The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Superb sandwich bread, perfected honey wheat sourdough, luscious brownies, and...PIZZA PIZZA PIZZA!

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odinraider's picture
odinraider

Superb sandwich bread, perfected honey wheat sourdough, luscious brownies, and...PIZZA PIZZA PIZZA!

Here is the white sandwich bread from Julia Child's Baking with Master Chefs. I made one pan loaf and one small round. It is a great white bread that my girls love. It does not have the integrity of the Jamaican hard do, but it is rich in flavor and texture.



Next up is the honey wheat sourdough I have been working on. It is still too warm to slice, so I can't be sure of the crumb, but it is nice and firm, has good lift, and a great smell.


Once I am sure of the crumb and taste, I will post the recipe.



 


Here are some moist, rich, and chewy double chocolate brownies.



 


And finally, one of my family's favorites: Pizza! Pizza in all its simplicity: sauce, cheese, fresh basil and oregano, and pepperoni on one of them.



 


Tomorrow will bring baguettes and focaccia.

Comments

chetc's picture
chetc

can you post the pizza dough recipe, it looks great, is this an overnight dough in the fridge ect, makes me hungary and it's only breakfast time.


 


  Chet

odinraider's picture
odinraider

As a breakfast food, too. All the essential food groups are present, right?

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

Nice bread, hope you give recipes. The pizza is awesome and the brownies too but I tried not to look at them...trying to quit the sweets :o) Hope you give the pizza recipe too.

odinraider's picture
odinraider

The recipe has been added. I will give the recipe for the wheat bread and the results of the baguettes in an addendum to this post.

belfiore's picture
belfiore

You've had a busy weekend! Everything looks great and I am also interested in your pizza recipe.


Did you bake your pizza in the oven & if so, at what temperature and did yo use a baking stone?


Thanks for sharing such great pictures!


Toni

odinraider's picture
odinraider

I like little more than having the time to devote to baking and spending time with my family. I have a ton of papers to grade by next week, so I am still having a busy weekend (the wife is wagging her finger even now for me to return to that task).


I do use a baking stone, but I think this could be done on a tray lined with parchment. Maybe one large pizza on a full cookie sheet? The only problem there would be less crust, and that's the family's favorite part. I fear if I tried it I would start a revolt.

Noor13's picture
Noor13

We are having Ramadan so I am fasting the whole day but your post makes me really hungry too :)


Beautiful things you made there


 

odinraider's picture
odinraider

I don't intend to challenge your faith, but temptation is good, right? It keeps you strong!

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Your house must have had some wonderful aroma's!


Sylvia

odinraider's picture
odinraider

It smells like bread all weekend. Best air freshener ever!

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Your pizza looks awesome!  They must sold out in a minute!!!  Very nice!!!


teketeke

odinraider's picture
odinraider

They go quickly.

odinraider's picture
odinraider

Due to overwhelming requests, here is the pizza recipe:


Flour: 450 grams


Water: 360 grams


Salt: 9 grams


Yeast: 8 grams


First, heat your oven with a stone in. If you don't have a stone, try this on a sheet pan. I have not, but it would probably yield good results.


Turn the oven to 500 degrees with your stone in. I have two stones, so I position them on the bottom rack and the second to top rack. If you use one stone, put it on the bottom rack. While the oven is heating, mix the dough.


Combine 8 grams of dry yeast with 360 grams of water to dissolve. Mix 9 grams of salt (we use gray sea salt, but use whatever you normally do; if it is a large grain salt, crush it before adding it to the flour to help it dissolve) into 450 grams of bread flour in your stand mixer (you may be able to do this by hand, but I would not want to try).


Add the water-yeast mixture, and mix to form a dough. Once the flour is all incorporated, turn the mixer to high and mix with the dough hook 10 minutes. Transfer to a bowl greased with olive oil, cover with plastic wrap (or a towel), and proof for one hour.


