The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Article on Tartine Bakery

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GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

Article on Tartine Bakery

The new issue of San Francisco magazine has a cover story about Tartine Bakery.  The gist of it is that Chad Robertson is master of the SF bread universe.  There's a blurb about the cookbook and one about Guisto's.  Great bread porn pix.  The article doesn't appear to be available on-line.  


Glenn

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello, I visited Tartine Bakery yesterday morning on my last day in SF! Didn't get to taste Mr. Robertson's bread but did have a wonderful frangipane croissant and cafe au lait for breakfast while perusing the display copy of the Tartine Bread book. Had to leave with a copy of my own...a fantastic work & can't wait to try making some of that bread. Too bad about the magazine article not being available online...would have liked to read it.   Regards, breadsong  PS Go Giants!

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Thought I'd google it, and was happy to find:
http://www.sanfranmag.com/story/breaking-bread


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

It's a very good article. 


David

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

'nuff said

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

Glad they posted it on their website.


Glenn

rossnroller's picture
rossnroller

That's a fascinating article. Topical for me, too, as it happens - I've been trying to make the point on a thread at another forum that sourness is not necessarily a benchmark of quality, or a defining characteristic, of SD bread. I'm certain there are many here who would share that view, but I'm a lone voice on the thread so far. In fact, some of the responses have been downright hostile, one guy all but accusing me of heresy in merely expressing such a perspective on a sourdough forum. That's the net for ya!


Anyway, timely to come across the article. Wish I could sample a chunk off one of Chad Robertson's country loaves...


Cheers
Ross

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Glenn,


Thanks for posting this thought-provoking article. 


Hi Ross,


Interesting to read your post. You're not alone! I was just reading John Downes' advice on what to look for when judging a sourdough loaf at competition level and he mentions preferring a balance between wheat-based flavours and sour, rather than too great a sourness. He also offers some interesting thoughts on what he feels are the appropriate aesthetics of crust and crumb for a hearth bread. 


http://sourdough.com/blog/johnd/judging-sourdough-bread-and-artisan-breads


Helped me to clarify some things I have been trying to think through. I'm assuming you have read this text on the other board - may be interesting to others, though?


Kind regards, Daisy_A

rossnroller's picture
rossnroller

Yes, I have read the John Downes post you linked to. I always find his posts fascinating. He was interviewed on ABC Radio a couple of years back while resident in England. It's too long ago to be in the online archives of the ABC, but a staff member forwarded me a copy in MP3 format, which I embedded on one of my blog posts: Sourdough Rising - The Home Artisan Bread Baking Revolution. You might be interested in having a listen (you'll see the recording 3/4 of the way down the page).


As you are probably aware, there are some other John Downes posts on Sourdough Companion, including some more recent ones from earlier this year - all insightful and thought-provoking...


He takes no prisoners, does John, but as far as I can discern my taste seems to coincide with his (as does yours, I suspect)...so go John!


Cheers!
Ross

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Ross,


Thanks for posting! I followed the link through and found it very thought provoking. I also heard a good interview with him on 'Stir the Pots' food blog.


I am in accord with JD and yourself in terms of valuing wheaten tastes in hearth breads. I do like sour in sour-based loaves, such as Andrew Whitley's 100% ryes but also really like a complex array of different aromas and tastes in other artisan breads.


However I would like to add, in contrast to the very bleak picture that JD paints of British milling and baking in some (albeit not all), of his posts, that despite poor fare in many places including some of the most currently fashionable bakeries, there are also small and mid scale rural and urban bakeries that are really embedded within their communities. These are providing great breads, including sourdough, traditional British breads and ryes. They are also getting creative with the process and often support local millers! The Oxford Bread Group, for example, distributes bread locally as well as initiating and supporting local growing of heritage wheats.


The website of the Real Bread Campaign is a great place to get up to date information. Their Lammas Day initiative, for example, gives a wider snapshot of some lively bakeries, community food initiatives and mills.


http://www.sustainweb.org/realbread/local_loaves_lammas/


Thought about posting on this on 'the other board' but was worried John might eat me! 


Kind regards, Daisy_A