The Fresh Loaf

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Older Electrolux Assistent Dough Hook Compatibility

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dartboard's picture
dartboard

Older Electrolux Assistent Dough Hook Compatibility

Hey everyone, I've got an Electrolux Assistent that I bought over ten years ago from a kitchen shop at the Tyson's Corner mall in Virginia. The mixer itself looks pretty much like all of the modern Electrolux mixers, but the one difference is that mine did not come with a dough hook -- only the roller and the whisk attachments, etc.  My model is a 450W model according to the bottom of the unit.


I want to get the dough hook for my model, but I cannot figure out how it would attach.  I've looked at videos on youtube, along with pictures, but they never show how the dough hook is attached behind the arm.  Will the dough hook for the newer models work on my older model?  One site I found actually has a separate part number for a 400W and 600W unit dough hook. I have neither of those! :-)


Can anyone offer me any suggestions?


Thanks

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

I have an older DLX2000 - one from when it was called AEG.


You just need one for the 400W mixer (I'm assuming that's right).


 


Here are a couple you tube videos that show how it works. TO be honest, I've used mine three times and didn't find it worth it. Like you, mine didn't come with the dough hook and I bought mine off ebay later. Your roller and scraper works just fine, I think. As I've found it does work exactly how these videos show - not well enough.


 


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzHacHV7im4&feature=player_embedded#!


 


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_Zb4qBinRk&feature=related


 


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6HatnB-ix8&feature=related


This one shows a bit better how the spatula fits into the slot, as they are not using the spatula.


 


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RgWbdcy5Hz8&feature=related


 


Basically, one end fits into the slot where the spatula usually goes and then the spatula goes into the slot of the dough hook. The other top portion of the dough hook you put the peg of the handle/bar that usually pushes down into the roller, it doesn't go far, just through a single ring. This set up keeps the dough hook in the middle of the bowl

dartboard's picture
dartboard

Thank you! Your description helps clarify what I had been seeing in the videos.


I'm aware of the problems people have had with the dough hook (or maybe it should be said "the success people are having with the roller"), but I like to tinker and I also like options, so I'm going to give it a go. I ran into problems with a larger batch of dough the other day and I think the dough hook would have handled it better.


If you are interested in selling your dough hook we can probably work something out. If it's all the same I'd rather pay $35 for a recycled hook that works than to buy a new one. I hope I didn't just force this post to be relocated to a marketplace section.  Anyway... reduce, reuse, recycle.


Thanks again for your help and advice.


db

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

Depending on the age/model number, there are different dough hooks. I saw somwhere that the older hook is 10mm and the newer is  8mm.


See http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/magic_mill_dlx_mixer.aspx and look about 1/3 down the page.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

berryblondeboys, Thank you for posting the links that show the dough hook in use on the DLX. While you seem to think these are examples of the dough hook not working, I suggest you take another look. The first video show an example of what happens when the operator isn't paying attention. The scraper should be removed as soon as it is getting in the way. You can see the gluten has formed and has snagged the scraper and is preventing the dough from circulating around the hook. The need for the scraper is brief. The hook is so efficient at blending ingredients with a little attention using a plastic spatula to keep the sides clean and prevent the climbing up the rod, it isn't long and the scraper is getting in the way.


Both of the last 2 videos show the proper development of the dough with the hook. You do gain efficiency by using the spatula as shown in the video, pulling the dough off the rod as it climbs.


Keep in mind that the objective of the mixer is to mix the ingredients and begin gluten development.  Fermenting along with stretching and folding finishes the process. Over oxygenation is not desired and causes the crumb to turn gray and tasteless. In my experience the DLX dough hook is the tool of choice for producing moderate size batches of perfectly developed dough.


In dough handling, simple is better many times. Take a look at this old mixer in Gerard Rubaud's bakery. The simple and yet elegant motion is all that is needed to produce the finest of breads. Many thanks to MC for her interview with this master baker. You have to look at this video and the others and ask yourself, what do I really know about dough? If this can work, how can I improve my methods in my own kitchen? There is much to learn about developing good dough. I have had to accept that most of what I thought I knew about baking in the beginning, was misguided and wrong. Therein lies the value and strength of this forum.


Eric

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

Eric, I would LOVE IT if you would show in a video how you use your dough hook (and if possible) your scraper and roller. What I find is that I have to stand watch over it constantly and have to 'help' ever 20-30 seconds because I can see tha tthere are parts that get worked, and parts that get left behind. With the roller and scraper, I see parts that get stuck on the roller and so with a small spatula, I seem to forever need to scrape it off the roller to incorporate it.