Remove onto a floured surface, and divide the dough in half. The dough is quite soft and extensible, much like ciabatta. form into pizza rounds. Let it rise on parchment paper for about five minutes. Coat the dough with about a half tablespoon of olive oil, then one cup of tomato sauce. You can use your favorite, or make your own. When we buy it, we get Red Gold. Add just under a half pound (one small block) shredded mozzarella (or provolone), then top with fresh basil and oregano.


Bake the pizza on the hot stone for 4 minutes, then rotate and bake another 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and let it cool 10 minutes. This is important!


Cut and enjoy.


If you use the two stone method to bake both at once, switch positions when you rotate the pizzas.

chetc's picture
chetc

  What kind of flour, all purpose or bread flour ect...


 


 


   Chet

odinraider's picture
odinraider

Chet,


I use King Arthur, like many others on this site, due to its consistantly high quality. The pizza is made with bread flour, but could also be made with the Sir Lancelot high gluten flour.


-Matt

camima00's picture
camima00

Hi,

I made the pizza dough this morning following the ingredients with the gram weight info.  I live in the US where the measurements are ounces.  I have a food scale that can convert to grams, so I used that.  I found when I used the gram measurements that my dough was wetter (sticky) than usual for a pizza dough.  I now have it fermenting in the refrigerator.  Is the dough suppose to be sticky?  Should I have added more flour?  I want to make my pizza tomorrow.  Will it still rise in the refrigerator overnight? 

 

Update:

I made my pizza.  The outer crust rose slightly, but my crust was too hard for my husband's liking.  My dough was very hard to work with, being it was very sticky.  Should it be that sticky?

 

odinraider's picture
odinraider

I live in the U.S., too. I use grams because they are much more precise than ounces. As for the dough, it really only needs one hour to ferment. If you want to leave it overnight, I would recommend cutting the yeast to 1/4 what is called for, or 2 grams. That way it can do a nice, slow rise in the fridge and not run out of food.

Your dough should be quite tacky, that is, stick lightly to your hands. I use either a little flour or water on my hands to keep it off. This will make it easier to work with. The type of flour you're using and reletive humidity will play a part in the wettness. You certainly can add more flour, but if you do, I would caution against adding too much. Think the consistancy of ciabatta. This recipe is much wetter than most pizza doughs, which is one reason it developes a lot of flavor and gluten without the need for a long fermentation period.

It should be handled lightly. Don't try to form perfect shapes. Just stretch it out a little at a time, and keep the counter under it (and your hands) lightly floured. It almost required the use of parchment paper on a peel, but I have gotten them onto the stone with just a bit of flour, semolina, corn meal, etc. on the board. I will see if the family is in the mood for pizza this week, and will make an instruction video (long in the promise, yet to be fulfilled) to show all the processes.

Matt

camima00's picture
camima00

It would be very helpful to see a video showing all the processes of your pizza dough.  It looks so good.  I am just starting out making pizza dough.  I have made other pizza dough recipes, all of them not quite coming out like yours with the cornicione crust.  That's what I am trying to accomplish.  Hope to see your video soon.  I will keep checking from time to time for it.

 

Thank you for your very informative website.

 

 

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

For a home mixer, such as a KitchenAide, high speed equivalent would usually be speed 2.  Low speed equivalent would usually be speed 1. 

Paul

camima00's picture
camima00

So, I should use speed 2 to knead the pizza dough for 10 minutes?  Is that fast enough for kneading? 

camima00's picture
camima00

I have a 10-speed Kitchen Aid stand mixer (wattage 325).  On your instructions it says to turn mixer on high and mix dough for 10 minutes.  Does that mean I am to mix dough on speed 10 of my mixer?  That seems too fast.  What speed do you use to mix your dough for 10 minutes?

odinraider's picture
odinraider

Sorry; I've been away for a while. High speed on a Kitchenaid should be speed 8 or 10. Remember, this is an 80% hydration dough. It does not overtax the mixer. At least not mine. I have the Artisan model, and it is about 15 years old. Still works fine after many years of high speed mixing. 

