The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Lowtide Sourdough

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Lowtide Sourdough

 


It was time to clear out some of the flotsam and jetsam of flour remnants.  It was  also time to unwind after several weeks of "disciplined" baking. 


So, into the dough went WW bread flour, WW turkey red flour, whole white wheat flour, pumpernickel  rye, medium rye (I think), molasses and caraway seeds.  And to top it off I dug out the ancient bottle of Jaegermeister that has been lurking in the dark depths of my freezer for more years than I can remember and threw in a shot of that as well.  I seem to have reached a point in my life where actually drinking the stuff has really lost its appeal.  But, the first time I combined German breadspice and molasses in my rye bread I noticed that the sweet, herbal flavor was very similar to the black stuff in the green bottle... and also Ricola cough drops now that I think about it.  So it was only a matter of time before it ended up in the bread.  The Jaegermeister, not the cough drops.


So I doubled the recipe, threw it all together and made a big, ol' loaf of this:



 


 And it actually turned out really tasty.


To follow-up on a previous post:  Sometimes it really is enough just to show up.


These two loaves went to the fair.  Embarassingly underproofed and really dense.  But they won their classes.  I'm pretty sure they were the only breads in their classes!!  Because I couldn't find a second place entry in either one.  There is no shame in cherry-picking!!



And more bagels!  This time with almost all KA whole white wheat flour to lighten things up a bit.  I was also able to locate the one jar of barley malt syrup in the area and make it mine.  Then underestimated the oven-spring and all the holes closed up!  But oh, what a difference in flavor



Marcus

Comments

Postal Grunt's picture
Postal Grunt

I know that the judges from the county 4-H organization were really pleased to see my entries in the bread competition at our county fair. First of all, because I had to drive across the county to get there and they hadn't seen that in a while. Second, because they hadn't seen any entries from a man for the different classes. Obviously, I was a novelty. All the judges encouraged me to enter next year and one told me to investigate food preservation as well.


I hope my entries motivated someone to learn the bread baking craft and become my competition next year. They should bring their "A" game bread with them next year because I'm going for "Best in Category" next time around.

wassisname's picture
wassisname

One of the divisions I entered, hoping that it would be under-represented, was "Men Only."  But I think bread in general was pretty scarce.  Lots of sweets, not much bread.  Even I was hesistant to put that much work into bread that I assumed would mostly end up getting tossed.  But I was pleasantly surprised to find out that after the judging (and maybe a little nibbling by the fair volunteer staff) the baked goods get donated to a local soup kitchen.  I like that idea.  It gives me a little more of a sense of purpose.  Although, now I'm more worried about disappointing those folks than I am about the judges!

EvaB's picture
EvaB

I did that one year and actually won a couple of ribbons, not for bread but for tarts, and cookies. My daughter won for best packed school lunch! And the enteries were a legion in that catagory! So she felt like she had won a million rather than the 2 dollars that was the prize.


Haven't entered for years though, as I was too ill to try, but am feeling better, and maybe next year I will be more experienced and be able to enter the bread catagories, as well as the tarts!

wassisname's picture
wassisname

School lunch packing, great category!  I wish we had that.  My daughter loves entering her handiwork and coming home with all sorts of ribbons.  The fair here is great about making sure the kids get at least an Honorable Mention ribbon.

EvaB's picture
EvaB

must wait for fair day with great anxiety, probably the best soup kitchen day of the year.


I think that men make wonderful bread, my brother was a fabulous bread baker, and always said I did better pies and cakes than he did. I can't knead bread well enough to make really great bread, but even with his right arm disabled to a great degree (about 25% of his pre accident use) he could turn out fabulous loaves. Mine is ok, but nothing to write home about. But then again that is why I'm here trying to improve my bread.


She also entered several other categories and won in three of them, so came home with great ribbons, and about 10 dollars in prize money. The fair is always a fun place to visit, and I might manage it next year, but have been too ill to do it, as there is really no place to sit and I have difficulty walking for any length of time. And its usually really hot, or really wet and muddy, both not great for people who have difficulties breathing (asthma) and walking (back injury at 6 years old) not to mention the crowds who are mostly rude around here. Pushy and snappy.