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dlx mixer and sour dough starters

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bustamove's picture
bustamove

dlx mixer and sour dough starters



hi new to the forum, and just purchased a dlx mixer....I only make natually leavened, sour dough breads that tend to have a medium to high hydration...and am use to using a 6 quart kitchen aid... is anyone familiar with the conversion from a ka to a dlx...when using  the ka - my dough is sticky and clinging to the walls and as it mixes and develops comes clean into a mass - i mixed yesterday and needed almost 12 minutes of mixing time using the roller and scraper to get the same gluten development i get with the KA in 7min.  i am going to try the bread hook today... 
the manual says only mix on level one...any thoughts - with the Ka i mixed at 3 one above what they recommend
is the bread hook good for smaller amounts...i do everything by weight  - about 3  3/4 lb of material 
thanks
michael

SteveB's picture
SteveB

Michael,

I made the migration from a 6 qt. KitchenAid to the DLX a number of years ago.  Like any change in equipment, it takes a short while to identify and work with the idiosyncrasies of a new mixer.  I have found that for smaller quantities of dough (~3 lbs.), the DLX works best with the roller/scraper.  I first add all the water to the bowl.  With the mixer speed set on the first level, I then slowly add about 3/4 of the flour.  At this point the dough is very loose, almost resembling a poolish in nature.  I let the dough continue to mix until I can see definite signs of gluten development, at which point I add the rest of the flour and mix until I obtain a smooth dough. 

Alternately, one can add all the flour at once, mix until just incorporated, and then stop the mixer for an autolyse period of 20-30 minutes.  After the autolyse, mixing is continued to provide a smooth dough. 

It is during this second mix period that I add my levain.  It should be noted that I keep my levain at around 50% hydration, so that most of the water in the overall formula is added to the bowl during the initial mixing of the dough.  If a 100% hydration levain is being used, it would probably all have to be added at the beginning of the mix to provide enough water for proper gluten development.       

bustamove's picture
bustamove

Thanks Steve,

 How long are you mixing for if you do not do the autolyse?

 Do you think that this mixer favors a particular kind of dough?

my levain  is roughly a 50/50 water / flour...

 I use 1 lb of this  1.75 lb of giostos ultimate performer, a tablespoon of sea salt and just shy of a 1lb of water - 

  this afternoon i tried to  use the dough hook (and i am adding everything at once) and  after the initial gathering  the dough would only occasionally move through the arm of the dough hook.  Basically, it  just sat as a mass clinging to the arm...the only part that seemed to be mixing was the small amount touching the bottom of the arm and the bowl.

After 6 minutes, I gave up and put the roller on ... it seemed to work for  a short while - a nice "donut" of dough with the roller spinning and pushing the dough between itself and the wall of the bowl but then it stopped - the roller stopped spinning and the dough just became a mass with only the smallest amount at the bottom of the roller seeming to mix

 i moved the arm, tried different speeds... after 14 minutes (total) ...  i had  warmed the dough - it had gone up over 10 degrees from the friction..and still had not reached that  smooth dough state...

 

I really don't want to get into the autolyse thing... 

going to try a few more times before i give up.

 

thank

 

michael 

 

 

SteveB's picture
SteveB

Michael,

Depending on the dough, without an autolyse, I can mix anywhere from between 6 to 12 minutes. 

Although your final dough hydration seems about right (about 67% by my calculation), as you know different brands and types of flour have different water absorbing capacities.  I'm not familiar with the specific flour you are using but it may be that you need to add a bit more water.  When the dough is mixing properly in the DLX, you get that "donut" shape you spoke about.  The fact that the "donut" shape formed then disappeared indicates to me that the dough was still in the process of absorbing the water.  Enough water should be added so that the "donut" shape just begins to form and then stays formed.  I've found that the DLX is not very efficient at mixing dry doughs.  But, then again, dry doughs don't make very good bread.  :) 

bustamove's picture
bustamove

thanks again Steve for the info... 
when i saw the "donut" shape happen, i knew that this is what the mixer had to be about...
i will try a bit more water...
best
michael