The dough starts out kind of soupy, and the faster mixing speed is, if not necessary, a huge time saver. You can acchieve the same results at speed 2, if you mix for 18 - 25 minutes.

If you don't want to run your KA ten minutes on those high settings, an alternative would be to use your paddle attachment for the first four or five minutes on speed 4 (keep it on speed 1 until the flour is mixed in, or your kitchen will be redecorated in powder white), then switch to the hook and finish up on the higher speed.

Matt

camima00's picture
camima00

Thanks for your reply.  I really want to get it right.  I am having problems trying to stretch the dough to the size I want.  I'm trying to get an airy crust, and every time I stretch the dough it just comes back.  How do I get the dough to cooperate?  When my pizza is done baking, the outside crust seems too dense.

Any suggestions?

odinraider's picture
odinraider

I really am working on a video to show the technique, but until then, you need a small amount of flour on the counter. Dump the dough on the floured counter, and cut it in half. Turn the cut side up. Take opposite sides of the dough and stretch it, turning it onto the cut side to seal it up. Pat it gently down.

Now you essentially pich up one side of the dough and flick it like a sheet. A little at a time. If the dough is snapping back, cover it and let it rest for about ten minutes. then go back to it.

The other technique is to pick the dough up and let the weight of the dough stretch it over your hand. Turn it slowly to stretch it evenly.

Once you have the dough thin enough, you can make a bigger crust by brushing off all the flour, then use a little water around the edge to make the dough sticky. fold and pinch the dough about 1/2 inch around the outer rim of the pizza. Now you have a crust! Generally I don't do this step. If the dough is the right thickness, the edge will get a fair amount of oven spring.

Matt

camima00's picture
camima00

Thank you for the tips.  It helps a great deal.  Tonight I made pizzas and the crust had holes but not as big as yours.  I didn't know how that you had to place cut side up to shape it.  Next time I will try that.  My husband still liked the pizza crust was anyway.  I think the reason why it had smaller holes was the fact that I baked them on a metal pizza pan, maybe?  Next time I will try it on a pizza stone.   Each pizza I make seems to be a little better than the last one.

I am looking forward to seeing your video.  It will be a tremendous help to see each step in making a ciabatta-like pizza. 

 

 

 

 

odinraider's picture
odinraider

I have a set of four videos now available.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/29315/pizza-videos-are

odinraider's picture
odinraider

Here's the rest of what I did.


Honey wheat sourdough


Sponge:


100 grams recently fed 100% hydration starter


100 grams water


150 grams whole wheat flour


Mix well, knead by hand for a minute, then transfer to a bowl. Cover, and let sit at room temperature for an hour. Refrigerate overnight.


The next morning (12-14 hours later), remove it and let it come to room temperature, for about three hours.


Bread dough:


350 grams (all) wheat starter sponge


300 grams whole wheat (originally this was supposed to be white wheat, but I ran out, so I used red wheat)


250 grams bread flour


300 grams water


50 grams honey


15 grams salt


Break up the sponge in the water, then add to the flours and salt. Mix on speed six with a dough hook for six minutes, or by hand until it becomes a smooth, firm dough that is slightly tacky to the touch. Ferment three to four hours in an oiled covered container, then shape however you want. I chose a bread pan to make a sandwich loaf. Cover and proof for one and a half to two hours.


Bake in a preheated oven at 375 degrees for 40 minutes. The crust should be smooth and dark, and a thermometer should read 205 degrees. Remove from pan to a cooling rack, and allow to cool completely before devouring.


It has a nice, rich sweet wheaty flavor that melts into a mildly sour tickle at the end.



 


And finally, baguettes again. Almost perfect this time. The focaccia will have to wait until we have reduced this surplus of goodies.


teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hello, Matt!


Thank you for sharing this great recipe! In fact, I tried this once before, but that was totally a failure because I was using BLEACHED FLOUR. How ignorant I was! I almost killed my starter too. I have fed my starter BLEACHED FLOUR for 2 days!


