The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

What kind of bread is this?

butterflygrooves's picture
butterflygrooves

What kind of bread is this?

I have this recipe but I have no idea what kind of bread it is, can someone give me a clue?


Annie's Rosemary and Garlic Bread


3 cups bread flour (more if needed for dough consistency)
1 tsp salt
2 1/4 tsp active yeast
1 tbsp sugar
1 1/2 cups lukewarm water (110 degrees)
1/4 cup chopped fresh rosemary
3-6 cloves minced garlic
2 tsp kosher or sea salt
1/3 cup of olive oil


Mix together the water, yeast, sugar and half of the rosemary. Add 1 tsp salt to the flour, then add the flour and salt to the yeast mixture, slowly, until the dough is able to form a ball. Knead on a well floured board or table for 10 minutes. Place dough in a well oiled bowl, cover, and let sit in a warm place until it doubles in size (about an hour).

Mix together the oil, rosemary and garlic. Punch dough down, and knead a few times to make it easy to handle. Shape dough into 2 loaves and place several inches apart on a baking sheet. Score the loaves and pour the oil mixture on top of them. Sprinkle each loaf with the kosher salt. Allow to rise for 30 minutes.

Pre-heat oven to 350. Bake for 15 minutes, until golden. Tip: place a bowl of cold water in the oven to make it steamy and keep things moist.


 


I made the recipe following the directions exactly the first time, the loaves came out flat like focaccia but with a softer texture.  It was delicious and soft.


Yesterday I tried it without the rosemary in the dough and without the rosemary and garlic oil mixture on top.  I divided the dough between 2 loaf pans (I wanted to see if it would rise like sandwich bread), put a little olive oil and salt on top and baked it.  It never rose above the top of the pan, creating a 2 inch tall loaf.  It was still delicious and soft and spongy.


Today I used 2/3 AP and 1/3 WW flour (regular, not bread flour) and again omitted the rosemary and garlic and made rolls instead of loaves.  The rolls are soft and spongy, the crust is also soft (not chewy, easy to bite through).




Any idea what I can call this bread?


 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Why not call it (without all the herbs garlic and oil)  Annie's Basic Bread


I think the recipe makes one loaf, no need to make two in loaf pans.  Two might work better without a form.   (I might drop the cold bowl of water in the oven tip.)


Looks like a recipe that can be played around with easily.  Add your observations to the recipe, or write up a new card, date and have fun!

flournwater's picture
flournwater

I agree with Mini.  Have you tried dimpling a flattened portion of this dough (without degasing it) on a cookie sheet and then drizzling the oil mixture over it? 


With 103% hydration it must be more like pancake batter than bread dough.  Not even focaccia is that wet.  I'm gonna give it a try.  Looks like it makes some pretty nice rolls.


It drives me nuts when a recipe says "place a bowl of cold water in the oven to make it steamy and keep things moist".  "Cold" water doesn't make steam and the instructions don't tell you when to put the water into the oven or how much water to use.  I recognize that an experienced bread baker is going to know how to handle that step but it's unfair to write an instruction like that without a better explanation for the novice to follow.


 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I thought it was closer to 100%... depends on who's cups.  (I was thinking 240g per cup for water and 230 for flour.)  The bread flour may absorb lots...  label it a foccacia until we find out what's wetter than a foccacia.   Anyone know the outer limits to foccacia dough?


This could be whipped out in no time flat.  A yeasted quick bread?

flournwater's picture
flournwater

 


Hi Mini 


Are your "cups" 4.5 ounces?  That's what I typically use (127 grams) as a conversion.


I'm open to new ideas ....

RonRay's picture
RonRay

My AP Flour weighs in at 120g/cup, while my HG Bread Red 12% has 146g/cup, and of course, the moisture varies with local and seasonal conditions. So, I guess a cup is seldom a cup and thus a scale is a bakers better friend. ;-)


Ron

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

with added herbs or can be sandwich loaf!


Sylvia

butterflygrooves's picture
butterflygrooves

The dough is pretty wet, definitely thicker than pancake batter though.  I end up adding 1/2 cup of extra flour so that it can form a ball and then kneading in up to 1 more cup.  If the extra flour isn't added it will stick to the bowl/counter/everything it touches, the dough is still sticky when I put in in the bowl for the first rise.


I'm going to try to make it without adding the extra 1/2 cup of flour and see if it is kneadable.


If anyone decideds to make this, let me know what you come out with.

RonRay's picture
RonRay

I'd go with Mini Oven's suggestion - Call it a foccacia !


I make it 98.6%HL with the AP flour I use, and just a few calories in there, as well ;-)


butterflygrooves's picture
butterflygrooves

Holy calories!!!  Maybe I shouldn't eat so much of this stuff...

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Well, that is for an active person that eats nothing else that day, it would be okay...ROFL


 


Ron