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Some of November's Baking

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ananda's picture
ananda

Some of November's Baking

 


My Foundation Degree students were making their own breads using pre-ferments a couple of weeks ago.   Both a "Biga" and a "Poolish" were available for their use.   They made some very fine pizzas, and an assortment of flavoured breads.


Once they had weighed all their pre-ferments, I noticed there were some "leftovers".


So, I made the following as demonstrations.   The baguettes, shown below, were actually to help a late arriving student on his way, to enable product completion in the practical time.   The tinned loaves were an experiment to demonstrate how, even at a very high proportion in the final dough, a biga can contribute fantastic improving qualities, resulting in super high crown bread.


It was also a joy to be able to use local organic flour in the final doughs as well.


•1.    Baguettes with a Poolish


Material

Formula [% of flour]

1. Poolish

 

Special CC Flour

35

Water

35

Fresh Yeast

0.4

TOTAL

70.4

2. Final Dough

 

Poolish [from above]

70.4

Gilchesters Pizza/Ciabatta Flour

65

Salt

1.8

Fresh Yeast

1.8

Water

33

TOTAL

172

Method:

  • Mix on first speed in an upright machine for 10 minutes with the hook attachment. DDT 26°C
  • Ferment in bulk for 1 hour, covered at 26°C
  • Scale and divide for baguettes at 340g; pre-shape and rest 20 minutes, covered
  • Shape and prove, en coûche, 50 minutes. Use coarse semolina as needed.
  • Use a loader and baguette peel to set the baguettes, and use a grignette to slash the surface beforehand.
  • Bake in a deck oven, with steam at 240°C, top heat 7, bottom heat 5 for 15 minutes. Open the damper and bake out a further 5 minutes.
  • Cool on wires
  • baguettebaguette_crumbPicture1

•2.    High Crown Tinned Breads with a large proportion of Biga in the final dough

Material

Formula [% of flour]

1. Biga

 

Special CC Flour

67

Water

40

Fresh Yeast

0.4

TOTAL

107.4

2. Final Dough

 

Biga [from above]

107.4

Gilchesters Organic Farmhouse Flour

33

Salt

1.8

Shortening

1.8

Fresh Yeast

1.8

Water

25.2

TOTAL

171

Method:

  • Mix the dough on slow speed only in a spiral mixer for 15 minutes. DDT 27°C
  • Ferment covered, in bulk for 50 minutes at 27°C
  • Scale and divide at 960g for large tins. Pre-shape by moulding round. Rest covered for 10 minutes.
  • Shape and place in prepared tins.
  • Prove at 35°C, 85% rH for 1 hour.
  • Bake in a deck oven with steam at 235°C, top heat6, bottom heat8, for 15 minutes. Drop the temperature to 220°C for 10 minutes. Open the damper and bake out a further 5 -8 minutes.
  • Cool on wires
  • Sponge_TinCut-face2Cut_face1

 

 

•3.    A Rye Reversal

I was meant to be accompanying Faye to the Warburton's Young Baker of the Year; the National Final in Bolton, tomorrow.   Faye was scheduled to make her Nettle Bread in College this afternoon.   Let's say the weather has played havoc with our plans.   The bread uses a portion of white leaven in the final dough.   Building this leaven was problem number one.   Faye used up what flour she had at home, and I did the same here in Ananda.   But Alison and I have been snowbound for a few days now.   It took me 3 hours to dig the car out this morning.   A helpful neighbour made sure I could move by employing a digger to clear the route out of the Square.   I had 350g Leaven, and hoped Faye had the rest of what she needed.

