The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Tartine Basic Country Loaf with raisins and pistachio

BerniePiel's picture
BerniePiel

Tartine Basic Country Loaf with raisins and pistachio

I have really become enamored of late with Chad Robertson's Tartine Bread, particularly his basic country loaf which is a combination of APF or BF and WWF.  I had to experiment with some raisins and pistachios that I had on hand.  The methodology was identical to Robertson's given in the text, same proportions, same times and so forth.  My only variation is that I use spring water, I mill local Oklahoma winter hard red wheatberries, and perhaps my method of folding the bread and the number of times that I fold versus the text.  I fold 4 or more times depending on what kind of structure I see developing; Chad states he folds three times every 25 minutes during the bulk rise.  I add one of two extra folds.  Also, I do not use all of the 50 g of water that he calls for when addiing the 20 g of salt after the inital 20 minute autolyse.  I usually just end up adding 25 g rather than the entire 50 because I feel it makes my dough to wet.


I have also discovered that his temps of water and air environment called for at various locations in the recipe should be adhered to.  He states using water at 80 degrees and he's right.  I tried using my ambient temp water at between 65 and 72 and the dough behaved differently.  The bulk rise and final rise temps should also be between 78 and 82 which is conducive to good yeast activity and providing a proper amount of time for the flavors to be created in the dough.


In this bread I added 1 1/2 cups of currants (a smaller dark raisin) and 1 1/2 cups of unsalted pistachio nuts, added at the first folding following  the 20 minutes autolyse or rrest.  It took several minutes to incorporate these two items evenly throughout the dough.  If you skimp here, the raisnins and nuts will be along the inside of the crust edge rather than scattered throughout the loaf.


Also, as the recipe states, it will make two loaves.  During this bake, I cooked the first loaf immediately ater the final rise.  The second loaf I allowed to ferment in the fridge for 12 hours just to see if  there was a difference in taste.  There is and its quite good.  But, even without that fermentation period, the bread was also very good.  But, the time in the fridge did improve the flavor.


Finally, I baked these two loaves in a round clay couche that I soaked before puttiing into the oven and I added  them as tthe oven was heating.  The oven was up to 360 degrees when I added the couche (normally I put my cooking vessel in when I fire up the oven, but I forgot this time.)  The clay vessel had been soaking in water for 15 minutes just prior to going in the oven to preheat befoe i added the boules.


I put the loaves in when my temp reached 515, put the top on and after 10 minutes, turned the oven down to 450.  After a total of 20 minutes had elapsed from the time I first put the dough in the clay pot, I took the lid off and baked for another 20 minutes at 450.  The crust becomes harder, good carmelization, and the interior crumb is chewy and flavorful.  I really, really like this bread.


Here are the pix:


 


from the oven couche


 


Comments

BerniePiel's picture
BerniePiel

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

The crumb looks so delicious with mix of fruit and nuts.  I was wondering what the country loaf would look like done in my Bell LaCloche.  I use a little different method when using my Bell LaCloche,  I have always been afraid to soak mine in water, I've read where this has caused some to break, especially when not pre-heated slowly as the oven pre-heats.  I have been able to get plenty of moisture/ovenspring from the bread without having to soak the bell and, letting it pre-heat sometimes for as long as an hour.


Sylvia 

BerniePiel's picture
BerniePiel

Sylvia, 


The baking vessel I used is a bell LaClouche, just as you described.  I need to meet a client soon so I'll post a photo of the clay that I'm referring to when I return this afternoon.  You are absolutely right about breaking it if not being careful to commence heat at the proper time.  I think if I had tried to put this in the oven at a temp higher than 390 it would be quite risky and anything from 400 to 425 would be a guarantee of breakage.  My oven runs a little cool and had not been on but 5 minutes when I put it in the oven fully soaked for an hour.  I really wonder whether there is any steam in the bell after letting it heat to 515 plus an extra 20 minutes before putting in the dough.  I think the steam would have been baked out by the time I added the dough.  A better test would have been to put the dough in a cold LaClouche, properly soaked, and in a cold oven.  I will try that later in the week.  I don't use the clay pots to cook bread very often, I prefer to use the cast iron dutch ovens and I've always had great success with them.  Although I have a batard shaped clay baking pot that makes wonderful rye loaves soaked and put in a cold oven.  But, you are quite correct that clay will break if exposed  to intense temp extremes if the clay is soaked. 


