The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

First results for No-Knead bread.

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RFMonaco's picture
February 9, 2007 - 10:10pm -- RFMonaco

I am really impressed with this technique! The best tasting loaf I ever made. I used an 8 qt. cast iron Dutch oven at 450 deg. for 30 min. then removed lid and continued for 30 more min. Used the recipe listed on this fabulous site. 6 inch high with superb crackly crust and very tasty crumb. Glad the crumb didn't have the huge holes in it I usually see in other pics of this variety. I want something I can put butter on!

I will make another tomorrow....and another....and another....and another...

Comments

ehanner's picture
Submitted by ehanner on

Glad to hear you liked the bread. I think that as more people try this method we will hear about troubles with finding a suitable vessel to cook in. I have an old dutch oven that I don't want to ruin the seasoning in. How does the high heat leave the cast iron?

 

RFMonaco's picture
Submitted by RFMonaco on

Hello, this was a new Dutch oven, an 8 qt. KingKooker I got from Bass Pro camping dept. online for $29.99 here:

http://www.basspro.com/servlet/catalog.TextId?hvarTextId=45502&hvarTarget=search&cmCat=SearchResults

Not the best but good enough. Didn't say if it was pre-seasoned so I went thru that routine with a burn-in over my gas grill then seasoned it with peanut oil. After the bread was done there was no evidence of any stress to the oven, still somewhat oily and the bread slipped right out. I would have preferred a Lodge model but hard to locate a 5" deep oven with the preferred dimensions. Can't understand why they don't come deeper. I think your oven will do just fine. Post your results and good luck.

ehanner's picture
Submitted by ehanner on

I keep reading about the clay pot cookers failing and the Le Creuset cast iron pots cracking and knobs cracking at 500 degrees. I have baked the no knead formula on my stone without a cover and it turns out fine but I'm curious about the crust using the pot. My old cast iron is over 100 years old and I use it frequently for braising and soups as did my great grandmother. Maybe I'll break down and buy a cast iron chicken fryer from Lodge. I think that will do the job.

RFMonaco's picture
Submitted by RFMonaco on

Your right about the clay pots...I use to throw and fire clay and porcelain and if there was a small air bubble hidden anywhere you could count on it cracking under heat eventually. I won't trust my La Cloche to this procedure.

auzziewog's picture
Submitted by auzziewog on

yes wonderful - I use one cup of wholemeal ( wholewheat) flour and 2 cups plain, use 1 3/4 cup of warm water and let it bubble away for 20 hours and then fold it over twice like I would make puff pastry and rest and shape and voila into the oven in a pyrex pan with a lid and brilliant - I have now made my 8th loaf and am still very impressed - I read some recipes that put oil in with the waer and I have added 1 tablespoon of olive oil and then mix it with nice results also -

 

 

 

 

 

RFMonaco's picture
Submitted by RFMonaco on

Thanks for that reply..good info. What kind and dimensions of pyrex pan did you use? I am looking for one with decent depth now.

auzziewog's picture
Submitted by auzziewog on

I make two portions at one time - One pyrex dish is oblong 32 cms long 22 cms width and 15 cms high = the other I use is a round Pyrex dish 22 cms across and 12 cms high - both have tigh fitting lids - I put them in the oven @ 450F for 1/2 hour and then put the dough in as per recipe - there is more "air" room in the oblong dish then the round one after I have put the dough in and the bread in the oblong one is higher then the round one somewhow I take the lid off ater 30 minutees and bake for 20 minutes I have also brushed melted butter on after teh lid comes off and the crust is nice and crunchy and yummy

 

L_M's picture
Submitted by L_M on

This idea has been mentioned here before and it really does work - you can put the dough in a cold pot, pyrex, or whatever...even in a cold oven. The results are almost exactly the same as in one that has been preheated but without the worry of burning yourself. You need to use parchment paper or some other way to make sure it doesn't stick and also to cut down slightly on the proofing time in order to compensate for the extra time it needs to heat up. You can even do away with the closed vessel idea if you put some boiling water in the oven because the dough has extra time to expand without the crust setting from the high heat. I know this goes against everything we have learned about hot ovens and oven spring, but it is much easier and I am not confined to the shape of the pot. I haven't tried baking on a cold baking stone yet because it might take too long to heat up so I just use a baking sheet. Good luck!

L_M