The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bumpy Bagels

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mershadow1's picture
mershadow1

Bumpy Bagels

I have seen other people adress this same problem, but have never heard a solution.  I make and deliver bagels here in my home-town and my business is steadily growing.  I use the bagel recipe from the King Arthur website. 


They taste great, but they are always, always  bumpy. When they are boiled they shrivel up as usual, but when they bake they puff out and look great straight out of the oven, but as they cool down they become bumpy again. :(


Help!  Anyone?

LindyD's picture
LindyD

The KAF bagel recipes I found use bread flour.  That's a bit of a surprise since Jeffrey Hamelman, who heads the KAF Bakery and Baking Education Center, has published the best recipe for NY bagels and it uses only high gluten flour, water, salt, yeast, and diastatic malt.


Not sure how you shape them, but rolling four ounces of dough into a log has always resulted in a nice smooth crust for me.  


What do you mean by "bumpy"?


Edited to add this video by Ciril Hitz which should be helpful.

mershadow1's picture
mershadow1

Thanks so much LindyD for your response.  I am an almost complete bread novice, so bear with me.  I thought Bread Flour and High Gluten flour are the same thing??


"Bumpy" as in the gluten structure has recessed indentations in it.  I think the deal may really be that I have never mastered the rolled out dough log technique.  It always unravels for me whilst boiling. I use the ball, and punch a hole in it method.  This may be the real problem.


Thank you for the video link.  I can't look now, but SHALL.

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Hi mershadow,


Bread flour has 12 percent protein; high gluten has 14 percent - it's a much stronger flour and produces a wonderfully chewy crumb.


The Hitz video is fantastic and I hope you get a chance to view it.


If you use the log technique, just wrap it around your hand, then squeeze the two ends together and roll, to smooth them out.


Keep at it and you'll get those bagels to perfection!

Chuck's picture
Chuck

Terms like "All Purpose Flour", "Bread Flour", and "High Gluten Flour" are 'marketing terms' that are not standardized and tend to differ from one brand of flour to the next.


In the U.S. brands will typically have at least two grades (maybe more:-), with their "Bread Flour" having a higher gluten content than their "All Purpose Flour".


The King Arthur Flour brand has three grades (only two of which are typically available in supermarkets). Their highest gluten flour they call "Sir Lancelot", and the easiest way to obtain it may be to order it off their website.

Yippee's picture
Yippee

(i.e. 1st rise) and shape the bagels immediately after the dough is kneaded, let the bagels rise until puffy (but be careful not to overprove), then  boil and bake as usual.  This should solve your problem.


Yippee