The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Kindle Books

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KMIAA's picture
KMIAA

Kindle Books

Does anyone own a Kindle, and if so, do you like it.  Am considering the Kindle and some baking books.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I own a Kindle.  I like it for reading what I'd otherwise read in a paperback, but I don't like it to replace cookbooks or magazines or anything with charts or photos or diagrams.  


In the kitchen, I use the iPad. 


Rumor has it that Kindle 2s are going to be on sale for $89 tomorrow.  At that price it is definitely a good deal.

cordel's picture
cordel

How do you like the iPad, and what do you use it for other than the kitchen?  I want to buy either a Kindle or iPad, and for somethings I would like the back lighting.

KMIAA's picture
KMIAA

Hi, thanks for your comments.  I looked at the iPad a few weeks ago.  Was interested in that also.  What features do you use the most with the iPad.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

For reading books, I really don't like the iPad.  The bright backlit screen gives me more eyestrain than the eInk screen on the Kindle.  And the form factor isn't as good, either: it is too heavy to hold with one hand while laying down, and you have to turn pages on the touch screen, whereas the Kindle has perfectly positioned buttons where your thumbs sit and it is very light.  So if what you want to do is just tear through books, the Kindle is the way to go.  It also is a lot cheaper and has much better battery life too, and the lack of multimedia functionality is actually a good thing for serious reading since it means there are a lot fewer distractions.  


As I said, the iPad is great in the kitchen.  I bake w/ it + TFL all the time now.  It is very good for web browsing as long as the sites you hit don't require Flash.  Mostly, I use it for reading newspapers.  The New York Times and the Globe and Mail apps I use daily.  There are also a ton of cute games for it, like Angry Birds.  It is a very good casual internet and information device -- looking up movie times, directions, information on Wikipedia -- but not nearly as good a long-form reading device as the Kindle.


Even having both, I have to admit I still buy most of my books in dead tree format.  I work 6 blocks from Powells Books though, so I'm pretty spoiled. If I had to travel a lot and spent a lot of time on airplanes, hotels, and airports, there is no question I'd swear by the Kindle.

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

I have Kindle for PC, a free download from Amazon, on my laptop. Its readability is amazing.


cheers,


gary

KMIAA's picture
KMIAA

Thanks for the info.  Am waiting more input on the iPad.  Am so undecided. 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

That is definitely an advantage of the Kindle.  There are Kindle apps for the Mac, iPhone, and Android too, so if you spend a lot of time in front of screens you can buy it once and have it available everywhere.

Jessica Weissman's picture
Jessica Weissman

We have both.  The ipad does far more than a Kindle does, of course, and costs more too.  


The Kindle is absolutely stone fabulous for reading.  It's very light.  The battery lasts for weeks, which means you can take it on a trip and leave the cord ad home and always have something to read except during plane takeoff and landing.  You can get virtually any classic book for it free (or in fancier paid editions).  A huge number of current books are available for it at a variety of prices.  They're no longer all 9.99, but many are and many are less.  And, as I mentioned, there are kajillions of free classic works.  iPad books tend to cost a bit more.


Once you've bought a Kindle book, you can read it on virtually any other electronic device you own, except proprietary ebook readers from other manufacturers.


Both Kindle and ipad/iBooks make the process of finding and downloading books pretty simple.  


There are many reading apps for the iPad, so you have access to lots and lots of content.  But battery life is a concern, as is weight.  As is theft potential.  You need a booklight if you want to read in the dark as there is no backlighting.


So, you pays yer money and you takes yer choice.


 

KMIAA's picture
KMIAA

Thanks for all the input.  I think I'll go with the Kindle right now. 

jackie9999's picture
jackie9999

I got my Kindle3 about a month ago and couldn't be more pleased. I've loaded it up with a couple of hundred books...many of which I normally wouldn't have read. I also got some of my favorite authors just to reread (i.e. the John Sandford Prey series) The format is great for laying in bed reading or propped up in a chair with a blanket. I got myself a nice cover from oberondesign to protect it. I don't need a light since I always have a lamp ...if you think you'll need the backlight (camping?) then you can get some nice ones incorporated into the cover. I originally researched the ebooks because I'd read about 'bed bugs' in library books!!!!


