The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Peter Reinhart's Multigrain Extraordinaire - converted to sourdough

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Peter Reinhart's Multigrain Extraordinaire - converted to sourdough

This is the recipe I love from Peter Reinhart's Bread Baker Apprentice. This bread makes a great toast. The bread has 16% grains which contribute to the sweetness and fantastic aroma. The bread is very moist from many grains that hold the moisture and contribute to the natural sweetness. 


The recipe also contains brown rice that can be substituted by white rice or wild rice, but brown rice seems to blend in the best. I used white rice as I had some left over frozen from few weeks ago.



"White rice can be seen in the crumbs. It made the crumb so moist."




The original recipe is a straight dough, i.e. using commercial yeast without any pre-ferment flour. I always wanted to try converting a commercial yeasted bread into sourdough and see what the taste difference it would be. As a relatively novice bread baker, I also wanted to test my baker percentage calculation.

The intant yeast in original recipe is replaced by sourdough starter in liquid levain form. The original recipe is for 2-pound loaf, which means I need to use the baker's math to calculate recipe for desired final weight, 3.5+ pounds for two large loaves. It was fun using the baker's math. I felt like yelling 'bingo' when I finished the calculation.




I find Peter Reinhart's original recipe is very sticky, almost too sticky to work with.  So, I reduced the hydration to 74%, which is still a relatively wet dough (maybe because it also has about 4% of honey in it) . I also substitute 20% of bread flour with whole wheat flour. The original recipe also has honey and brown sugar that I also reduced both amount by half as the bread would be naturally sweet by long fermentation and grain soaker.

I just realised that I pretty much changed most of the Reinhart formula. Basically, the ingredients remain the same, but their amount were changed.


What is the result?, you might ask, after the convertion to sourdough and many ingredient changes. Well, the flavour profile changes substantially which, I believe, is resulted from using sourdough starter. It introduces acidity and tang into the bread which is non-existent in the original version. The sourdough version also has tender and moist crumbs. It is not as sweet as the original. Do I like it enough to do it again? Yes, this recipe is a keeper.



 


For more details and recipe you can visit the blog here: http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/2010/11/peter-reinharts-multigrain.html


 Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/

Comments

Franko's picture
Franko

Nicely done Sue!


It's a really pretty looking loaf, with a good flavour profile from the sounds of it.


Franko

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Yes, it's a one tasty loaf. Polenta (coarse cornmeal) really is a sweet grain. It contributes a lot to the sweetness of the loaves, not to mention other grains, whole wheat, honey and brown sugar that are in the loaves, which all play a part to the flavour.


The sourdough version provide another flavour dimension to this bread as well.


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/