The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

What's the most unusual bread you've every had, baked or tasted?

cookingwithdenay's picture
cookingwithdenay

What's the most unusual bread you've every had, baked or tasted?

What is the most unusual baked good you have ever seen or tasted? I recently had a hot-pepper cheese bread served at a winery in NC. Just wondering... Can't wait to see what turns up! Thanks

bnom's picture
bnom

Great question.  Last year I was in rural South Africa (Cedarberg area) and was served an amazingly delicious bread that was prepared by a Bushman directly in the coals of an outdoor fire.  I wish I knew more because i would love to replicate it.  Perhaps someone on TFL has some knowledge of it??   

cookingwithdenay's picture
cookingwithdenay

That sounds heavenly! I am a try carb addict and bread is my weakness. Can you share more about the texture and taste of the bread? Did you take photos?

bnom's picture
bnom

It was a white bread and basically pull apart rolls.  But it's really hard to describe why they were so good but I've eaten a lot of bread and they really were exceptional!

yozzause's picture
yozzause

Bushmen bread


Sounds a lot like the Aussie damper that our bush travellers enjoy either baked in the fire coals or in a camp oven. i will dig up a recipe


Still looking for a recipe but do try googling Malcolm douglas damper some very good clips on damper making from a true aussie bushman

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Well, I would have to say it's injeera (not sure of the spelling) - Ethiopian bread.   I had it only three times in my life, and loved the unusual texture and almost "funky" taste


 


I know that for this crowd of expert bakers it's not even considered exotic, but...  trying it for the first time was an unforgettable experience

cookingwithdenay's picture
cookingwithdenay

Oh yes, I lived in MI where there was a fairly big Ethopian population and one of my favorite restaurants was "The Blue Nile." The food was spectacular and the bread was served with the meal and used to pick up the lentils, meat and vegetables. The dining experience always leaves me breathless. The food is so flavorful! I have been told it is impossible to recreate the injera here in the states since it is the water that gives it that "funky" taste. I have found that substituting club soda however for the water in the recipe works well and it is most authentic.

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Wow, so you make injera!  I have a recipe, ir I remember correctly it called forf teff flour and a few days of fermentation at room temperature.    If I ever attempt to make it, I'll remember the club soda tip


if you have a tried and true recipe handy, I'd love to have it (although I doubt I'll be able to make it in the near future)

cookingwithdenay's picture
cookingwithdenay

This recipe serves 6-8. These are the flat, airy slightly fermented round breads that are an indispensable accompaniment to Ethiopian wats. Usually made with teff, a member of the millet family, they are light in color, slightly spongy in tiexture and pliable enough to drape over the edge of a platter.


4 cups self-rising flour


1 cup whole wheat flour


1 teaspoon baking powder


2 cups club soda


Comgine flours and baking powder in a bowl


Add club soda plus about 4 cups water.


Mix into a smooth, fairly thin batter


Heat a large, non-stick skillet


Add a drop of water which should bounce on the pan surface (indicating it is hot)


Pour just enough batter to cover the bottom of the skillet


Swirl quickly so the entire bottom is coated and set back on the heat


When the moisture has evaporated and small holes appear on the surface, remove the injera. (Sides will also begin to curl a bit)


The cooking time is unpredictable so don't over cook.


Stack the injera one on top of the other as you cook them, covering with a clean linen cloth to prevent drying. Serve immediately.


 

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Thanks so much!  Wonderful!


I am definintely saving this and will make it whenever I have the opportunity....

bnom's picture
bnom

It is unforgettable...especially so for the friend who thought it was a folded napkin and tried wiping his face with it!

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

:-)   PRICELESS!!!!

Franko's picture
Franko

North American native Bannock deep fried in bear fat with salmon berry confit. Bloody good!

alabubba's picture
alabubba

Mesquite bean bread, As a young boy growing up in AZ. I had a meal of Rattlesnake and Mesquite bean bread, with cactus jelly. I remember the bread being bitter/sour alkaloid taste.  I also remember the company that I was with.