But it was all to no avail.   I took a phone call just 10 miles down the road.   The Competition had been postponed.   The road conditions were poor and most of the morning had already passed.   I turned back and went home.   Once safely nestled back in our warm abode, I wondered what to do with the leaven I had.   "Good to go", but only Dark Rye flour in stock!   This is what I came up with.   I've used this title as I love the Pain Siègle formula with a Rye Sour used to raise a primarily wheat bread.   This is a wheat leaven used to raise a mainly rye loaf.   Here is the formula and recipe:

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Leaven

 

 

Special CC Flour

25

220

Water

15

130

TOTAL

40

350

2. Final Paste

 

 

Leaven [from above]

40

350

Bacheldre Dark Rye Flour

75

670

Salt

1.5

13

Blackstrap Molasses

5

45

Water

70

626

TOTAL

191.5

1704

Method:

  • Break up the leaven in water with temperature 35°C.
  • Add and dissolve both the molasses and salt. Then fold in the flour to form a smooth paste; DDT 28°C.
  • Drop the paste into a Pullman Pan lined with silicone paper.
  • Prove for 4 hours at 32°C, lid fitted loosely.
  • Bake from cold in an oven with a water bowl for steam. Heat to 175°C and bake for 1½ hours. Take the lid off the pan, drop the heat to 160°C and bake a further half hour. Probe the core to record a temperature of at least 96°C.
  • Cool on wires
  • DSCF1513DSCF1510DSCF1511DSCF1512DSCF1514DSCF1515DSCF1516DSCF1517DSCF1518

  

Happy Baking!

 

Andy

Comments

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Andy!


I love the routes you took to those breads as much as the outcomes. Beautiful loaves.


About the only breads I make as pan loaves are a 100% whole wheat and a cinnamon-raisin-walnut bread. Your examples have me wanting to try other ones.


I just got a pullman pan and have yet to use it. I'm thinking about making Hamelman's HB pumpernickel or an egg bread/pain de mie. A new (for me) adventure. Do you have any general advice for baking in pullman pans?


David

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Oh, my... you guys better stop temting me, I don't want to buy a Pullman pan...


 


or.... do I want one?   how bad?

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Sally,


Thank you for commenting.   You only want to buy a Pullman Pan if you want to make a particular style of bread


I know you make lots of different types, but didn't I read a comment of yours recently in another post, that you already have a treasured type of bread pan?


I use the Pullman as much, if not more, for high rye.   I prefer the open topped high crown bread to a "Sandwich Loaf".


They are very high quality, however, so I do enjoy baking with the Pullman Pan


BW


Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi David,


Thank you very much for your kind words.


I guess the 2 breads above and baked in tins are a total contrast.   The high crown loaf I relate very much to an English style of  bread, although it would be exceptionally rare to find one on the High Street made with such high levels of pre-ferment.   I do, however, know of a few craft bakers employing very long fermentation with their tinned loaves; just that they use straight dough instead of 2-stage.


Then the ridiculously sticky and heavy rye in stark contrast.   As noted, I line the pan with silicone for this.   I don't like to oil my lovely Pullman Pan anything other than as lightly as possible.   But I think the rye paste could easily have a detrimental effect on the metal of the tin.


I guess my best advice is to think carefully before deciding how much paste/dough to put in the tin beforehand.   Then relate that decision exactly to determining your bake profile.   If you look at these details in the post above, you'll probably get a really good idea of what I'm talking about.   The other pointer is that the heat source ideally should come more from the bottom, as you are adding lots of metal to your oven, as well as the dough contained within.   Your bake time needs to take account of this.


Hope this helps; thanks again


Andy

plevee's picture
plevee

Scrumptious looking breads Andy. I wish I could join your classes.


Could you give me a source for the deep English loaf pans? I searched every kichen equipment shop in London the last time I was home and have looked all over the internet without being able to find these.  Patsy

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Patsy,


You could try these people:


Creeds Southern: http://www.creeds.uk.com/cook.html


Invicta Bakeware: http://www.invictabakeware.co.uk/bread-tins-3.html


Both these are trade organisations.   I haven't seen any bread pans in the High Street which I like.   I have the Pullman Pan and one other which you can see in the photo here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/17539/slight-variations-two-more-formulae-hamelman039s-quotbreadquot    The quality of this pan is excellent, but I don't like the shape.   Usually they are too wide and shallow of depth.


As you are probably aware, I made the High Crown loaves in College.   Many thanks for your kind words, and, good luck in your search


BW


Andy

plevee's picture
plevee

Thanks for the info - they don't look too hopeful for a pair of pans but I'll try when I'm home next.


