The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Baking Bread above 3000 Feet above Sea Level

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baker daniel's picture
baker daniel

Baking Bread above 3000 Feet above Sea Level

I am having a problem.  I live 3000 feet above sea level.  I have been baking sourdough bread with a starter that is well over 100 years old.  The flavor of my sourdough bread is awesome, but the texture of the actual bread (inside) is too dense and finely textured.  I have tried everything to create more gas inside the bread, but to no avail.  What am I doing wrong?  If my altitude is too high, how do I compensate?  Suggestions are welcome!

MichaelH's picture
MichaelH

I don't think that altitude is your problem; I live at 6100' and have no problem getting getting light loaves with open crumb. My starter is from King Arthur and is about 7 years old, but I don't think that really matters.


If you show us your breads, your formula, and some pics, maybe we can help.



Michael

wassisname's picture
wassisname

I second Michael's opinion.  I'm at 4500' and it doesn't seem to bother the bread.  Scour this site and you will find the missing piece of the puzzle!


Marcus

breadinquito's picture
breadinquito

Hi, Quito, where I live is at almost 9000 feet of altitude but is not an obstacle....wonder if you tried to encrease the percentage of water...happy baking. Paolo

baker daniel's picture
baker daniel

Thanks for the advice.  It IS quite puzzling, but baking is a science.  I will try a few more things.  I really thought that the altitude may have been the problem, but it appears that it is not from your posts.  Back to the drawing board, or oven!

baker daniel's picture
baker daniel

I usually don't measure the amount of flour and kinda feel the dough...I use about 3/4c starter, bread flour, whole wheat flour, water, 1 packet of yeast, about 2 tsp. of salt and sugar.  I discontinued using baking soda since it appeared that it really did not help matters.  Ideas?