A week later, today, I tried again and I finally got a good result! What a wonderful bread! They are not sour at all. That was what I was looking for. I didn't put them in a refrigerator, I placed them in the basement  for 9 hours.( tempareture was around at 69F) and I didn't have a time to proof more than 40 minutes so that I shaped them into batard. They were burst but they were very tasty. 



 


Thank you again, Matt! Next time I will use a loaf pan. :)


ーーーーNext day-------


I realized that these bread were tough. It was good when I ate it yesterday. I think that they were underprooved.  Next time I better have a plan to have enough time for proof before baking.


Best wishes,


 


Akiko

odinraider's picture
odinraider

Akiko,


Yes, they are underproofed. Your crumb is a bit tighter than it should be.


The bread, if stored in a bag, should stay soft a few days. I was eating the remnants of a loaf five days later (stored in an air-tight plastic bread bag), and it was still soft(ish).


They do look good, though. You do a great job with scoring and promoting oven spring. I like the idea of letting the loaves ferment in a basement, but my cats have the run of mine. I fear any dough to go down those dark steps would never return to the kitchen.


I do look forward to the day when I have a farmhouse with a cellar. Sausages and cheese and canned goods (and now, bread dough) will abound then.


-Matt

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Thank you for the information, Matt.  


 I see, They were underproofed as I knew. The dough were not ready to go in the oven because they were as not puffy as I usually see for the dough are ready to bake.


I wanted to put the loaves in some plastic bags before going to bed. but they were still warm, so I left them in the  kitchen over night. That was another bad idea. I usually put  bread that I bake in air-tight plastic bags and keep them in a freezer. In addition to preserve food,I do keep peeled some gloves of garlic and white eggs in a ziplog in freezer too.  I also soak some ginger in a container with water and keep in a refrigerator. I change the water every a couple days. 


I love to keep my starter in a cold place instead of putting in a refrigerator too. Your idea that have a farmhouse with cellar is a great idea, Matt!


I will try again, Thank you! Matt


Best wishes,


Akiko

teketeke's picture
teketeke

odinraider,


I made your pizza today, and that was a big hit!  Thank you so much.


This pizza reminds me of crispy pizza that I ate at a restaurant "Chianti" in Ginza, Tokyo, Japan. The pizza dough was extremely think but the flavor was the same.  I was amazed how sweet the dough was without sugar. I liked the texture too. I keep this recipe definitely.


 



I couldn't get such a moist crumb like you had on the picture though. Would you mind telling me about the water temperature? I used cold water.



Regards,


teketeke

odinraider's picture
odinraider

Teketeke,


Yes, the crust is quite nicely flavored, if I do say so myself. It took quite a bit of trial and error to create this, so I do most sincerely appreciate the compliments.


I use lukewarm water. You may need to add a bit more, depending on humidity and the flour. Try adding a teaspoon more at a time. Also, you want to be sure the oven is blazing hot. That helps with the dough's spring, although yours looks very nice and light. Your first go looks like a great success. I am glad I could share this with you.


-Matt

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Matt,


I am so happy to get this information from you. Thank you, Thank you ....


My family really loved your pizza. " That was the best pizza you ever made!" my husband and my son said. I will continue to make it again :) 


Next time, LUKE WARM WATER...  and so on...   I got it!! 


Happy baking and thank you again !!!


Akiko

odinraider's picture
odinraider

Akiko,


You may want to handle the dough gently when forming the pizza, too. Notice mine are not a perfect circle or rectangle. I pat the dough gently, then pick it up and stretch it to the right size. Overworking it might also contribute to the slightly less airy crumb. You may be degassing it too much.


I am happy to give you a treat for your family. Mine loves it as well. If I tried to make any other, I would fear for my safety. That's how serious they are about it.


You are most welcome. I will continue to post new recipes as I perfect them, and I may be open to specific requests.


-Matt

chetc's picture
chetc

What kind of flour????


 


    Chet

odinraider's picture
odinraider

It is only a small blurb in the instructions, but I do mention that it is bread flour. More specifically, King Arthur bread flour.


 

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Matt,


Thank you for another great infomation.