I've had my DLX for 5 years and I don't seem to get the hang of it.


The old mixer you mentioned kneaded the dough and in an elegant manner  (looked beautiful), but my DLX doesn't do that for me.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

My expensive Nikon unfortunately doesn't do video and at the moment I don't have another decent camera that does. I'll have to beg my daughter for hers and do one. It's really so simple it defies explanation. Start with the liquid and preferment mixed at second level speeds to break up the heavier preferment. Just get yourself a large spoonala and add flour as fast as you can spoon it in while running on the lowest speed. I clean the sides of the bowl and occasionally the scraper as it is running. About when all the ingredients are incorporated I stop the mixer, remove the scraper and cover the bowl with a cloth for 20-30 minutes. During this time the water is more fully absorbed. After the 30 minutes, I start the motor again on low and run for 3-4 minutes, prodding the dough into place off the rod and side walls as needed. Then I stop the motor and cover again with a towel for 5 -10 minutes.


It is important that you wait until this time to adjust the hydration. I don't think I could make an adjustment before this time and not be sorry later. I make a point of keeping track of exactly what I add to the mix and make notes on my recipe for future use. It is much better to know within 1 T how much water I need to arrive at the desired consistency. If the dough isn't cleaning off the sides on second speed after you help it a few times, I'll add a T of flour. I only add 1 at a time. The second speed mix time is usually no longer that 4 minutes. At that time the dough is moderately developed. There isn't a windowpane at this point. That will come after fermenting and stretching and folding later. I will remove the hook sliding my fingers down the hook while removing most of the dough. I then spread the dough across the bottom and use the plastic cover for the first 1 hour ferment.


After the first hour I remove the dough to the counter or a rectangular plastic container that I ferment in that has a thin layer of oil. I can do folding in this container of 8 lbs of dough as it expands.From this point on, I fold as is needed. Usually a 68% hydration dough needs 1 additional stretch/fold after the dough comes out of the bowl but of course that would depend on the mix/flour etc.


Trust me on this. The hook is as easy and functional as you could ask for. You do have to stand over it when the hydration makes it want to climb the hook but once you get the hydration adjusted and it's turning as in the videos you linked to, you can walk away from it for a few minutes.


Some people like to use the mixer like a bread machine. They add the ingredients and mix until you get a window pane. I prefer the folding method.  If that's how you want to bake, let the second speed run time continue for 10-12 minutes and you should be near a well developed dough. You won't need to stretch and fold after that. Shut it off after 10 minutes and pull a plug away from the ball and see if you can stretch it out into a membrane.


Hope his helps.


Eric

Mike Avery's picture
Mike Avery

My cheap Olympus point and shoot does videos pretty well.  Not as well as my newer Kodak Zi8, but well enough.


 


I recently found some videos on my server I took of a mixer throwdown, copmparing a KitchenAid K45SS and an Electrolux DLX using its dough hook.


I tried the roller once.  And went right back to the hook.  It might be slow, but it is gentle and thorough.  I put the videos on http://www.sourdoughhome.com/mixerthrowdown.html


The big issue I see with the hook is the impatience of the user.  My answer?  Set the DLX's timer for 5 minutes, a kitchen timer for 10 minutes and go check your email, have a cup of coffee or something.  When you get back, set the DLX timer for another 5 minutes.


The mixer, and the dough, will do just fine without you.


-Mike


 

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

Glad you understood what I was trying to say.


 


I'm not selling, as I'm giving it another chance (just used it for a second time this weekend). Plus, I might be selling the whole kit and kaboodle in a wee bit as I have a used Hobart n-50 coming my way. If I find it fits my needs better, the DLX will go... but not for awhile as I would hate to regret!

dartboard's picture
dartboard

Hmm, need to choose between a car or the N-50... :-)  Enjoy that, it should be a joy to use.

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

I'm getting it used, so not Sooooo bad, but bad enough.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

For what it's worth, I use my hook nearly exclusively. I find it works well and develops the gluten much more reliably than the roller. I do use the roller to incorporate a preferment into the dough water and other loose type blending where a hook wouldn't work.


To each his own I guess.


Eric

dartboard's picture
dartboard

Yes, this is useful to me. Thank you Eric!

stroys9's picture
stroys9

I'm looking for the manual for this mixer. Also some of the parts didn't come to me with the purchase. Does anyone have any suggestions where I could aquire parts/manual for this machine? Thanks in advance. TRoys