The Fresh Loaf

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Pain de mie - Problems when oiling

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ramat123's picture
ramat123

Pain de mie - Problems when oiling

Hi,


I've started using Pain de mie pans to bakes different recipes mostly Hamelman's whole wheat bread.


The problem is that I've read it is a must to oil the pan (lightly) but the oil gives a serious aftertaste to the loaf.


What do I do wrong?


There is some oil stick to the pan. Is there a way to remove it or the pan is lost?


Thanks a lot,


David

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

I use both regular bread pans and Pullman loaf pans, and have not experienced any oil/fat induced off tastes.  I use spray olive oil or lard. Perhaps it's the oil you use. I find, for example, that Canola oil is foul tasting.  It is my personal joke that Canola is re-purposed motor oil. :) I haven't tried margarine or vegetable shortening as I consider partially hydrogenated oils (trans-fats) to be unhealthy.


Please provide more details on what you use and how you use it.


//edit: Forgot this part:

Quote:
There is some oil stick to the pan. Is there a way to remove it or the pan is lost?
There should never be any noticeable oil residue after baking. If there is, use less oil when applying.  If this is some kind of old sticky residue, you'll need to wash with a good detergent. DO NOT use any abrasive. When clean, rinse well, then rinse with vinegar to remove any trace of detergent, and re-rinse with water. Let dry in a warm (~100F/40C) oven.

Just a few drops of oil, or a dab of lard on a paper towel is all you need. Wipe down the interior of the pan and the inner side of the lid. The oiliness should be only slightly perceptible to the touch.  After baking, do not wash the pan; simply wipe it clean with a soft, dry towel.


cheers,


gary

EvaB's picture
EvaB

plain old lard on her pans, and if no lard then bacon grease which may have left a pleasant taste of bacon on the bread, I don't remember.


But FINALLY someone agrees with me that canola is horrid! I cannot stand the smell of it, the taste of it, and don't care how great it is for the health (high low saturated fats count) I WON'T use it. It also gives me asthma attacks!


I quit using crisco oil because it suddenly was blended with canola (cheap oil) and won't use the hydrogenated solid shortening of any kind, which I suspect has canola in the blend anyway. Any oil which says vegetable oils, is likely to contain canola in the blend.


In Canada they have to list the ingredients on the lable, and from the most to the least and canola always seems to fall into the high up side of the list. So I use olive oil, or sunflower, or safflower oils, and peanut oil for deep frying. If you are using an olive oil, try to find a regular oil, not the extra virgin or virgin lables as they will be stronger in taste. And definitely avoid cold pressed if trying to get an oil that doesn't have a strong taste, as it is usually the first pressing, and has more sediment and taste than the later steam extracted or second pressings.

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

I, too, can't stand canola oil.  I once heated a pot of it for making doughnuts and it stank so much I wouldn't fry a single doughnut in it.  It tastes horrible.  Peanut oil is best for doughnuts, by the way, if you don't want to clog your arteries using Crisco, but I still use solid Crisco for greasing pans; it doesn't leave a taste, and tends to give better crusts on breads.

ramat123's picture
ramat123

Will try this out today!

Nickisafoodie's picture
Nickisafoodie

I use a light coat of crisco on my bread pans, it stays better than oil and I have not found any taste issues

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

I've found in the past that oil tends to pool in pans, so I always use solid Crisco for greasing.

ramat123's picture
ramat123

Not from USA :(

dscheidt's picture
dscheidt

Crisco is a brand of solid shortening.  A lard substitute, basically.  Traditionally, it was made of partially hydrogenated cottonseed oil.  Within the last few years, concerns about the health effects of trans-fatty acids led to the change of production methods.  It's pretty flavorless. 

KYHeirloomer's picture
KYHeirloomer

I suspect you may be using too heavy a coating of oil; that the oil you're using is slightly rancid to begin with; or that there's some oil residue left behind from the last use, and it's turned.


I use a light coating of spray olive oil on my pain de mie pan, and have not experienced a single problem that way. I've done a lot of experimenting with it, in fact, using various doughs. None of them stick. And none of them have an off-taste from the oil.


 Gary: Why do you recommend not washing baking pans between uses?


 

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

@ KYHeirloomer:


It  may not be an issue with newer non-stick coated loaf pans, but the older iron and aluminum pans require seasoning just as do cast iron and aluminum skillets. Once seasoned, the pan requires very little oil or lard to release cleanly. I've even forgot to oil my seasoned pans and not had the loaves stick, though that's tempting fate. When my brother-in-law's mother died, he gave me some of her bake-ware, including some iron 1lb. (4 cup capacity) loaf pans. She apparently threw them in the dishwasher after use, because it took a couple of bakes before they acted right. 


gary

EvaB's picture
EvaB

just thought I'd say that there is a conditioner for cast iron that you should be able to find in the BBQ section of a sporting goods store. I can't tell you the name of it, since I bought some, used it on my cast pan and haven't been able to find it since. I put it someplace safe,which it is, but now its safe from me as well!


I only resorted to the dishwasher to take a lot of the accumulated bruned on grease from the outside of the griddle I have, and regretted it, although it does take time to get it back to seasoned state, sometimes you just have to get rid of the dangerous stuff. The prefered method is to burn it off in a nice wood fire! But since it was the middle of winter, the snow was 3 feet deep and finding wood to burn was not an option, I washed it! It has only taken three months of using over the past 3 years to get the surface back to pre wash state, but I managed it.


 

KYHeirloomer's picture
KYHeirloomer

Thanks, Gary. I never gave any thought to aluminum needed to be cured like cast iron and carbon steel.


I don't use anything with a non-stick coating, so that's not an issue for me.


My pain de mie is relatively new. Got it from Kind Arthur, and it recommended washing after each use, so that's what I've been doing. I'll give your advice a try and see what happens.