If you're an avid reader ..you'll love it :)

BettyR's picture
BettyR

getting a Kindle but I have several concerns.


1.) How long can you store your books on your Kindle? Is there a way to store them on a permanent basis? I like to keep my books because I enjoy re-reading some of my favorites from time to time. With the amount of books I go through in a year storage space has become a problem.


2.) I live in a very rural area, we recently got a cell phone tower but that is as far as we have traveled into the 21 century. Does the Kindle work on cell phone connections or is it some other technology?


3.) How durable are they? Can they take mild abuse...say a fall from a chair arm to a tile floor? I rarely drop my books when I'm reading but it does happen.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Hi Betty,


1 - As long as you'd like.  The capacity is pretty huge, so you can fit hundreds if not thousands of books on there. 


2 - My Kindle 2 has cellular as well as can be tethered to a computer, so I often download free books from sites like Feedbooks and then just copy them onto the Kindle as if it is an external hard drive.


3 - Get a cover.  I have the standard leather cover, which is pretty well padded.  I've dropped it a few times and there has been no  visible damage.

KMIAA's picture
KMIAA

What I am worried about is the fact that since it is electronic what happens if something goes bad?  You say it's like an external hard drive.  As you know hard drives can go bad.  Is it possible to lose the books you purchased due to a failure of the kindle?  If so, what options do you have since your purchased your books. 


Also, am wondering if there is a way for a backup?  I frequently do backups on all my graphics since I've had hard drive failures in the past.  Do you think you could lose your books if something happens? 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

If you buy your ebooks through Amazon I'm pretty sure they stayed associated with you account and you could download them again.  If they are books you got elsewhere and transferred manually, you'll have to do that again. 

BettyR's picture
BettyR

that helps a lot.


 


The Kindle would be a sensible solution to my problem of storage space and it would eliminate my week-plus wait for the books I order. I usually purchase used books from sellers through Amazon, but after I pay the $3.99 shipping plus the cost of the book I could have the kindle version right away for about the same price.


 


Is there some sort of monthly service fee associated with the use of the Kindle?

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Nope, no monthly fee.  

BettyR's picture
BettyR

Thanks!!!

jackie9999's picture
jackie9999

My Kindle3 will hold about 3,500 books. I don't know too much about buying the books off of Amazon, but I'm pretty sure they maintain your library..i.e. if you need to reload it - it's on your a/c there. The Kindle3 has two versions,  wifi (my version) or 3G. With wifi you can 'buy' your books directly from Amazon. Perhaps someone that buys books would correct me there...


Wifi comes in handy if you have access to a wireless connection - to read newspaper, newsfeeds etc.


I keep my own library on my computer (and have a backup on usb stick) with a program called calibre. I load books into calibre and send them over to Kindle (via usb cable). Once read I delete them from Kindle ..they're still on my hard drive if I want to reload them or delete from there..make sense?


I don't have a light and find my battery lasts about a month.


HTH's

KMIAA's picture
KMIAA

Thanks for the info.  I'll look into calibre.  I have external hard drvies for my laptop and desktop, so I'lm all set there.

highmtnpam's picture
highmtnpam

You can download library books on Kindle.  You need a library card, but they are free.  You can check them out for 2/3 weeks, depending on the library.  It is especially good for rural areas.  


Pam

Jo_Jo_'s picture
Jo_Jo_

My understanding is that Kindle doesn't support library books.  Did I misunderstand when I was reading the reviews etc?

highmtnpam's picture
highmtnpam

It is the Nook or Sony Reader that can use the library.. As Jo Jo said, the Kindle doesn't support library books.  Must have still have been in dishes Hell and my brain must have exploded.