Yes, I was patting and stretching the dough too much.  This is like handling a french bread dough!!   I can't wait until I make it again.


And, I am looking forward to seeing your new recipes!!


Happy baking :)


Akiko

odinraider's picture
odinraider

I will be travelling to an Amish store soon, and I will buy some bulks of different flours (high gluten, course mill, semolina, etc.), so I expect to come up with some new recipes in the next month. I will certainly share them with all of you.


-M

tempe's picture
tempe

Everything looks so awesome!! I am defnitely going to have a go at your Honey Wheat Sourdough, will post results. Wish the newbie luck!!!

odinraider's picture
odinraider

Wish you the best of luck. Your success means my recipe is good. I like multiple test results, so definelty let me know how it comes out.


-Matt

odinraider's picture
odinraider

about the pizza dough: it makes great breadsticks. Oil the dough after stretching it, then use a garlic press (or you can finely mince it) to smash a few cloves into a small amount (about a half a cup) of shredded provelone and parmasen cheese. Mix it up, and sprinkle that on top the dough and bake as usual. Goes a treat with pasta, or as a sandwich with pepperoni or salami trapped between a couple slabs of it.


-M

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Matt,


This is another great tip, isn't ?  My kids love breadsticks, so do I. I will come here to report you when I make it again. :)  


Happy baking,


Akiko

tempe's picture
tempe

Honey Wholewheat came up beautifully! What a delicious loaf, great flavour.  I had no problems at any point with your recipe, thoroughly enjoyed making this loaf, thanks Matt for a great recipe.  I didn't bake mine in a loaf tin but shaped it into a batard, it didn't rise as much as yours but was still good.

odinraider's picture
odinraider

That is absolutely beautiful! Congrats, and good job. I may make it without a loaf pan next time, because your scored crust looks very nice.


-Matt

hanxiriel's picture
hanxiriel

I tried yours tonight and they turned out great!!! Airy, big holes, light and tasty! The only addition is 100% hydration sourdough (about 2 tbsp). I make ciabatta using your recipe! They are better than any ciabatta I ever tried in TFL! Thank you!


 



 



 



This recipe is a keeper for sure! Thank you!

odinraider's picture
odinraider

That looks amazing! Good job. I am so glad you like the recipe. I also add a bit of sourdough from time to time, especially when I put the pizza on the grill.


I am going to use the to make some chicken bacon club pizzas sometime soon, since Donato's does not sell them anymore. I think that they will be better then theirs, anyway.


Have you tried this dough for breadsticks? It is great. Doing some tonight with Chicken Parmesan.


Matt

hanxiriel's picture
hanxiriel

Hi.


 


So is it possible to halved the dough and get those nice bubbles?


How to store the unused dough in the fridge/freezer?


 


Thanks.

hanxiriel's picture
hanxiriel

Thanks! I like shaping them into ciabatta since your dough really does produce big holes! they are the best ciabatta I've ever made! I have baby sourdough in the fridge. Will make more bread tomorrow. I don't like breadstick much, but I will give it a try anyway.


I am aiming to make Norweigian Sourdough soon...frankly, I am afraid it will not turn out real good (had too many bad experience in bread making). Wish me luck!  :D

odinraider's picture
odinraider

I've never made a half batch, but I imagine it would work. Experimentation is a good thing. Let me know the results.


 


The "breadsticks" are essentially a batch cooked like ciabatta, but with some topping. Then slice it into long, thin pieces. The one I made yesterday had a rosemary garlic infused olive oil and parmesan cheese topping.


 


I have a few pounds of spelt. Maybe next weekend I'll get some rye and try a loaf of the Norwegian, too.

alabubba's picture
alabubba

Made this last night, It turned out fantastic. Crispy and Chewy! Open crumb. Really very good. Next time I think I will try an overnight fermentation to obtain more flavor.


I would post crumb shots, but it was eaten before I got the chance, But it was just like all the others in this thread. Very ciabatta like and just a delish.


Thank you so much for the recipe.


allan


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