The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Salt Lake City Sourdough

restever99's picture
restever99

Salt Lake City Sourdough

Hello all,


It has been a while since I posted.  I get moved around the country a lot.  With all that moving comes transporting my starters, always a pain, but worth it because of the new flavors I get in each place I end up.  This is my first batch since moving to Salt Lake City and I want to show it off.  Comments and critique are always welcomed.  Happy kneading!



I dusted one of them with flour to see if I could get the brotform effect considering mine are in storage.


sanchiro's picture
sanchiro

I have attempted sourdough several times and have yet to get things to work out right. I am in Sandy. I don't want to be a pest, er.. uh, well, maybe I do. I know I am just overlooking a critical step or two, and that I could bake some great SD bread with a little guidance.


Any help for a newbie?


sanchiro@gmail.com

MichaelH's picture
MichaelH

What recipe are you using, and what kind of problems are you having?


 

restever99's picture
restever99

hello there.  what kind of problems are you having and what's the formula your using?  then we can find out what to improve upon.  when i was starting out, my loaves were something to be desired.

smarkley's picture
smarkley

I am interested in what MichaelH and restever99 have to say... and I am sure it will be great advice!


But, on this site is a great idea I use all the time for amounts of ingredients with sourdough -- it is the 1 2 3 Sourdough Formula


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/9346/123-easy-formula-sourdough-bread


This is what it says.. a formula for amounts and it works great for me... of course you still need to have a methodology for mixing, kneading, proofing, shaping, baking... etc.


 

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Those are nice looking loaves, restever99!  Looks like your starter weathered the move in good condition.


Your comment about different flavors in different locations is intriguing, especially given the raging debate over a starter's ability to remain "true" to its roots when relocated and fed with different water and flour.  How would you characterize the flavor shifts that you have observed with some of your relocations?


Paul

restever99's picture
restever99

Well I made this starter when I was studying at the CIA, I've had it for so long lets see if I can remember.


(CIA)Hyde Park, NY: Dissapointing first few loaves, eventually developed into something resembling sourdough(I was still a student!)  I kept the original seed culture and reworked it a couple times till I had what I wanted.


Washington, Connecticut: little on the nutty side, with a mild sourness.


Southern California: Bright sour that stayed with you.


New York City:  Very mild sour.


Salt Lake City:  Kinda middle of the road taste, probably needs a little more time to pick up the local yeasts, though I notice my starter is far more active here than anywhere else I've been.  So active I'm afraid it's going to develope a mind of it's own and absorb me while I sleep.  It'll probably settle in a few weeks.


I do know it's possible to maintain cultures to consistently produce the desired flavor and microbes, however it's too much work in my opinion for the home baker.  Though I appreciate the dedication and challenge associated with those who try.


Hope that helps:-)