Pam

sheffield's picture
sheffield (not verified)

Here's a link to a news release about kindle being able to borrow library books.

http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=176060&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1552678&highlight=

M2's picture
M2

I'm also interested in getting a kindle, but I worry that Amazon can take away books that I have purchased, as if they can exercise censorship on things and I can't even keep the ebook that I have paid for.  What do you think?


I just learned that Sony is going to introduce a new smartphone with some nice ebook reader features.  That would be an option as I prefer not to carry too many gadgets around.


Michelle

Floydm's picture
Floydm

As far as I known, Amazon has only been known to do that once.  Ironically it was an edition of 1984 that they removed.  I suspect the risks of Amazon wiping your device are very low but they aren't zero.


Fewer gadgets is a good thing, but reading long texts on a smart phone is still difficult.  I use the Kindle app on my Droid from time-to-time and it is better than nothing, but it certainly not as easy on the eyes as a larger display.  The backlight also bugs me, so I end up switching to white text on a black background.


RIM, the Blackberry company, is coming out with a 7 inch tablet soon, which is a size between a phone and an iPad, more like a Kindle in size.  I'll be interested in seeing how it does.

kolobezka's picture
kolobezka

Hi,

I am considering buying a Kindle or another e-book reader. I was thinking it would save me a lot of money for international shipping from Amazon or other shops.

But I wonder how do books about baking look like on the small screen in ebook format. Is it well organised? Are there pictures? Of course it may not be comfortable to write notes there (as Karin mentioned elsewhere), but is it suitable at least for reading and viewing recipes?

Would you have any recommandation for me regarding the type of e-reader or other?

Thanks!

zdenka

jcking's picture
jcking

I enjoy my Kindle for reading books; not so much for cook/recipe books. The two baking books I have purchased had no table of content links or any way to find a recipe other than search. It's not the Kindles' fault. If you like the pictures buy the hard books, pictures don't normally come with Kindle books.

If you purchase your books from Amazon they are yours for life and can be shared with other Kindles under your account (wife, daughter and myself share all our books). They will archive your books, and any notes you make, so you are not limited by the storage capability of your particular model.

If you like there are ways to transfer recipe files from your computer to the Kindle.

Jim

kolobezka's picture
kolobezka

Please, Jim, what cookbooks in kindle format do you have?

Would it be possible to take some screenshots examples on photo?

Thanks!

zdenka

jcking's picture
jcking

Z,

I have Splendid Soups: Recipes and master techniques for making the world's best soups, James Peterson ~ and, The Ultimate Bread Machine Cookbook by WHO knows.

The above pic is page one. Neither one has a TOC so your on you own finding what recipies each contains. I suggest, as I should have done, is do a trail (they'll sometimes allow you to preview a chapter of a book before you buy) first.

Jim

kolobezka's picture
kolobezka

Great! Thank you very much for the picture. It gives me a better idea. Any pictures in the book?

I have heard I should be create a TOC id the book doesn´t have one. Any idea abou that?

zdenka

jcking's picture
jcking

There are no pictures in either of the books I have. You can create bookmarks if you like, a type of TOC, yet it would be time consuming. I imagine as other cook/bake books come along they will provide TOC's. Other than simple line drawings Kindle books are not very good at pictures as they would be black and white only.

Jim

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

Call  me old fashioned but when it comes to reference books, I still prefer to have a book in my hands.  I have the Kindle application on my iPad,  and I only use it for magazines and novels.  I also purchased two "Delicious" magaines originally published in Australia  that I'm unable to find here in HK from Amazon and unfortunately they don't come with pictures.   I wouldn't want to use the iPad inthe kitchen in case I spill or drop something on it or touch the screen with my greasy/dirty hands.

mpez0's picture
mpez0

There are waterproof cases that will fit various eReaders and tablets.  They're generally designed for pool or boating use, but work fine for bathtub reading or kitchen table protection.  Just use a search engine to find your size, price, and protection point.

naschol's picture
naschol

The main reason I didn't want the Kindle was that it won't allow you to load items directly onto your ebook from your computer.  You have to send the items in and receive them back, converted, from Amazon.  This means checked out books from the library, .pdf or word documents, etc.  It just seemed like too much of a hassle IMHO.  The Sony will allow for more options.

