The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

My makeshift portable proofing bag

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jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

My makeshift portable proofing bag

I have seen posts from the good folks on TFL posting various ways to proof their dough when the weather becomes too cold for their dough to rise and there were some very clever suggestions but which involved a degree of electrical know-how and handywork, both of which I lack.   So I came up with a very economical foam padded cooler bag (under US$5.00) for transporting cakes that needs to be kept cool from my local baking DIY shop which also fits my 2.5 qt/2.4 litre mixing bowl  nicely.  I have a very old buckwheat neck pillow which can be heated up in the microwave for a couple of mins and stays fairly warm for at least half an hr.or more and I can either leave this inside the cooler bag to warm up the interior before putting in the bowl with the dough or if direct contact wiht the glass is not recommended, then I can leave the bag to rest on top of the pillow.  I've not tested this yet as the weather is still comfortably cool here in HK but just in case we are hit with some very cold weather where the temp falls to 5-8C this may become quite handy.  



 


 

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

I like this idea, and I'll apply it with the coming summer in Australia.


Last night was the first time I mixed my bread dough when the temperature is 28c (82F). I only started making bread six months ago when it was in autumn. So, I can use my padded picnic bag to proof my dough when the summer is here and the temperature can go up to mid 30c for many days in a row.


Thanks for the sharing the idea.


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/


Sue

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

I wouldn't suggest using this method in the summer as this would only make the dough even hotter and mess up with the fermenttion, unless you're using a coolant/ice pack instead of a heat pad.  As I mentioned, I havent' tested  this method yet and I will only heat it up slightly to start with as I do not have central heating in the house and it can get miserably cold in my house as it faces north.

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

I've been looking for low tech incubators for my yogurt, and that might work for that too.


My favorite trick is to turn my microwave into a "proofing box" by heating a cup of water and then putting the dough in there to rise.  The microwave is already insulated and will stay between 70 and 80 degrees F for 8 or more hours.


If someone needs to use the microwave, it's generally only for a few minutes.  I just reheat the water and put the dough back in.  

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

on high for 2 mins or less but wiithout the glass of hot water as it's not big enough to fit the cup of water and the mixing bowl. Would the steam, in such close proximity to the dough, be too humid for the dough? The bag was just a silly idea I came up with in case I want to keep the dough in my bedroom to save me getting up and going into the kitchen to check my dough :)


Judy