The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Restarting a new Starter

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jpolchowski's picture
jpolchowski

Restarting a new Starter

I recently moved and so I had to start a new sourdough starter. I like using organic grapes. After only a couple days I was having some pretty crazy activity, so I jumped the gun, discarded the grapes, and fed the starter in preparation to bake the next day. Unfortunately since then it has had pretty much no activity.


I was wondering if I can give the starter a kick by adding some more grapes and giving it the proper time, or if I should just discard it and start fresh and give it the time it needs?


Thanks.

Ford's picture
Ford

I would say things are going normally.


For more information go to: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/233.  Also to: http://www.sourdoughhome.com/starterprimer.html.


Debra Wink worked on the pineapple juice starter method.  The pineapple juice is only to ajdust the pH (acidity) of the starter so that the bacteria and yeast in the flour have a comfortable environment in which to grow and thus give the starter a fast track.


Ford


 


PS:  The grapes do nothing to get the starter going.  You may get activity, but the yeast on the grapes will die out when the real sourdough get going and the starter become acidic.

matilda's picture
matilda

From Illinois to Connecticut, by car. Yes, I did. I had a cooler filled with ice just for my two jars... Using rye flour and water to start my starter, I found useful to refresh it with rye flour, in case of a lack of activity during the first week. Not sure with grapes though, never tried.


Matilda


 


http://sickofood.blogspot.com/

jpolchowski's picture
jpolchowski

Thanks for the responses. It is no longer forming a layer of alcohol on the top since discarding it on the second day but it is still making a small layer of bubbles, but not a ton. It certainly smells however so I guess that is a good sign that it is souring. Just needs some more time I think.