 

Nancy

pjaj's picture
pjaj

I too have a Kindle and it is fairly easy to create your own Kindle readable documents. It can display pdf and there is readily available freeware that will convert other formats to Kindle readable ones.

Therefore, some of the recipes and manuals on this site could be made available for Kindle. Just a thought.

jannrn's picture
jannrn

I have a Nook and LOVE it!!  I have an iPad too...but I love my Nook for reading....and the iPad for travelling....With the Nook, your library is ALWAYS retained on the Barnes and Noble website. I have the applications for the Nook downloaded onto my phone AND iPad as well as my Laptop....the phone is a bit small to read on, the iPad too heavy but with my laptop, I can stop and check other things as I need to. With my  Nook, I also get my subscription to National Geographic and the pictures are as clear and perfect as in the magazine! I am a Travel Nurse and travel in my Camper....so I have NO room for alot of books. I can save TENS of thousands of books on my Nook!! Take a look at them before you make your decision!!

Good Luck!

Frazestart's picture
Frazestart

I have a Nook Color and use it to read (mostly library) books, check email while I'm traveling, do some minor web surfing, listen to Eudora radio or watch Netflix videos. All those activities, other than reading books on the device, require access to wifi.  Nook is fine for cookbooks: some of the newer Nook cookbooks incorporate extra features such as videos and the reader has a decent search function so finding recipes shouldn't be an issue. What I do find is that the selection of cookbooks  does not compare to that for printed books, and mass-market titles, the type that usually end on the remainder shelves of bookstores("101 potato recipes"), far outnumber the more serious/specialized books. Since publishers decide what titles are made into eBooks, I'm guessing it's probably no more than slightly better for Kindle.

My pet peeves with eBooks are price fixing (prices are now set by publishers, are edging higher and higher and, show little change with time, i.e., unlike hardbacks, they don't go down to $1.99 when the paperback comes out) and the very restrictive digital rights (you can't lend (except for a limited few and only for a 14-day period per lifetime), sell or donate books once you've read them.

 

PlicketyCat's picture
PlicketyCat

I actually find the pricing on many eBooks offensive. Having worked in the publishing industry, I know that a large majority (about 1/2 to 2/3) of the price of a book is the cost of printing, binding and distributing the physical books. Another smaller chunk goes to advertising, another small chunk is for their staffing/operations, and a tiny sliver goes to the author for their intellectual property (unless they are a big name author and have negotiated a higher cut). The rest is pure profit for the publisher. Publishers make more money on hardbacks because the price is still much higher than the costs; the costs for hardback are only marginally more than paperback in many cases. But the physical costs are not a factor in eBooks, advertising & staffing/operations is already covered by physical production, and the author still only gets the same tiny sliver... but charging the same price as a paperback (or more!) for an eBook means that the publisher gets even more profit.

It's the same issue we saw with digital music when Napster came out. Unfortunately, the publishers won that one... we don't think a thing about spending a $1 to download a single song even though you can buy the whole disc with 9-11 songs for $7 once it's off the new release list. And the musicians still only get a tiny sliver for their intellectual property. Luckily, many musicians have begun pre-empting the publishers by retaining their digital rights and offering their music to the public for download at a reasonable price and the profit goes to them directly.

Hopefully, we'll start seeing more authors doing the same. Currently, most of the "author published" eBooks online are not up to the quality bar yet... poorly edited, poorly formatted, or light on valuable content. I continue to cross my fingers and wait.

wmtimm627's picture
wmtimm627

I'm a tech geek all the way, but when it comes to cookbooks, I'll take paper over electronic every time.

