The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Latest experiment with Jeffrey Hamelman's whole wheat multigrain sourdough

  • Pin It
MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Latest experiment with Jeffrey Hamelman's whole wheat multigrain sourdough

Whole wheat multigrain sourdough from Jeffrey Hamelman's Bread cookbook is the bread that I bake quite often. I really like the mild sweetness from honey and the aroma from the mix of honey, whole wheat flour and grains. It got a nice texture and taste. I am always amazed at how sweet the bread is for a little amount of honey in it.


I wanted to try experimenting Peter Rienhart's whole wheat flour soaker with this WW multigrain loaves. I was so impressed with the 100% whole wheat sandwich loaf from Peter Rienhart's Wholegrain Bread. It delivered a tasty and soft crumb loaf (the details of that bake is here: http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/2010/10/100-wholewheat-sandwich-bread-peter.html.)


I was so curious to see what the difference Peter Reinhart's soaker method will deliver to the bread that I baked often and know its taste and texture profile.


Well, what can go wrong with matching technique and recipe of the two bread masters I admire the most, Jeffrey Hamelman and Peter Reinhart. 


The soaker method didn't dissappoint. It delivered more open and softer crumbs. I don't know if I was only imagining...but I think, by using soaker method, the WW multigrain also tastes nicer and sweeter. The taste and aroma from honey is more pronounced. All and all, I'm happy with incoporating soaker method to whole wheat recipe..and will definitely do it again in my future WW bake.


More photos and recipe can be found in the below link.


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/2010/10/lastest-experiment-with-whole-wheat.html



 



Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/

Comments

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

but the sweetness you feel comes mostly from the soaking itself (enzymes release sugars). I love this method, and I really like the crumb of your bread!

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Thanks for sharing the info.


Now, I understand better about that amazing sweetness of this bread. I'm also guessing that types of grain also contribute to the sweetness and aroma of the bread. I read it somewhere that polenta (cornmeal) greatly contributes to the sweetness. 


Sue

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

I don't know if corn flour sweetens the bread, but there are ways to know:


-try a 1-day soaker (with the same method, cold water and salt) and taste it


-try to grab the technical specification and read the value of "falling number(seconds)". The lower the number the higher the amylatic activity (thus the sweetness). This is an indirect testing method according to this link.


Rye flour works equally well.

wally's picture
wally

And I will bet that the whole wheat soaker contributed to the sweetness.


Larry

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Thank you and I think it is. I think the whole wheat soaker could have played some role in the sweetness.

teketeke's picture
teketeke

This is awesome!! You did a great job!  Using a thermometer is very effective, isn't?  I realized that it is very important! 


Best wishes,


Akiko

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Yes, having a thermometer is very handy. It's one of those baking gadgets that makes I think why shouldn't I have it long time ago:) 


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/