The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

No-Knead success - add kneading

livingdog's picture
livingdog

No-Knead success - add kneading

I have been concentrating on a "no-knead" recipe (the famous one from the NYT) to try and get it just right. Here is the final result. The close-up image is fuzzy since I only have a cell phone camera. The flavor was my best ever.


You have to knead the bread in order for it not to adhere to anything it touches. Just folding will leave you with a soup mixture of dough. If you watch the video you will see a goopy mess of a dough which, in the next shot, magically turns into a silky consistent dough ball with some structure.


I then guessed that 2 hours of 2nd rise was too long. The dough just seems to flatten out in the oven. So I let it rise for only 1 hour.


The first bake period was for 30 mins @ 450 in a covered cloche. (The video says a covered pot, or a cast iron pot. I use a La Cloche cloche.)


The second bake period was for 15 mins @ 450 uncovered. When I saw the crust forming dark brown spots I knew it was time for the AL foil.


I covered the bread with heavy duty AL foil and let it continue to cook for anohter 10 mins @ 450. (This was my last problem - I was still getting slightly undercooked crumb.)


As it turned out even the bottom of the crust is a nice gentle brown - not burned as in my first attempts.


 


Success with kneading no-knead dough:




 


Also I want to thank everyone with their helpful suggestions. May God richly bless you all, in Jesus' name, amen! :)


 


-ld (Ecc. 9:1-4)

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz


You have to knead the bread in order for it not to adhere to anything it touches. Just folding will leave you with a soup mixture of dough. If you watch the video you will see a goopy mess of a dough which, in the next shot, magically turns into a silky consistent dough ball with some structure.



A lot of us manage to make "no knead bread" without kneading. It's not magic, though it feels like it when you master it.


It's a matter of learning to handle highly hydrated doughs.  It takes practice and some tricks--for example, using a dough scraper helps, and learning to create a "skin" or "gluten cloak" with a very light dusting of flour to help the boule hold together when its stretched and folded.  


If you search here for "stretch and fold" you'll see lots of examples of handling wet doughs and how as few as one or two stretch and folds can "align the gluten strands" and make the dough smooth and silky.  


Practice, practice, practice.