The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Panmarino from The Italian Baker

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Panmarino from The Italian Baker

I just got this book by Carol Fields, and it seems pretty nice.  If anyone has it, I would love to know your favorites.


 


This past weekend I made "Panmarino"   - very simple recipe, excellent flavor.   My Breville oven doesn't allow me to generate steam properly, so the crust doesn't look as beautiful as it would with a nice steam going, but still it turned out excellent, a real keeper


 


Here is the recipePANMARINO (ROSEMARY BREAD)
(adapted from Carol Field)


2 tsp active dry yeast
1/2 cup warm water
1/2 cup milk, at room temperature
4.5 T olive oil
1.5 to 2 T fresh rosemary leaves, chopped fine (or 3/4 T dried)
10 g salt
450 g all purpose flour
1 tsp coarse sea salt for sprinkling over the bread


Mix the warm water with the yeast in a large bowl, wait for a few minutes until it gets bubbly. Stir the milk and oil with the paddle blade. Add the rosemary leaves, flour, and salt to the bowl. Mix gently until the flour is moistened, change to the dough hook and knead on low speed for 5 minutes. Remove the dough and knead by hand for a couple of minutes.


Place the dough inside an oiled bowl, cover, and let it rise at room temperature until doubled, about 1.5 hours. Carefully remove from the bowl, shape into a ball, and let it rise for 45 to 55 minutes, but don't allow it to double in size.


As you wait for the final rise, heat the oven to 450F. Slash the bread with a razor blade forming an asterisk on top, then sprinkle coarse salt inside the cuts. Bake 10 minutes with steam, reduce the oven temperature to 400F and bake for 35 minutes more. Remove the bread to a rack to cool, and don't cut it for at least one hour.


 



 


If anyone is interested in a full description, you can jump to my blog here


http://bewitchingkitchen.com/2010/10/28/panmarino/

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

This book is one of my favorites. It is sitting right beside the computer because I was looking at recipes for an olive rosemary bread both here and in the book. Do you think I could add well drained Kalamata olives to this dough? Every Christmas I make the filled bread, Gubana, it is well worth the time that it takes to collect all the ingredients.

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

You know, I was thinking just that as we enjoyed the last slice yesterday... (also the bread kept for quite some time at room temperature, probably due to the milk and olive oil in the formula)


I bet it would be awesome with the black olives, and maybe some sundried tomatoes...  :-)


 


It's the first bread I bake from the book, I have my eyes set on the mushroom bread, that uses soaked porcini and the water goes in the dough too - just thinking about it makes me a little weak in the knees....


 


Let me know which breads you particularly like...

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

Olives worked out just fine, didn't have the sun-dried tomato but maybe next time...  

Franko's picture
Franko

 


I think your really going to enjoy the book Sally. I've had it for close to twenty years now and I still come back to it often. Lot's of good recipes and ideas to keep you going for quite awhile. Two of my favourites are the Pesto Bread on pg 149, and the Casatiello on pg 144.


The Pan Marino is the first bread I made after joining TFL earlier this year and it's a good one. At the time I hadn't quite figured out how to upload photo's, but I did save the pictures. Here's one of them.


Best Wishes,


Franko


SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

very nice crumb, more open than mine -


 


I had noticed the pesto bread - and mentally marked it as a possibility...


 


I see lots of 'experiments" in my future....  ;-)

Rosalie's picture
Rosalie

The recipe looked so good that I decided to try it.  My way.  First of all, I don't use refined flour any more, but fresh flour from my NutriMill.  Second, I've taken to making mini-pitas, which fit more into my single lifestyle - freeze them, then pull out one at a time and stick into the toaster.


I wasn't sure how it would work, since all the pita recipes I've seen have only flour, water, yeast, and salt, maybe some oil.  This one also had milk and rosemary.  And I've never understood the magic of pita.  So this was going to be an experiment.


I worked from the original recipe and ground up the full complement of grain - 900g.  I got the rosemary from my back yard (one of the benefits of living in a Mediterranean climate) and chopped it up (pulverized it?) in my food processor.  I used 1 teaspoon ADY and skipped the salt decoration (which I wouldn't have used anyway).  I used less salt in the dough than called for (1 T instead of 4 t) and should probably have skimped more.  After working it up and kneading, I stuck it in the fridge overnight.


This morning I pulled it out, and I finally got to it a couple hours ago.  Using my usual method, I made pitas.  And they worked.  Not all of them puffed up, but about 90% did.  I'm still wondering about the magic of pita.


Rosalie

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Rosalie, what a creative idea you had!  Now you got me craving for homemade rosemary pita!  :-)


 


I only made pita twice, first time was not very good, but my second attempt worked like a charm.  I think 90% ballooning is pretty awesome!


 


 

Rosalie's picture
Rosalie

I've been making pitas regularly ever since I discovered them, and I have them pretty much down to a science.  I get recipes from different sources, but they're usually pretty much the same recipe.  And I use the same procedure each time, so lack of success is generally a surprise.  The panmarino ones that didn't puff properly still puffed a little bit.  Maybe it's in how carefully I form the balls.  I wish I knew.


Rosalie

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Really liked this one, excellent flavor, much better crumb structure than Reinhart's BBA


 


I post a coupld of photos, and a link to my blog in case anyone is interested.   It uses a biga, final fermentation is only 3 hours.


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.com/2010/11/15/ciabatta-a-classic-italian-bread/