I lived in a village near Doncaster when I was young. The baker was a man called Ruddock with his 2 sons. They made 2 sizes of loaves but both were this shape. The only things they made were white & Hovis bread, teacakes, barm loaves, custard tarts, a feather-light Victoria sandwich and hot cross buns in Lent. The shop was packed, with queues round the block every day & it was some of the best baking I ever tasted.


I used to have a couple of these pans - bought on Donny market - but they perished in a fire 12 years ago & I've been trying to replace them since.


Ruddocks has been gone many years, replaced by an Asda! Your bread takes me back.  Patsy

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Patsy.


Had a look on ebay; some interesting items there, including some old pan with logos stamped on the sides: Allinson, Hovis and Cremalt


There are 5 pages here: http://shop.ebay.co.uk/i.html?_trkparms=65%253A12%257C66%253A2%257C39%253A1%257C72%253A3133&rt=nc&_nkw=bread%20tin&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14.l1581&_pgn=1


and 2 pages here: http://shop.ebay.co.uk/i.html?_nkw=bread+pans&_sacat=0&_odkw=bread+tin&_osacat=0&_trksid=p3286.c0.m270.l1313


Happy bidding, if you see anything you like


Andy

plevee's picture
plevee

It never occurred to me to look on ebay.co.uk!


Thanks, Patsy

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Andy,


So great to see such beautiful examples of such different breads.


You know I admire all your breads but it is so good in the context of debates about bread volume to see such a lovely white made in artisan style and without potentially unhealthy 'enhancers'. 


So sorry to hear that you and Faye have been battling against the weather! Glad, however, that you might be able to prepare for the competition under more normal conditions. 


Very best wishes, Daisy_A

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Daisy_A,


Thank you very much, as ever for your continued support and compliments.


Believe it or not, the high crown loaf is nowhere near a white bread.   The biga was made with the Carrs Special CC which is my strong flour of choice in College.   This is not what would be called a "High Gluten", or "Super Strong" flour, but the protein quality [level is just over 12%] is exceptional; an All Canadian wheatflour.   Carrs themselves describe it, justifiably I would argue, as "world-class flour".   The Gilchester Farmhouse flour is not in the same league, in terms of protein quality; it doesn't need [sorry!] to be even in this circumstance.   It is, however, quite exceptionally milled, and has an extraction rate Andrew Wilkinson said to be around 85%.   So, I would reckon the ash content to be on the 1% mark.   The photos are confusing, as they were taken with different settings; but one is indicative of an element of brown flour in the final loaf.


The "Biga" is just the best enhancer anyone could ever wish for!


All good wishes


Andy

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Andy,


Sorry thought it was the best white. Even better then to get such openness and lift with some precious bran in as well :-) Absolutely counters the theory that one needs additional chemicals or very high extraction flour to do this - go Biga!


Best wishes, Daisy_A

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Andy,


Just read in the paper last night about how badly you folks in the NE got walloped with snow, and wondered if it might derail the contest. So sorry! What can you do ay?


All the breads look wonderful, but the rye is the one I'd love to sink my teeth into. The crumb is flawless, as usual, at least with any of your breads that I've  seen. I know the big open type crumb is pretty fashionable these days, but honestly I think a consistently even but still open crumb like yours takes a greater degree of skill and care from the baker. Beautiful bread Andy!


Re: the Bacheldre Dark Rye..is it a fairly course grind? From the photos it looks like there are pieces of the whole grain in the crumb or am I seeing something else. Just curious.


Best Wishes,


Franko


 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Franko,


Yes the "walloping" continues.   I made it to work for 09:30 this morning, but turned tail about 13:30 as it had snowed in flurries for much of the morning.   Got the shopping done, so we're safe and sound and warm back home now.   More to come early tomorrow, apparently!