Thank you for your comment about the bread.  This really is a delicious loaf.  I have a mix of candied fruit that I bought from KA and I think I'm going to try a cupful of this mix and perhaps sweeten the dough w/ a half cup of honey just to see what happens.  I know the dough will darken quicker due to the honey, but that's where I might leave the lid on the clouche until all but 5 to 7 min from finish time.  I will be sure to post the results, Sylvia.


Bernie


 


 


 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I also order KA candied fruit and it is delicious, I never ordered anything from them I wasn't very pleased with, especially the freshness.  Sounds like a lot of honey for your next bake, IMHO...you will also enjoy the sweetness added from the fruit itself.  Happy Baking and I enjoy your posts.


Sylvia

BerniePiel's picture
BerniePiel

is a wonderful product.  I don't think I've ever bought somethiing from there that I wasn't 100% happy with.


Yes, I believe you are right about the added honey.   I think maybe I should try this first with just the fruit, and leave out the honey, and see how it tastes.  At least, I don't think the dough would be as prone to burn.  I was going to use the fruit for Pannetone, an Italian fruit filled bread traditionally made during the Christmas season.  I haven't really looked for a recipe yet as I hadn't planned on making it till after Thanksgiving.  But, I''m really drawn to experimenting with this fruit and the basic loaf, especially after the currants and pistachios.  It had a very festive air about it--as well as being delicious.


Plus, I think there are a lot of inquisitive types on TFL.  At least they seem to be from all of the postings I've read.  David is one, TxFarmer, MeBake, Andy, you, Shiao Ping, Wally, and way many more seem to enjoy taking their ingredients to a new taste level which  I think is just great because it is like watching the "process" of invention, or even Art.  But, because I still consider myself a novice, I must reign myself in to learn the "tried and true" limits before I can understand what is happening in the new changes I might bring to the table--like currants and pistachio or candied fruit and chopped pecans.........So much baking, so little time {:-)


Bernie

wally's picture
wally

I love pistachios and currants, but have never thought of mixing them together in a bread dough.  But your results looking mouth-watering!  Thanks for sharing.


Larry

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

I made the basic country loaf from that book this weekend, came out great. Inredible open crumb - which is not surprising since the dough is very wet, wetter than my already very wet baguette dough! I will post about it later next week. I am super impressed by how moise and sweet the crumb is, just like he promised in the book.

BerniePiel's picture
BerniePiel

Sylvia, 


This is the vessel I used to cook the last two Tartine Country Loaves (raisins and pistachios).  I normally do not soak it, but this time I did.  I did not notice much difference between soaking and not soaking.


Thanks, Larry, I liked this combination on many levels: taste, helped me use up some extra ingredients to make way for shelf space; I can use this as a Christmas bread either Christmas morning or some other festive occasion; and, finally, taste once again; simplicity, what could be easier.


TxFarmer, you are right about the dough being wet.  Next time only try 25 g of the extra water added w/ the 20 g of salt.  It makes a vast difference in the dough.


Thanks to all of you, for your wonderful comments and help.


Bernie Piel


SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I love my LaCloche too!  I just noticed this...thought you might be interested.  If you can catch the photo 'on the right of the front page, in 'recipes you can also find on TFL' 'Country Sourdough', click on it or just type in search Chad Robertson's Country Sourdough...Shiao Ping, has also has lovely version with full photos/ recipe written out that she baked before his book was published, she discribes how she watched him bake his bread and how wonderful it taste.


Added: " Also on TFL" on the right the photos come up at random, but do not show when you are on the front page of TFL.


 


Sylvia

BerniePiel's picture
BerniePiel

Sylvia,


Yes, I saw this after I published my first entry about the Tartine book.  I wasn't aware that anyone had written about it.  Her posting, as always, was quite good and very thorough.


Sylvia, I'm not sure I understand what you mean by the following:  Added: " Also on TFL" on the right the photos come up at random, but do not show when you are on the front page of TFL.


Did I miss part of your transmission?


Bernie

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Sorry for the confusion, Bernie,  I was trying to explain about the photos that are shown to the right, top of the screen, under the heading, Also On The Freshloaf.  They change when you go to another page and, Shiao-Pings photo is there under 'Country Sourdough' and clicking on it takes you to her post.   I had forgotten about her post and, wasn't aware if you had seen it.   


Sylvia

BerniePiel's picture
BerniePiel

Yes, I saw her posting, and, as usual, it was a verbal treat.


Bernie