The Fresh Loaf

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Quiche with the Crust That Won't Quit

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evth's picture
evth

Quiche with the Crust That Won't Quit


 



 


Yes, this is one adaptable pastry dough: genesis - empanadas, second form -  apple pie,  fin - quiche. I have worked this modified version of Cafe Azul's Pastry Dough (see my apple pie blog for the recipe) into so many baked goods. Versatility is the key to a good recipe in my baking heart. It is no wonder that this pastry dough and I were just meant to be.

Since this is a high-yield dough (it is enough for two double crust pies or singles), you can freeze what you don't use. After making the apple pie, I froze two mounds of dough that were left over. The night before I was ready to make the quiche, I thawed the mounds in the fridge and in the morning was able to quickly roll them out for my tart pans with relative ease. I sing praises to thee, my dough of wonder!

As for the quiche, it is a fairly simple recipe. Here is my own adapted set of instructions for the filling, but you can make it your own according to what you have on hand. For example, you can include bacon or ham, drained and chopped cooked spinach, sauteed peppers or onions, etc. Don't get carried away, though. Less is more, in my book.

1) Saute a package of sliced mushrooms (I use baby portabellos)
2) Chop a handful of green onions (3 or so stalks) 
3) 1/2 cup of shredded cheese - use more or less depending upon your fondness for fromage (I use Gruyere) 

For the custard, I like to use Michael Ruhlman's ratio of 3 eggs, 1/2 cup of cream and 1 cup of milk per tart. In a mixing bowl, whisk these together until smooth, salt and pepper to taste, and add a small grating of nutmeg.

After you roll out your dough, arrange the dough in a shallow tart pan. Scatter onto the crust the green onions, cheese and half of the mushrooms. Pour in half the custard, and layer the last of the mushrooms and green onions on top. Then add the rest of the custard, filling the pan up to about 3/4. Then sprinkle on the rest of the cheese. Carefully, place the pan on a baking sheet, and bake in a preheated oven of 400°F for 45-60 minutes, depending on your oven's temperature. When I made my quiche I forgot to use my trusty baking stone, and so the bottom crust came out a bit soft. I recommend that if you've got a stone, place it under your tart pan and baking sheet to ensure a crispy bottom crust. A golden and puffy quiche means that it's finished baking.



Voila!

evth

Comments

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

I have gained 2 lbs just by looking at it :)


 

evth's picture
evth

Merci, AnnaInMd. 

lief's picture
lief

This sounds awesome!  I've never made a quiche but it is on my list of things I would like to try my hand at.  Could this be done in a standard size baking pan (which is typically much deeper), and if so, what size would be appropriate for the amount of custard in this recipe?

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

what size to use ?  I have an 8 inch and 10 inch quiche plate.

evth's picture
evth

Much appreciated, lief! Although I have not baked this quiche in a standard sized baking pan (e.g. 13" x 9") I can't see why not. I suggest lining the bottom of the pan in parchment paper before you lay down the crust. Pie pans are always good and cake pans will work too. As for the custard, I would probably make a ratio of 6 eggs, 2 cups of milk and 1 cup of cream per 13" x 9" pan. This will create more custard height.  Tall is good - more dramatic! Great quiche flavors will surely abound within those tall walls of crust. Please check out Michael Ruhlman's ratio story on NPR. It's an excellent piece and has certainly liberated many of us recipe fiends in the kitchen. He uses molds for his quiche and suggests cake pans too. Next time I will try baking the quiche a la Ruhlman in a cake pan and parbaking the crust before pouring in the custard filling as the chef suggests.


http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=107019060

AnnaInMD, try using your 8" quiche pan for the 3 egg ratio.

FYI: I used 11" x 7" and 14" x 5" loose bottom tart pans.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

will try this weekend, need to sneak in the cream, away from hubby's eagle eye and "fat-free everything" mentality, hehe

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

i tried your quiche today and it turned out flat as a pancake. The custard didnt custard. Shouldn't there be more ingredients to make it thicken into a custard ?


(First time I tried a quiche, it tastes yummy but even the crust stayed kinda soggy, albeit prebaked a bit.


 


Anna

evth's picture
evth

What size pan did you use? Height of pan? Yes, thinking also that maybe your quiche needed more custard filling, i.e. ratio of 6 eggs, 2 cups milk & 1 cup cream. I baked the quiche in the lower rack and it was 3/4 full of filling. Makes sense to par bake the crust. Don't know why the crust went soggy though. How's your oven temp? Did the quiche puff up nice and high in the oven? The quiche is supposed to puff up in the oven but it does deflate after being removed out of the oven.