga cooker and fly it "by the seat of my pants").


When the cooking is finished, remove the ham from the oven and remove the foil tent.  Allow the ham to cool sightly and then carefully remove the skin whilst the ham is still quite hot (it is far easier to do than when it is cold).  Make sure to leave a covering of fat on the ham (how much depends upon your preference).  You can then score the ham in a traditional diamond pattern, or whatever pattern you like.  Stud with cloves and coat with your glaze of choice.  Roast, uncovered, for 30 to 45 minutes at 200C until the glaze has the colour you like.  Carve/slice and enjoy.


If you want more information about curing pork, making sausages etc, look at http://forum.sausagemaking.org/


HTH


Ruralidle