The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

David's Vermont SD w/ increased rye ---response to cast iron bake

  • Pin It
trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

David's Vermont SD w/ increased rye ---response to cast iron bake

I have posted my cast iron bakes quite a few times over the past years . Seeing the new-found interest in Tartine and the cast iron bake I thought I would post my bake today to illustrate how well the "usual" sourdough responds.


 


This formula yields a very full flavored bread with a finish aroma that is rich and full of grain. The crumb is very tender and the crust is quite crisp. I love the caramel taste that a bold bake yields and this formula gives it back 100 fold. The bread has great keeping qualities...that is if no one is home  ! It goes very well with an aged cheese and a ripe pear, I just tried that combo a minute ago. It also makes wonderful toast. It has become my every week bake for a month or so. This particular batch retarded for 2 days , due to life intervening. It didn't make a huge difference in the sour but did increase the fullness of the flavor I think . Don't hesitate to retard an extra day or so. 


I use the word usual but David's breads are anything but as you know if you have tried his formulas. I have a very old cast iron covered pot that was my mother-in-law's and I have a Le Creuset . The pots are different sizes but the dough doesn't mind at all. The pots are preheated at 500 degrees for 30 minutes. They are sitting on my stone as they preheat. I remove them from the oven and uncover them, lower the risen loaves into the pots using parchment paper . I mist lightly with water and then place the lids back on the pots. I  place both pots back into the oven and lower the temp to 460. I bake for 20 min. covered and then remove the lids and bake 15 more minutes. I like a bold bake , you will note the caramelization. I have never had the bread burn or had any variation in the finish temp. I bake to 213 degrees or so and both pots give me identical loaves as far as shape/color/flavor/finish temp. etc. Here are some pics to illustrate. 


rising: Photobucket slashed: Photobucket in the cast iron pot: Photobucket Le Creuset pot: Photobucket finished product: Photobucket crumb: Photobucket

Comments

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I appreciate the side-by-side comparison of baking in the cast iron and Le Creuset ovens. The loaves are indistinguishable, to my eyes.


I may just have to give my Le Creuset ovens a chance. I have a 7 qt round one and 5 qt oval. I just fed the starter for some Tartine Basic Country Loaves. 


Thanks for the detailed procedures!


David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Just in case David, you have... the phenolic knobs are oven safe up to 450F, higher they can crack...you may have the stainless steel knobs?? My 9qt has the phenolic knob...but I have similar brand with the stainless steel knobs and smaller sized dutch ovens, better suited for baking bread, 5 quart I think is what's recommended for the no knead dutch oven breads..or you can order stainless steel knobs for the LeCreuset dutch ovens.


Sylvia

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

My Le Creuset ovens both have phenolic knobs. I understand covering the knobs with foil will protect them from heat damage. I hope that's true!


David

wildeny's picture
wildeny

Why will the foil protect the knob from melting? The foil is heat-conducted, so it stays the same temperature with the oven. It's not heat-insulated material. I can't understand.


Why not take off the knob?

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Beautiful breads and comparison! Thanks for the side by side!  Everytime I see loaves baked in the dutch ovens, it reminds of the no knead breads...the dutch ovens are so great for  baking loaves!  I saw the ones yesterday on Amazon.com that are used for 'Tartine' loaves...I like the idea of the bottom piece having low sides for easier access to get your bread into the hot dutch oven...but I sure don't know what I would do with another dutch oven :) but it is so cool...it had two working pieces!


Sylvia

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

And thank you for the side by side baking.  Nice looking pots too!

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

Hey david, I have been traveling so much these past months and have missed the forum's goings on. I will have to do a post on " how a starter survives a neglectful owner " LOL. 


I was hoping the comparison would get everyone to start using their pots. I have a phenolic knob but it has not been damaged. I used to cover it but haven't in a long time. Your formula stands as one of the most tasty yet. I believe it will be my " go to " bread till you put another in my way. My LC pot is a 7.5, the castiron is smaller but I have not measured it. The breads don't spread so you can use any moderate/large size.


 


Hey Sylvia ! Thank you. I haven't seen the "special " pots. These are  just fine and like you I sure don't need anymore pots. 


 


Hi Mini oven ! Thank you ! I hope it helps others to expand their  repertoire of baking formulas and techniques. I know I love learning something new here on TFL. c

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Carolyn. (I'm using Sylvia's version of your name, since I trust her memory better than my own. Is this a mistake?)


I forgot to point out in my earlier response that, while I'm flattered by your crediting me with the recipe, it is actually Jeff Hamelman's "Vermont Sourdough with Increased Whole Grain" from "Bread." 


My Basic Country Bread from "Tartine Bread" is proofing, and I'm going to bake the two boules in two different types of "cloches," as you did. I'll post the results tonight or tomorrow. 


David

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi David


It appears you and I are doing very similar bakes this weekend. I received my copy of Tartine two days ago, giving me enough time to do a read through and decide to try Robertson's Basic Country Bread using his cloche method. I'll bake one of the two loaves in the cloche and the other on the stone just for comparison. Should be interesting.


Franko

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

It is " ine" but all of my friends simply call me " c" for short...since I am only 5'2" that is appropriate. 


As to the formula...I did make a couple changes so I guess it belongs to all of us now with the original due to Hamelman. I just weigh out my starter and use it in place of making a preferment/levain build. I also used my rye starter for this batch. Love the grain flavor that my really increased grain gave to it. c