Don't get me wrong; I use web-based searches for recipes all the time, but owning certain books and having them on hand all the time with torn pages and stains on the recipes that I use all the time is just, I don't know, why things are right.

PlicketyCat's picture
PlicketyCat

I have a Kindle Keyboard for reading books. It is wonderful. Has a long battery life and oodles of storage. I have several entire series and full author collections and am nowhere near running out of room. You can even get the entire OED on a Kindle (not much else though), but anyone who's purchased the OED on disk knows that's one HUGE dictionary!! If anything bad ever happens to my Kindle, I can reload all the books I've bought from Amazon onto my replacement, and can still read my entire Kindle library using the PC program while I'm waiting for it. I've only had Amazon pull one book in 3 years and that was because the publisher submitted the wrong version... so basically they just swapped the "beta" version with the "published" version behind the scenes. That would only really be a problem if you had any notes or highlights attached to the book. But, like I said, once in 3 years with over 1000 books.

With that said, the standard Kindles don't really work well for books with lots of pictures/diagrams/charts. I have a few cook books (mostly food storage types) and a few gardening books that are PAINFUL to read on the Kindle because they were poorly formatted. I think that it's the publisher's formatting when they convert the file that is the problem for most cook books though. Really, the only thing that is tough on a Kindle (or any small screen really) is large graphics and charts. Standard Kindles also are not entirely Web-friendly. Yes, you can access the web, and Amazon's Kindle site is fairly easy to use, but normal Web browsing is not a pleasant experience. However, if all you really want is good reading of text, it's awesome. I got the cover with the integrated booklight, which handles reading the eInk in lowlight. The booklight drains the battery a little faster than just reading, but not horribly... I think I can still read two 300 pg novels with the light on before having to recharge.

I do still get samples of many cookbooks and gardening books on the Kindle. Many of them have a "Sample" option where you can get a chapter for free to see if the formatting and content are acceptable. This is a good feature for me to determine whether or not I want to  purchase the paper version of these books. Because, really, how many times have you ordered these types of reference books that look totally awesome only to receive it and realize it falls horribly short of expectations?

I personally don't like the iPad and don't find it to be superior in all circumstances. If I decide to get a full-color, web-friendly reading device, I'd likely get a Kindle Fire. It's lighter, smaller, has better screen resolution and is less expensive. It has most of the same features and access to many of the same/similar apps... plus I can access my current Kindle library from it immediately without having to do any weird conversions. I think it's the perfect middle-ground between a smart phone and a tablet/laptop. I've tinkered with one in the store and it seems fairly intuitive, although I can't say I tried to do anything extensive with it.

ETA: More than 11,000 libraries in the United States offer Public Library Books for Kindle, and the Kindle Owners' Lending Library allows eligible U. S. Amazon Prime members who own Kindle devices to choose from thousands of books to borrow for free as part of their paid Prime membership (if you have a Kindle Fire, the Prime membership also helps significantly with video and audio download costs and allowances). If the publisher allows it, you can also lend a Kindle book that you have purchased to a friend for 14 days and they can read it on their Kindle or using any of the free Kindle reader apps. You can also rent many textbooks from Kindle, which saves you a lot if you're a student or are doing research since textbooks tend to be large and expensive .

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I own the regular kindle, my husband has an iPad. My resume for what works best for what purpose:

If you read a lot of books, like to travel, and have already a library with overflowing bookshelves - which I do - the kindle is great. It's small, but not too small (try reading books on a smartphone!), and comfortable to work with. The battery lasts very long, you can buy classic literature often for free, and newer books often for less than the (new) print version.

The kindle is easy on the eye, and you can change the font size to your liking. All books you buy are forever stored on your amazon account archive - you can re-download them at any time, you don't have to keep them stored on your device. (If you hate them, you can remove them not only from your kindle, but, also from your amazon archive.) You can loan your books for 14 days to somebody else (for one time per book.) You can download and read samples, before you buy.