Also ate lots of Fry bread, YUM!

foodslut's picture
foodslut

....are cool and interesting:  deep ruby colour, super-strong tannic taste, great w/strong cheeses and charcuterie.  Folks look at it funny, but they love it with the right, strong topping.  The "flour" is actually dried grape skins ground up into powder available here.

yozzause's picture
yozzause

i finaly found the Damper dough and it goes like this


3 cups s/r flour


2 teaspoons salt


3 tablespoons of butter


1/2 a cup of milk and 1/2 cup water


mix dry ingediants together,  rub in the butter to fine bread crunb consistancy, make a well in the centre and start adding the liquid, mix with a knife until dough is formed and leaving the sides of the bowl tip out and lightly kneed to form a round about 6 inches diametet. Bake in hot oven or in the hot ash of the camp fire for about 30 minutes ,best eaten the day baked. google malcom douglas bush damper to see a big one being made on u tube


regards yozza 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Mini

yozzause's picture
yozzause

no yeast mini, using self raising flour in this one of course this can be made a little more exciting by adding a few of your favourites ,chesse herbs , dry fruit etc. did you see malcolm douglas 's damper that he made with a group of indigenous kids must have used nearly 5kgs of flour and baked it in the hot ash and sand!


regards yozza

EvaB's picture
EvaB

which is the Canadian version of damper, its basically hardtack, but because its not rolled out thin its softer. If left for a day or so it becomes harder and harder.


We cooked this when supplies were running low, and had no baking powder or soda and cream of tarter for making biscuits, no yeast for bread. My brother usually cooked it in a cast skillet on top of the stove. When he was camping, he used a camp stove or a grate over the coals to bake it in the skillet. The trick is to judge when it needs turning to bake the other side, and to turn it without it falling apart, not the easiest thing from my memories of it. A lot of blue air while trying to do it!


In purist terms it would be a basic bread, flour water and salt, no milk, and no sugar, you can make it thinner with more water and bake it more like a cracker, or even thick enough to hold on a stick (wrapped like a corn dog on the stick) and held over the coals to bake. Its credited to Colonel Bannock of the British army when campaigning in Canada. Don't know how true that is but that's the story.


By the way I know that the military title is misspelled but for the life of me can't spell it right.

bnom's picture
bnom

Hey thanks for posting this.  The recipe is different from the yeast one that is featured on the link Eric posted.  The video was interesting. I was told the Bushmen cook the bread directly in the coals -- and that's what Malcolm did with his "damper" bread (never heard of damper before). You'd think it would get all ashy, but I suppose it just brushes off.  I do a lot of camping and I'd love to bake bread directly in the coals.  Anyone on TFL ever try that?

ehanner's picture
ehanner

This fellow is fun to watch. It took a bit to find the right video. You have to admire the simplicity of his methods. Have a watch.


Eric

yozzause's picture
yozzause

Thanks for that Eric I should have done the drill down for everyone.


I have just been watching the midday news  and it is reported that Malcolm Douglas has been killed in a vehicle accident on his crocodile farm in Broome today! more details will be made available as they come to hand.


YOZZA

bnom's picture
bnom

How sad.  Sounds like he was killed in a freak accident.  I was unaware of him until Eric posted his video yesterday, but he seemed like a very interesting fellow. 


Rest in peace Malcolm.

yozzause's picture
yozzause

It appears that Malcolm was pinned by his own 4 wheel drive against a tree and was discovered early in the morning, police say they dont believe there are any suspicious circumstances. Malcolm was the original crocodile hunter and laterly conservationist he has made 50 documentry films . He was strongly opposing the governments site of the onshore gas hub at James Price Point north of Broome and will be sorely missed in that up and coming battle. We do of course still have his films to remember him by and well worth a look see. 


Yozza  

The Yakima Kid's picture
The Yakima Kid

Are you referring to the Blue Nile in downtown Ann Arbor? There was another Ethiopian restaurant that I really liked in the Ann Arbor area, one that I believe was on Michigan Avenue between Ypsi and Ann Arbor. I don't know if it is still around. I thought it was both better and more affordable than the Blue Nile - it was very small and run by a very nice woman.

I think the best I've found that I know is still in business is the Axum in SF. There used to be an excellent one in the Santa Clara/Sunnyvale area but they sold up and went home after the Eritrean war ended.

The Yakima Kid's picture
The Yakima Kid

The name of the place on Michigan Avenue is/was The Red Sea. It's in the strip mall adjacent to the Dairy Queen.