The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Glazing help-Sourdough Bread

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anawim_farm's picture
anawim_farm

Glazing help-Sourdough Bread

When making sourdough bread do you use a glazing?  When I bake traditional sour dough the crust is buff colored and matt.  Has anyone been to the Boudin site and seen the bread?  How is this done, perhaps egg yolk, I seen the images of different glazes and the Boudin bread almost looks like it is glazed with egg yolk.

Val's picture
Val

I've read that a baking soda and water glaze may work. Egg wash may burn at 450.

mij.mac's picture
mij.mac

First off the bread should look the way you want it to look, don't worry about what others do. A simple trick if you want shine is as soon as the bread is done spay it with water. But really it's all about what it tastes like. I shy away from obsessing about appearance. Yes it's nice when it looks good but don't worry about it. 'How does it taste' is the biggy. Another tip is flour the top using a sieve. Covers a multitude of sins and is impressive. lol.
mac

anawim_farm's picture
anawim_farm

 

Thanks for the advice, Actually I agree the taste is what's most important. I'm just curious and always looking for different techniques. Mainly to keep things different, I try different way's of baking the same types of bread to see if I like the outcome. I have a few standards that work well but love to try something new. I'll have to try the water after baking, I tried it pre bake and it kind of eliminated my slashes.....oops

 Joe

TRK's picture
TRK

If you steam the oven, you may find you don't need a glaze. I used to tell people it didn't matter very much whether you steamed or not in a home oven. The I decided to do a little experiment. Here are the results:

 

 

The bread on the left was steamed for the first five minutes, the bread on the right from the same recipe, mixed at the same time, baked in the same oven at the same temp, minus the steam (and maybe 20 minutes later, so it had a little longer to proof).  I did a modification of what Peter Reinhart recommends in BBA, preheating the oven and a stone for an hour, preheating a cast iron pan on the bottom of the oven for about 20 minutes before baking.  Then pouring 1 cup of boiling water into that pan just before loading the bread.  I take the pan out after 5 minutes because I feel that the whole cup of water doesn't evaporate quickly enough and ends steaming the bread too long.  Is that the glazed look you are looking for?

 

Tim 

mij.mac's picture
mij.mac

Hi Tim, If you hadn't told me anything about these two I'd have said the two on the right had been allowed to dry out before going in the oven, and or slightly over proofed. Might this be a contributing factor? I baked last night but as I'm still pretty busy with one thing or another got my timing wrong, the loaves had to sit out on the counter for half an hour before going in the oven and came out looking not that different to yours. Interestingly enough I threw a bit of film over the two pan loaves and they looked better. Do you have an electric oven?

mac

TRK's picture
TRK

Mac,

 

I've been busy, so haven't checked in recently.  I left the second set in the couche while I baked the first (left) ones, so I don't think they dried any more than the other.  As far as overproofed, it is a possibility, but I don't think I baked the first loaves more than 15 minutes, so the difference should have been minor.  I am pretty convinced the shiny crust is a result of steaming.  

 

It was a gas oven.

 

Tim