If your main computer is your iPad, and your carry it with you, anyway, you don't need an extra e-reader, kindle for iPad works very well, too. The battery, of course has to be charged much more often, which can be a concern when you are in transit. Working with an e-cookbook on an iPad is easier, you can see pictures better (and in color), but you will need an extra app (caffeine) to keep your screen from getting dark while you are cooking.

On the whole, I would not buy e-cookbooks, (see my post "Why E-Cookbooks Really Suck": http://hanseata.blogspot.com/2011/05/why-e-cookbooks-really-suck-but-some.html/node/23519) unless there are not available in print. Finding recipes is tedious, you have to go through the book page by page, and making notes is practical not doable because it's so cumbersome.

Karin

PlicketyCat's picture
PlicketyCat

I agree that using eCookbooks is a serious pain. This is entirely a formatting issue because the programs and devices do support searching, linkable TOCs and Indexes, internal links between content and zoomable graphics just like web pages... but the publishers can't be bothered to do it because they would really like the eBook market to just go away ($$$$). And it's partly the device manufacturer's fault for having proprietary software that isn't compatible with other devices -- publishers would be more likely to provide better eBooks if they only had to convert the content to one digital format instead of dozens. It's a shame, and extremely short-sighted, because there are so many people who love to cook but don't have the space to have all those printed cookbooks in their kitchen. So folks just end up searching the web for recipes and giving their money (through advertising or subscription) to websites.

bartwin's picture
bartwin

I bought the most fabulous app for the ipad for recipe management. It's called Paprika. $5 for the app for the iPad, though I also bought it for my Mac ($20).  CHeck this app out.  It's fantastic to browse the web for recipes to download and also have editing capacity.  I use it all the time.  Also has a grocery list and menu planning option and a timer.  

KMIAA's picture
KMIAA

What good is the IPad for except for mail, surfing the web, and maybe recipes?  I am contemplating getting one, but don't think I really need it.   I was thinking of it for email when I'm out of town, but that would be a lot of money for something I might not use a lot.  Any suggestions, good or bad?

hanseata's picture
hanseata

The iPad can replace a complete recording studio - my husband composes. You can take photos and videos with it, really amazing. The apps you can get for it are incredible.

For your everyday needs, and, especially if you have to write a lot, a laptop suffices (though you can connect your iPad to a keyboard and a wireless printer, if you want to).

I was wondering about the "Paprika" app, too, Bartwin.

Karin

PlicketyCat's picture
PlicketyCat

The iPad is, for all intents and purposes, a "dumb" mobile computer. The OS is fairly robust, but there aren't a lot of productivity applications built for it (yet), so it is primarily just for mail, messaging, surfing, gaming, iBooks and digital content subscriptions, video, audio and streaming media. And it does all those things wonderfully... but so does a fully functional laptop that costs and weighs only a little more.

Before you get convinced to invest in any gadget, you really need to determine what your needs are, how frequent are those needs, whether you already own a device that meets those needs, and any failings of that device that might make another device preferable for a specific activity (weight, display size, ease of use, etc).

If you want a device primarily to read text-based publications, then a dedicated reading device with eInk tech (rather than backlit LED) is probably your best bet... like the Nook or Kindle. But the content you want may not be available or properly formatted, so you should check that out before making decisions. This is a particularly viable option if you already have a laptop for computing/browsing and want something easier and lighter specifically for reading, and/or a smart phone for phone/mail and want something larger and more intuitive for reading.

If you primarly want to surf the web, message, email, play games or watch movies, AND you do these things often, then a mobile/tablet computer with a larger, color display and more robust OS is probably your best bet... like the iPad, Kindle Fire, TouchPad or Galaxy. These do have limited support for productivity programs/apps, so you may want to check out what apps you may be interested in are available and supported by each device before making decisions. Usually the key factors will be the size of the display and the weight of the unit... everyone has different preferences, but the basic functionality is similar. If you already have a wireless laptop, there is little advantage to getting a tablet unless size and weight is a major roadblock for portability and use.

