The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

100% pain

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rxcsyrus's picture
rxcsyrus

100% pain

has anyone ever tried the recipes from the book 100% pain la saga du pain i borrowed it from the founder of the bakery i work at and there are some intereesting recipes in it for example le pain aux algues (slgae bread) the book is in french but however the magic of internet and bablefish has help me translate just thought i would put this out there and see if anyone has ever baker from this book yet. thank you 

Knead2quilt's picture
Knead2quilt

I'm sorry, but I can't figure out what you're talking about.  It would be helpful if you would use some punctuation so we know where the sentences begin and end.  What's "bablefish"?  Thanks.

suave's picture
suave

100% Pain is a book by Eric Kayser.  It is written in French and available in Europe and Canada.  It was once highly anticipated and sought after but has eventually been for the most part deemed a disappointment since it does not seem to accurately represent breads Kayser makes in his bakery.

alabubba's picture
alabubba
PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

A symbiotic creature that, when placed in one's ear, enables the understanding of any other language.  From Douglas Adams' Hitchhikers Guide to the Universe trilogy.


More practically, a website that provides translation services.  I first saw it as part of Altavista.  Apparently Yahoo owns it now.


Paul

rxcsyrus's picture
rxcsyrus

thanks for the link post dont really use punctuations i figure it could be figured out relatively easy i type as fast as my brain speaks. my fingers fumble around hopelessly cheers!!! 

EvaB's picture
EvaB

another child of the education system that doesn't think capitalization, punctuation and grammer is necessary. The problem with your explanation is, if your brain knew about the punctuation and the rest, it would type it in automatically and you would still be able to type as fast as your brain works My husband does 120 words a minute on a regular typewriter, who knows how fast he can go on a computer keyboard. I on the other hand don't type as fast as my brian works, because my fingers don't make the connections properly, so I am slower, but compensate by trying to do better at the sentence structure etc. Don't always make it, but at least people can see where my idea in one sentence is separate from another.


Geekdom is not an excuse for poor communications.

suave's picture
suave

I understood you perfectly.

amolitor's picture
amolitor

Has anyone ever tried the recipes from the book 100% pain: la saga du pain? I borrowed it from the founder of the bakery i work at and there are some intereesting recipes in it, for example le pain aux algues (slgae bread). The book is in french but however the magic of internet and bablefish has help me translate. Just thought i would put this out there and see if anyone has ever baker from this book yet. thank you.


See? It's not that hard to work out what the original post says. Nor is it very hard to stick in the punctuation in the first place ;)

amolitor's picture
amolitor

This sounds disgusting, just for the record!


 

bnom's picture
bnom

This is an interesting thread because it really highlights what seems like a generational clash around grammar.  I'm not making judgement on those who write without punctuation. But I do want to point out that many people will simply ignore posts that look like they were dashed out without any concern for readability. If a poster doesn't bother making himself understood, why should a reader bother trying to interpret the meaning and compose a response?

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

 Well said. Generational, and/or maybe some cultural/educational aspects also.


 I tried to read the original post. I didn't really understand. A few words into the second try, I wondered why bother. Sometimes, I think it's done just for the attention.


Interesting comments however.

amolitor's picture
amolitor

Punctuation is a pretty new idea. In fact, spaces, and written-out vowels are a pretty new idea, in the grand scheme of things. I'm a status-quo kind of guy, but I do recognize that it's non-productive to imagine that the way I do things, or the way most people do things, is either the best way or the way it's always been or really anything more than the way we happen to do things in this single instant of time.


 

rxcsyrus's picture
rxcsyrus

i am quite suprised as to how fast people jumped at the idea and pointed out a child with no regard for proper grammer and etc... come on people i posted about a book not about your personal attitudes about punctuation and any thing that might follow. i do like the smartie type comments though its good to get a little elbow in the ribs about the relatively new idea of punctuation and capitalization very cute. but lets talk baking please not grammer i am sorry if this is a sore spot for some of you  however this should not happen i am here to talk baking and share my baking not debate my language skills and use of punctuations. good times happy baking!!!

