The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

oatmeal instead of cornmeal or bran for NYT method?

beanfromex's picture
beanfromex

oatmeal instead of cornmeal or bran for NYT method?

Good morning everyone.

I have my loaf of NYT method bread in the oven using bran. I have used cornmeal and in a pinch polenta.

I made a double batch of dough and am considering using oatmeal for the next loaf...

Has anyone here used anything else,)

I have pictures to post or pizza from a few nights ago, Floyd's recipe which is my all time favorite. I will try and get that done sometime today.

Be well everyone

Larry Sims's picture
Larry Sims

I generally use cornmeal, since that is what I have on hand, and it works fine.  I have made several with just flour dusting - heavily - and they worked, too.  My problem is I live at 6,000 feet elevation with dry desert air, so the mix is not right for this altitude.  I keep varying the mix, times, etc., and I get delicious breads, but no big holes (which I want) and no tall rise.  I actually found this site this AM by searching for high altitude artisan bread ideas, but so far I have not found anything I haven't tried.  The dutch oven baking trick is pretty neat, and I really like the crust you get that way, but I think tossing it in the pan, even gently, deflates it too much.  Try spraying it with water and then grated Parmeggiano. . . (the water makes the Parmesan stick better).

beanfromex's picture
beanfromex

Hello Larry,

 and thank you for the response.

I live at sea level, so I cannot helpwith the high altitude conversions, but I will try flour next time, thanks for the tip.

It appears thaperhaps youandI are the only ones still experimenting with this method.

 Welcome and be well. 

 

Larry Sims's picture
Larry Sims

Could be.  I read most of the stuff around this story (NYT) and have done quite a bit of experimenting.  I do like the crust with this method!  And tonight, all things going well. . ., I will do my next "variable" which will be a smaller diameter pan to force it to go up and not out.  I watched the video from the Martha Stewart TV show, and the bread they produced was pretty flat!  Re: cornmeal, oatmeal, etc., seems one of the posts said something about putting the cornmeal or whatever in a pieplate rather than a towel and that way avoiding some of the sticking problem (lightly covering the top with more meal or flour and a cloth or plastic I assume).  Keep cookin'!

beanfromex's picture
beanfromex

I actually mix a double batch, and keep it in the fridge overnight ( I live in the tropics). I then pat it down. fold it, cover it with oiled plastic wrap and let it come to room temp.

I then remove it from the oiled bowls using a spatula..no messy cloths to deal with.  I put the cornmeal or bran directly into the scrotching hot enamel pan just before "pouring" the bread dough in. I then sprinkle more cornmeal or bran on the top.

I use a 4 qt enamel pot,if my memory serves me well and I double up the batch. It produces a much higher loaf, better for sandwiches.  After doubling the batch, I will never go back to single batches again.

I will do a flour and oatmeal tester next time and let you know how it works out.

I also LOVE the crust on this bread. That type of crust does not exist here, so I am very happy with the results. 

 Good luck with your future experiments... 

Larry Sims's picture
Larry Sims

Last night I got a really nice loaf!  Two things:  much cooler initial ferment time (in my pantry at about 55 degrees, instead of room temp, 24 hours more or less) and a smaller pan - 7 inch diameter by 5 inches high.  I think I was allowing my dough to completely exhaust itself before, so that there was nothing left for the final proof.  I also carefully stretched and folded every 15 to 20 minutes for a couple of hours rather than just letting it sit on a floured cloth.  (Both the cooler ferment time and the stretch and fold business came from wandering around this site!)  That gave me more of a "ball" shape when it went in the pan.  I used only flour on this loaf.  It came out 7 inches in diameter and about 4 high, with a not-too-thick, crispy crust, and a wonderful holey, moist and tender, but chewy interior, with great, altho not complex, flavor.  It did take a long time to brown - it was 50 minutes!!! at 500 degrees covered, and 10 open.  I'm guessing the small free air space in the pan kept it pretty moist in there, which also allowed the wonderful high spring.  I have discovered that this dough is too sticky and soft to slash with a knife, so I use wet scissors, two or three deep cuts.  It swelled up completely round, with only faint scars from the cuts.  I started another one tonight; we'll see if I can repeat tomorrow.  Then it is on to semolina and sesame (see the NYT long string of posts, with a photo), Parmeggiano grated on top, and whatever else comes to mind.  This really is too much fun!  Altho I should not be eating this much bread. . .  I had thought about doubling the recipe, but I wanted to get a good loaf first - and it is fun to have it really really fresh!