If you primarily need to surf the web for specific information, message with friends, and check email on occasion with maybe some audio/video support once in a while then one of the newer smart phones may be your best bet... like iPhone, Driod, or Blackberry. The displays are tiny, so not the best as a reader or even surfing large interactive web pages or watching movies... but they are excellent for telecom, music, audio books and messaging/email. Again, the robustness of the OS and the available apps vary between devices, so determine which features and capabilities are important for you before making any decisions. This is a particularly viable option if you already have a cell phone and can trade it in for a new fancy phone under your current clan/provider.

From the parameters you stated, I would recommend the Kindle Fire or XO Vision Ematic eGlide (both support Android apps) because they are smaller, lighter and less expensive (1/4 to 1/3 the price) than the iPad and don't have all the bells and whistles (that you probably aren't going to use anyway) jacking up the price.

bartwin's picture
bartwin

I have so  much fun with the Paprika app in the kitchen. It's the main reason I bought the iPad, though there are lots of other uses as others have noted.   Check it out on their website and see what others say about it if you are interested in a great recipe manager.

KMIAA's picture
KMIAA

graphic editing.  I love working with graphics and use Paint Shop Pro.  I do have Photoshop but never got around to learning it.  Other than saving recipes and getting email, I'll probably pass on the IPad.  I do save my recipes to my hard drive, plus do a backup of my files, in case of crashes.  I probably would just use it for email, so I think I'll pass on it for now.

PlicketyCat's picture
PlicketyCat

One thing to consider when shopping for a tablet computer specifically for the kitchen is how you prefer to use your current physical recipes.

If you like 4x6 or 3x5 recipe/index cards, then a 7" tablet with a foodie app installed would likely work best for your style.

If you like full 8 1/2 x 11 pages in a binder or standard-sized "hardback" cookbooks, then a 10" tablet with a foodie app installed would likely work best for your style.

The biggest contenders are iOS (Mac/Apple) and iApps, and Android (virtually everything not Mac/Apple) and Android Apps. Both operating systems (OS) and supported apps are comparable... one may be better than another at one thing but worse at another, it's a net wash. There are currently more iApps available because they've been around longer and iDevices were available first and marketed so strongly; however, the Android apps are catching up and nearly all the remaining market share uses or supports Android so you likely won't have to wait too long to find a comparable app. So, the decision really comes down to platform/brand loyalty and preference. If you're a Mac/Apple follower then iDevices, iOS & iApps are a great fit. If you're a PC follower than the rest of the devices, OS, and apps are probably a better fit.

Mac users will probably never truly like non-Apple products, and non-Mac users will probably never truly like Apple products and will possibly be faced with multiple operating systems and supported programs (that aren't always compatible) much like PC with Windows, Linux, etc.

There are several foodie apps out there for computers, tablets and other devices and they all have their pros and cons. Some have really intuitive interfaces, some have robust linking and organization capabilities, some are great for meal planning and shopping lists. However, there are great apps with huge cons out there, too (limited print or sharing support, no inventory control tracking, minimal scaling support etc). Which app you get and on which platform/device greatly depends on what features you want and what's important (or not important) for you. If you shop around and test-drive several free trial editions on the device you want to use most, I'm sure you'll find an app that does at least most of what you want regardless of platform or device. If you're already using an app on one device, and you really like it, check around to see if it's available in a version that is supported on a device you're interested in.... but DON'T buy a device that you may not need simply because there is a seemingly cool app available for it, test-drive the app and the device first and see if there are other less expensive or more useful-to-you-options before you buy.

I used to be an addicted gadget geek working in the tech field... it's a hard habit to break, but an easy one to fall into. New devices and nifty apps are like crack cocaine being pushed by the most manipulative dealer on the corner!!