I tried the rye bread this morning, curious to discover the way the formula changes had affected the flavour.   Less sour for sure, but the depth to the heavy rye element is monumental.   Yes the crumb is the way it is on account of that coarse grind you have rightly identified.   Quite sublime!   The Bacheldre people are a really interesting Company.   We are talking about a renovated watermill in rural Wales, dating back to the 16th Century, now milling traditional organic grains.   But the owners have been in discussions with seriously big companies like Warburtons, extolling the virtues of using these traditional varieties within the overall grist of a company's chosen loaves and bread products.   A truly ambitious way to market themselves.   My fellow British colleague, Daisy_A [above], has also discovered the joys of Bacheldre rye.   It is available in the Waitrose supermarket stores here in the UK.


I only tend to go for really big holes in the crumb when I'm making Ciabatta, and related types of bread.   I agree pretty much completely with everything you have written, very briefly above.   The crumb of the high crown loaf is really meant to show the evenness that can be achieved simply through long fermentation.   That was a key point in the exercise, to demonstrate this to the students concerned.   I guess correct judgement of fermentation, and experienced handling and moulding skills are critical here.   Alas, the photos of the baguette crumb are not that great, and don't really do full justice to them.


It's so good to hear from you, as always Franko,


Best wishes


Andy 

wally's picture
wally

I love what you do with 'leftovers' and what you have at hand to bake with.  Very creative and very tasty looking.  I've never tried a dough where the biga is half the total weight, but those loaves look so good and I can only imagine at the flavor you got.


Glad to see that snowboundness hasn't slowed you down!


Larry

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Larry,


Many thanks for your comments and compliments; it's always good to hear from you.


I am sure I have read in more than one of your comments on TFL threads some very wise counsel concerning not using over-ripe pre-ferments.   This was crucial in this instance.   The Biga was quite mature at around 16 hours old, but it was still in very good condition.   That was the absolute key to success here; something you obviously already know well.


The flavour was what I would imagine of a typically "old-style" variation of this type of British Tin Bread.   Sadly, I think it might be too much for many modern day palates...but I would be oh so happy to be proved wrong on this count!


All good wishes


Andy

yozzause's picture
yozzause

Hi Andy


Great post and pictures sorry to hear about the bad weather, we have just had the hottest spring for thirty years and the first heatwave for November in 10 years.


At least being snowbound and baking would have kept you snug.


The hightops or uprights as we call them here looked superb these were a loaf that were one of the main loaves that were produced as a pair for the bread judging at the Royal show. Very few are seen for sale these days and quite often people would buy just half the loaf which needed to split nice and evenly.


Anyway the English cricket team seems to be enjoying the escape from the old country and some success on the pitch too. I hope Faye gets to strut her stuff soon so good luck to you both.


Regards Yozza  

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Yozza,


Yep, I don't think I could get my head round sunbathing at Christmas!


Quite so, concerning the high crown loaves; they are typical of the sort of methods used in Competition Breads over here too.   However, the sponge element would be more like a half of the total flour.   I was just going to extremes for the purposes of a student demonstration of "the possible".


Have you ever come across this type of bread moulded into 2 pieces side by side in the pan?   Then they can be separated easily after baking.   Correctly moulded, and this can look really lovely.


The English team were much touted in the quality English newspapers as they left for Australia.   I only ever really follow the Test matches, and it is so good to see them playing well.   Frankly, the best games always take place when the sides are evenly matched.   Aside the last whitewash in Australia, all the recent Ashes contests have been absolute classics.   I do really miss the bowling of Simon Jones; tragic that one so talented could not have played more.   It will be a great series, this one, I am sure..and very very close.


Good to hear from you


All the best


Andy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

They look so tasty! I haven't read your this breadbaking method carefully. I will keep this thread in my favorite's list. So I can reread and someday I want to try, especially your baguette! I have learned your proffesional skill and I am here to say "Thank you" Sincerely, Akiko

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Akiko,


Thank you for commenting and being so genorous too.


The main goal must always be to make tasty bread, yes?   Flavour is the constant reminder from the likes of Peter Reinhart, afterall.


The baguette is a fairly standard method in many ways.   Combining strong flour in the Poolish with local organic flour is probably what made this particular batch memorable.   The other 2 breads go much more "out on a limb", and, in very different ways too.


Best wishes


Andy