Knead2quilt's picture
Knead2quilt

I didn't mean to start such a debate.  I also come here to talk about bread and other baking; however, I am an "old dog" who grew up using punctuation and have no time to decipher peoples' posts.  It's an automatic for me to add it in (I also am a very fast typist) and I will not change my ways so rather than make enemies, I will simply not bother to read posts of those who can't be bothered to use any.  My posts will have punctuation.  (I also won't be baking with algae.  Yecch!)  Guess on the punctuation issue, we'll just have to agree to disagree and continue with our baking.  Good luck to you.

EvaB's picture
EvaB

which is capatalization and punctuation, you will probably be totally ignored by most posters.


And may I point out that people who don't capatalize the I when speaking of them selves in writing, are considered to have low self esteem.


If you can't be bothered to write well enough to be read by posters who like to help, then don't wonder when no one writes back.


its not a sore spot, and no matter how recent the punctuation bit is, its older than most of us on this forum I'm sure, since my grandmother who was born in 1885 learned it in school, as well as both her parents born in 1857, so the idea that its not really needed is out to lunch.


Yes one can get the gist of what you write, by why bother, when its annoying to the brain, and we have other posts to read, and lots of things to do, and while you may have some idea that its faster, its really not, and while thinking on this, how about that book you are asking about, does it have no capatalization, and no spelling, and grammer and punctuation, I highly doubt it, so why are you so set that its not needed?? Its your idea not the worlds idea!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

the thread couldn't have been continued in the same style instead of forcing punctuation as I had no trouble reading any of it or enjoying it sometimes flexibility is called for and like anything else there is an opportunity to just jump in and throw off the restraints and submerse oneself creatively into it until...  until...  it's tricky to leave out the dot dot dot stuff and conjuctions so I will just continue and loosen up some brain cells it was fun removing the accidental period now and then about the book is it also written in a relaxed manner i do believe recipes in written paragraphs would be more difficult without grammar more than likely leading to some interesting looking breads could be the source of the attact however


might be a fun idea baking with green goop got a suggestion where to find algae fresh out of a fish tank or are we talking riverbed or dried sea weed


Mini

csimmo64's picture
csimmo64

Hey, quit being internet bullies and trolling a forum about BREAD. Fagettaboudit

tanyclogwyn's picture
tanyclogwyn

What Keyser is probably referring to is what the Welsh call laverbread - a puree of seaweed (Wiki says same as nori in Japan) - the Welsh is Bara Llafwr.  It is eaten rolled in oatmeal and fried in bacon fat, but I have seen it tinned in France as algues celtiques. You can or could buy it from the fishmongers in Cardiff market.


This is my first post but I have often dropped in on TFL to see what serious people are doing - however I have never seen mentioned Jeffrey Steingarten's recipe for Pane Genzane - for my money one of the most enjoyable  accounts of how to bake a loaf, and one which is delicious (as baked in my Aga oven even if the soft dough gets there before me! (see It Must've been something I ate)).


BTW Kayser's bread is terrific

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

and I'm sure there is a variety of sea vegitables ...so crunchy and salty.  I do wonder about the motivation behind such recipes.  What do you suppose came first, algae bread or a salt shortage?  ...Substitutions that drove the ideas. 


Oido fish market link.  It's not far away from me. 


Crabs.  Fish.  Sea vegitables. 


Mini (still in Austria)

rxcsyrus's picture
rxcsyrus

hopefully i hope it is just plain genius for making that kind of bread. breaking out of the box and using something like that really shows what can really be done and i hope to find more interesting ideas like this as i continue baking. i found this as well http://www.crizfood.com/1344/wahaha-bakery/ interesting stuff!

EvaB's picture
EvaB

interesting link, not sure I would venture the charcole rolls but otherwise they looked very good. The tea loaf was pretty as well as probably good for one, and the dragon fruit rolls looked tasty!