The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

brand new n-50

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ggage's picture
ggage

brand new n-50

I am getting tired of trying to find a good used n-50 and am thinking of just ordering a new one. question is a' are the new ones made as well now as in years past ?? I sort remember someone mentioning something about quality . have the bowls changed over the last years?


Also I'm in Canada and know hobart used to make mixers in Canada as well as Ohio ,is or was there a quality difference ?   Thanks Gage

Leolady's picture
Leolady

When I took my 1947 N50 in for a checkup a few years ago. 


He said I should cherish my old baby because the new ones were good, but mine was built like a brick *hit house. 


He said that it was a truism at Hobart as everywhere else.  They don't make em like they used to.  That does not make a new N50 trash by any means.  And I think it is still the best of its kind made today.


 

Leolady's picture
Leolady

that the bowls have changed in the last 60 years. 


The original bowls were heavy metal that had a tin coating.  These were hard to dent!  They had handy little helper handles which are not used today. 


The new stainless steel bowls are nice bowls and clean easier, but they dent easier than the old bowls.

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

I just won an auction for a N-50. I'm excited to get it and try it out, but I'm about hyperventilating at the nearly $900 for used and WILL be over $900 once I buy the dough hook. I cannot imagine spending over $2000 for a new mixer. When I figure I could buy 6 new Kitchen-aids during that time - kind of puts it in perspective how much more expensive they are. Yet, with used, there's no guarantee... I'm taking a risk and I don't even want to know how much it costs to service them (especially in this expensive DC area).


 


Didn't I read somewhere that now Hobarts are being made in China? Don't quote me, as I think it was a response from a layperson on a forum.... that I would be leary of if it's true. I hae yet to hear of quality staying good with being China made.

Chuck's picture
Chuck

If Wikipedia is to be believed: "Hobart is an international company with manufacturing plants in the United States, Australia, Benelux, Brazil, Canada, China, Columbia, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Puerto Rico and the United Kingdom."

msgenie516's picture
msgenie516

Hi,


I just ordered the a new N50 and I inquired directly with the Hobart company and they told me they are still made in Hillsboro, Ohio.  I was worried about the "China thing" also.  Fortunately, my Mom bought the N50 for me so I consider it an early Christmas present! 


I think this was just in time, though, as this morning as I was making bread, I noticed some black grease coming out of the shaft of my old KA mixer (the part where you attach the dough hook, beater, and whisk).  This scared me half to death and now I'm afraid to make any more bread with it.  I hope the N50 arrives soon.  Good luck with yours!  Genie


 

Leolady's picture
Leolady

N50s were still made in the US.  But I could be wrong.

highmtnpam's picture
highmtnpam

Several things that are made in China.  It depends on what you pay and from which company you are purchase it.  Quality control is quality control in any country. I wouldn't worry about where the mixer is made but rather the reputation of the company.


Pam

msgenie516's picture
msgenie516

Hi Pam,


Even though I can't seem to get rid of the reservations I have about Chinese goods, I must admit that the two Breville appliances I have, a one-cup coffeemaker and a toaster oven (both made in China) are wonderful and give me no trouble at all. Genie

Chuck's picture
Chuck

My experience too has been purchasing some wonderful things made in China: a digital scale with such fine resolution I can even measure yeast with it for $7; an easy to read and use digital thermometer for $3. (As you can see, my best experiences have been with devices that were not only manufactured but also designed in China.)


At the same time I too am quite leery of items that used to be made elsewhere but are now made in China. My experience too aligns with (a somewhat narrower version of:-) "I have yet to hear of quality staying good with being China made." If company executives suddenly move manufacturing to another country, it's obvious they've become very (overly?) cost-sensisitve, and as a result quality will suffer. Moving manufacturing to China often indicates the company is entering a period of turmoil during which quality will decline.

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys


At the same time I too am quite leery of items that used to be made elsewhere but are now made in China. My experience too aligns with (a somewhat narrower version of:-) "I have yet to hear of quality staying good with being China made." If company executives suddenly move manufacturing to another country, it's obvious they've become very (overly?) cost-sensisitve, and as a result quality will suffer. Moving manufacturing to China often indicates the company is entering a period of turmoil during which quality will decline.



That second paragraph is spot on with my experience and thoughts. Once cost cutting moves above quality, you will see a difference - and I have had that experience more than once.

highmtnpam's picture
highmtnpam

hate is the fact that you never know whether it is going to be a really good product "made in china" or a so so product "made in china" or a really poor product "made in china".  Pam