The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Cinnamon-Raisin Bread

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amolitor's picture
amolitor

Cinnamon-Raisin Bread

This basically Joe Ortiz' idea. The underlying loaf is a challah (a not terribly sweet, not terribly rich challah, just a nice one). I made up his recipe last night, which produces 2.5 pounds of dough (6 cups of flour, to give you an idea of how much dough). I think you could use any challah or brioche, but I do like the 'not too sweet, not too rich' part. If you go too sweet or too rich, I think you just get a giant cinnamon roll (not that this is a bad thing..)


Anyways. This makes two loaves, and into each loaf knead (at the very end of kneading) 4-6 ounches of raisins (amount to taste -- these have about 4 ounces of raisins per loaf). Rise and so on per instructions for your challah recipe.


Make up a glaze: a whole egg (or about half an egg is enough, really, for two loaves) beaten with a little milk.


Make up some cinnamon sugar: 2-3 Tablespoons sugar and 1-2 Teaspoons ground cinnamon (vary amounts according to taste), per loaf. The loaves below are right around the middle -- about 2.5 T sugar, 1.5 tsp cinnamon each.


When it's time to form up loaves:



  1. Make up each loaf as a loose round and let rest 10 minutes.

  2. Flatten each round out to an oblong 12-18 inches or more long, and roughly as wide as your loaf pans are long. As long as possible, really.

  3. Place the oblong with one end toward you.

  4. Paint the surface of the flattened oblong with the egg glaze, except at the far end leaving and 1 to 1.5 inches un-painted.

  5. Sprinkle the cinnamon sugar mixture over the painted part. You should get a nice layer, covering the dough completely with a moderately thick layer (1/8" maybe? A little less?)

  6. Roll up starting at the end near you, and stretching as you go: roll a little, then kind of tug the rolled-up part gently toward your belly as you roll more. You're trying to maximize the number of turns you can get out of the oblong before it's all rolled up.

  7. Seal using the unpainted far end.

  8. Flip the roll over, seam side down, tuck and fuss with the ends a bit to try to seal them a bit.

  9. Place in GREASED AND FLOURED loaf pan! Greasing AND flouring might be a bit much, but these loaves can get mighty sticky what with the egg in the dough, and the sugar, and everything.


Bake per instructions, but a bit longer. Say another 5 to 8 minutes. I glazed the top of each loaf with the egg/milk glaze just before loading into the oven, and again after 15 minutes.




 

Comments

tmarz's picture
tmarz

Did you write down your challah recipe? I would love to try and make what you created.

amolitor's picture
amolitor

It's Joe Ortiz' recipe! What I wrote up in my post is my expansion of some very quick notes that appear in a sidebar of _The_Village_Baker_ so I don't feel like I'm copying anything. I don't really want to copy his recipe out, though, since.. well, it's his recipe!


If you have a copy of The Village Baker it's the challah recipe in there.


Otherwise, this one: http://allrecipes.com//Recipe/Challah-I/Detail.aspx looks pretty close (not too many eggs, not too much fat, some sugar). Joe's uses sugar instead of honey, and that recipe looks like it would make three of the loaves I made, instead of two. Oh, and he (and I) use bread flour, not AP.

tmarz's picture
tmarz

Sorry, me not really owning a whole lot of books didn't realize he was a baker... I thought it might have been your name. I totally respect that. I was looking at that recipe and was curious. if you are subing sugar for honey, do you think you might a little more water? since one is liquid and one is dry. i would assume so, I just wouldn't know how much.

amolitor's picture
amolitor

In hindsight, I should have mentioned that Joe's an author and a baker, eh?!


If it were ME I'd just sub sugar straight across, and then adjust flour, but then, I never measure flour anyways ;) I always add flour until the texture is "right". If you wanted to be precise, yeah, I expect some water would be a good idea..


http://www.ehow.com/how_2099210_substitute-sugar-honey-recipes.html


has some suggestions for ratios.


I'm pretty sure Joe's recipe had a bit less sweetener than allrecipes.com one calls for, in fact. The ehow suggestion would be for, um, 5/8 cup sugar and 1/8 cup liquid, so that's about 10 tablespoons of sugar and 2 tablespoons liquid (assuming I've done the math right). I think I'd do maybe 6 to 8 tablespoons of sugar, a 2 tablespoons of liquid.


Then I'd do 2/3 of the recipe, and make up two loaves, just to make the arithmetic completely insane!


 

tmarz's picture
tmarz

I tried it last night... it turned out wonderful! I love the Idea of using a little egg wash to get the cinnamon to stick, it really works! and I just made that whole recipe you linked. It made two nice loaves. and I made it before I heard back from you about adding a little water, I might have made it a little more moist, but they were still plenty good! and Everyone loved it! 


 


Thanks!

amolitor's picture
amolitor

Hurrah! I'm delighted to hear someone getting some use from my scattered throughts!