The Fresh Loaf

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40% Rye With-out caraway

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Mebake's picture
Mebake

40% Rye With-out caraway

This is Baked from hamelman's 40% Rye with caraway, only without caraway seeds as my wife dislikes them in bread





I found this recipe to yield a smewheat tangy bread, so it would have been better complimented eith caraway seeds. The crust was chewy, and the crumb light and even textured, i'd say very good result with no folds done, and very short fermentation time.


I'd bake it again, with caraway added.


Khalid

Comments

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

If your wife doesn't care for the taste of caraway (mine isn't fond of it either), try using either fennel seed or dill seed in its place.  Both play very nicely with the flavor of the rye.


Paul

Mebake's picture
Mebake

thanks paul! I'll surely try that


khalid

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I love caraway in mine!  Must be the Irish in me..I also like caraway in my sodabread.


Sylvia

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks Sylvia! I love caraway in mine too, mind you, but it falls out of favor for my wife.

arlo's picture
arlo

Great looking looks Khalid, I too love to bake that loaf but without the caraway. I feel the rye gives enough flavor.


On the other hand, Paul's suggestion of dill is like a ground breaking moment for me! I love dill, and I love rye! Why haven't I thought to combine them!


A local baker here in my town often bakes a lower percentage rye with dill and havarti cheese, quite delicious, perhaps thats another idea for this loaf!

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, arlo!

wally's picture
wally

and crumb, Mebake!  I like the looks and texture of your 40% rye very much.


Larry

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, larry! its sourness melows in time, but the main concern i found about this bread, is that it stales or hardens quickly if left out.


khalid

wassisname's picture
wassisname

That looks fantastic!  Very nice bread, as usual.


 


Marcus

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, marcus! I praise your endeavor to bake wholegrains

Noor13's picture
Noor13

Well done Khalid.


I think your loafs look delicious


I personally love Caraway but you could also try other seeds like above mentioned. I think Rye cries out for something to complement the flavor.

asicign's picture
asicign

I also made this bread last week.  Interestingly enough, my wife also does not like caraway seeds.  But I think a rye needs caraway, so I used them and the bread turned out great. (sorry, no pics).  My wife will have to wait for the next batch.  I haven't noticed this bread getting stale.  I just finished a loaf this morning.


Andy

rayel's picture
rayel

Your 40% rye looks wonderful. Was the rest (60%) high gluten flour, or all purpose? Your bread has a lovely crumb, and are decorated nicely with (Poppy ?) and sesame. The flavor must be excellent with the sour dough culture. How large a mixer do you use? Nice pictures.  Ray

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, Noor!


Andy, it turns out that mine has staled or rather hardened because it has been slightly toasted out of the fridge.


Thanks, Ray! the 60% was Bread flour with 12.9% protein. And yes, that is Poppy seeds and sesame. As to the mixer, i don't own one, i Knead by hand using richard bertinent's "slap and fold:, it seems to develop gluten well for 65% hydration and above doughs. My dough weighed 3 lb  as in hamelman's recipe, good for 2 large loaves.


khalid

rayel's picture
rayel

Thanks Khalid.  The other day as the machine was whirling along, the dough defiantly would not come together. The moment I spilled the shapeless contents on my board, and began handling the dough, with wet hands, barely kneading it, it all came together as wet as it was. This has happened before, and I think nothing comes close to hands on.  Ray

Salaheldin's picture
Salaheldin

good looking loafes khalid..... I cannot find rye in Egypt, do you have any idea what it is called here?


 


thanks

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Too True, Ray! I found that you miss most of the fun when you use a machine to handle your dough.


Salaheddin, Hi! Though i don't live in egypt, i can tell you where you might get your hands on one, try Spinneyes, or any world famous supermarket chain. Rye in arabic is called: "Jawodar".


Khalid

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Khalid,


Great breads as ever.   I took some time to get to like caraway seeds in bread.   I'm with you these days: definitely a taste worth acquiring.


Meantime, for your family, Paul's idea of fennel may be a good alternative.   That is also a very strong flavour, but maybe more to their taste?


Best wishes


Andy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, andy! i'am flattered! it means a lot coming from you!


I will try fennel, whole or ground?


Khalid

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

I just mix them in whole, like I would the caraway, Khalid.  Haven't tried toasting them yet, per Andy's suggestion, but that has possibilities, too.


Paul

ananda's picture
ananda

...I guess


Whole will not colour your crumb, and would be my preference.


Just depends how much you like fennel perhaps?


Maybe dry roast them in a skillet then cool them before you add to the dough?


BW


Andy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

I will try with roasting, and without when i make this recipe next.


Thanks Andy!


khalid

sphealey's picture
sphealey

Although I generally like caraway I have gotten a bit tired of it over the years, so I have tried many different seeds in rye bread lately.  Celery seed adds an interesting tang; poppy seed a bit of a toasty flavor, and cumin seed (which I first added by mistake thinking it was caraway) in small amounts a bit of hot pepper-type spiciness.  I finally found black caraway at Penzy's Spices and it is an entirely different flavor from what we call caraway in the US and worth trying too.


sPh

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi


Yes in the UK we would know these as Black Onion Seeds; the local Asian food shops sell them as "kalonji", and they seem to be often referred to as nigella.   I don't think they are related to caraway, but I could be wrong.   Very common in naan breads.


Cumin seeds would be great.   I've also used black cumin, sometimes labelled as "kashmiri jeera" to differentiate from just "jeera".


BW


Andy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

thanks Sphealy, and Andy for your valuable comments. I will try different combination of seeds..


khalid