The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Looking for a supplier of Fresh Yeast

Armin's picture
Armin

Looking for a supplier of Fresh Yeast

I have been baking bread for many years, first with a bread machine, then with the machine used to do the kneading, and now I knead the dough from scratch.  However I am unable to find a supply of fresh, the type that comes in a block like tofu does.  I have seen it used in England recently, but am unable to find a supplier in or near Toronto in Canada.  Anybody can give me tips on finding a supplier of Fresh Yeast, if it is organic it would be even better.  Armin

Kent's picture
Kent

You can get it from New York Bakers. Do not know what shipping would be.


 


http://www.nybakers.com/leaven.html

Susan Lynn's picture
Susan Lynn

Fresh yeast will be available in Toronto ... sometimes whole-food markets or health-food stores will carry it. Or you could ask at a bakery and if they use it, they might sell you some. Frankly, I don't think it's worth the effort ... it goes bad quickly although you could cut a block (usually comes as a pound block) into the size of piece you would use per batch, wrap them and freeze them. I tried it once, but only once. Right now I'm working for an artisan bakery which produces some of the best bread I've ever had ... from sourdough starter and/or plain old instant yeast.

lynnebiz's picture
lynnebiz

I used to buy fresh yeast from a local wholesale bakery. I used to break it up & freeze it, but it would last at the most, about a month.


I moved a few cities away and didn't feel it was worth the drive - since then I switched to instant, which I buy at Costco (or another big-box store we have around here). Frozen, it keeps a couple of years, but I give some away to my kids now.


My sourdough starters have been dismal failures, so I decided not to frustrate myself further with that!


To Armin:


I'm curious - is there any reason you prefer fresh yeast? Just wondering if there is a benefit that I wasn't aware of (not that it would get me to drive the couple of towns over, lol. I hate driving, and gas is too $$ these days).

foodslut's picture
foodslut

If I can find fresh yeast in northern Ontario, you should be able to find it in Toronto with zero problem (if a bakery won't sell it, ask where they buy it).


Still, have to agree with SL on this one - I've baked with both fresh yeast (learned to bake with it, in fact), and I use instant yeast now because it's way easier to store and I don't notice a difference in the product.


Happy hunting!

Armin's picture
Armin

Hi Susan Lynn


I find that dry yeast works fine, but recently I learned from a friend in England how to make bread not in a machine but by kneading it by hand and with fresh yeast, which produced a nice loaf.  I find that my hand kneaded loafs are as dense as a German rye loaf, even if I use instead of two teaspoons of yeast as much as 4.5 spoons.  Why does the kneading proces seem to require so much more yeast?  Armin

lynnebiz's picture
lynnebiz


I find that dry yeast works fine, but recently I learned from a friend in England how to make bread not in a machine but by kneading it by hand and with fresh yeast, which produced a nice loaf.  I find that my hand kneaded loafs are as dense as a German rye loaf, even if I use instead of two teaspoons of yeast as much as 4.5 spoons.  Why does the kneading proces seem to require so much more yeast? 



(I'm not Susan Lynn, but I have to chime in. Besides, my name is close enough. ;D)


No, Armin - you're mistaken here. I can tell you this not just from everything I've read, but from my own experience, since I've been making bread by hand since I was about 14 yrs old.


i'm 57 right now - you do the math (it's too scary for me to look at all those years, lol).


I don't have any experience with rye, but I'm sure that others with the experience will chime in & help you. I will say, though, that you'll find that your loaves will improve with experience - bread making is both art and science.


Honestly, I don't even spend a lot of time kneading anymore - I let time do most of the work. After I tried the no knead methods that are all over the internet, I understood a bit more about dough. Sometimes I'll combine the two methods - I'll knead it a bit, then let it rest longer than I usually would for a kneaded bread, but not the half a day that I'd use for the no-knead method (using the small amt of yeast called for in the no knead method), and that works, too. This helps when I'm desperate for bread!


I tried using Peter Reinhart's method with whole wheat once, and I got a terrific loaf.  What he does is eliminate the yeast in the beginning, for instance, the poolish, or whatever method he chooses. He finds that he ends up with a better tasting bread, with better texture. I highly recommend his book, "Whole Grain Breads: New Techniques, Extraordinary Flavor."


Good luck - and believe me, this is the best forum on the net to learn all you can about read!


Lynne


edit: I just reread your post and realize you are not trying to make a rye loaf - sorry about that! I would suggest that you look up the stretch & fold method on this board, with the search method. It's far easier & gives terrific results.

firehazard's picture
firehazard

well, rye bread does not need lots of kneading anyway.


rye does not have the glue you have to work out.


i'm german and i bake lots of bread and also rye bread. made one this night and ended here on this board because i where looking if the US has fresh yeast.


 


the trick with the rye bread dough is the raising time. 2 tea spoon of dry yeast seems to be fine for about 800 - 900 GRAMMS of flour, lukewarm water, no cold wind (A/C off or putting the dough after under an plastic bowl)and the 2nd raisingtime has to be about 2 hours to 2 hours.


most rye breads still contain in germany some  1/4 of wheet (white flour) we love mixed flour bread a lot.


100% rye bread is pretty heavy.


it really does not need more yeast, just longer raising time because of the heavyness of this flour.


 


hope that helps


sonja

ehymes's picture
ehymes

I have been buying block yeast at Whole Foods.  They bake their own bread and use the fresh yeast, at least at the Whole Foods in Portland Maine.


It is not out for sale but, if I ask for a small piece they usually give me a whole brick of it.  However, it does freeze well and comes alive quickly when I need it.  I had one block for a year and it still came alive and did its thing.


So, if you do not have Whole Foods near you, try any supermarket that has a bread baking section.


Good Luck


Ed

amauer's picture
amauer

They stopped carrying it here about 15 to 20 years ago as it goes bad fast and not many Americans bake bread. I don't see a big difference, I have been fine with the instant dry. I like SAF yeast the best. I like the idea of asking at a bakery, I may just do that to try it out again. Andrea

grind's picture
grind

I can't remember if Toronto has Superstores or Real Canadian Superstores.  It's the President's Choice people.  They always have an in store bakery and they'll sell it to customers if you ask a baker at the back where the ovens are.  Really cheap, like a buck fifty.

AbbyHa's picture
AbbyHa

Anna's Bakery sells fresh yeast for $4 per pound. 

 2394 Bloor St. W (near Jane subway station), Toronto, Ontario

(416)769-8065

There are several other pastry and deli stores along Bloor St W (between Jane and Runnymede)  that also sell fresh yeast.  These are sold in 100 g packages ($0.99).

Riviera Bakery Ltd also sells fresh yeast.  They will sell $1 worth or you can buy a brick size  for $5

576 College St (near Manning Ave;  in Little Italy)

(416) 537-3465

(416)537-9352