The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Oven temperature for fan oven

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Druidswife's picture
Druidswife

Oven temperature for fan oven

I am new to bread making and have been using a breadaker for the first stage. The results, however, have been disappointing so I am going to try your basic recipe and do it from scratch.


Please could you tell me whether the temperature stated in the recipe is for a conventional or fan oven and if it is better to bake the bread in either a conventional or fan oven.


Thanks 

Comments

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Most temperatures are stated for a conventional oven as the norm.  Fan ovens should be set lower if the temp is not given.  I would bake without the fan if the loaf isn't covered. 


If you don't mind me asking... which basic recipe are we talking about?


Mini

Druidswife's picture
Druidswife

The basic recipe I was referring to is one that is given on this website in the section entitled 'Your first loaf' :)

holds99's picture
holds99

In my previous home I had a set of full size Kitchen Aid double-ovens (over and under), each of which could be operated in either standard or convection mode.  I found that baking in convection mode (in the 350-450 deg. range) required a reduction of between 20-25 deg. in oven temperature.  Simply put, a convection oven operates more efficiently than a standard oven as a result of the air circulation within the oven.


Howard   


Edit: Sorry, I completely misunderstood your question.  Having never heard of a "fan oven" I assumed you were asking about a convection oven. 

copyu's picture
copyu

I had a small, but very efficient one in Australia, where they were often referred to as "fan-forced" ovens. I'm pretty sure it's the same beast as a 'convection' oven and your temp-reduction advice for such an oven is close enough to perfect (in Fahrenheit degrees!)


Cheers,


copyu

holds99's picture
holds99

Copyu,


Thanks for explaining "forced fan" ovens and for clarifying (which I should have done) that I was referring to Fahrenheit temperature.  Now i understand the term "fan oven". 


Best regards,


Howard

Bee18's picture
Bee18

I think that to bake bread in a fan oven you should bake it covered as Mini said. the best is probably the Dutch oven idea. A cast iron pot with a lid is good for that. I f you bake un covered the bread will dry when it need to be baked with humidity.


Good luck, Bea

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I'm posting the link for further conversation:


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/lessons/yourfirstloaf


If the loaf is covered, the fan oven can be set at a higher temp like 220 to 240 and then reduced after the first 10-15 minutes.  Easier just to set it at 190°C or with fan 175°C or 180°C.  What ever is easier for you.  Some Digital ovens switch automatically when the oven is first set with normal times and temp and then changed to fan.  They adjust shortening the time and lowering the temp.


Mini

Franchiello's picture
Franchiello

the recipes I've used recommend that the heat be reduced by 50 degrees (Farenheit) when using convection to bake bread.  I just finished baking 2 loaves about 40 minutes ago and used the convection function of my Kitchenaid range - they turned out beautifully brown and the bake didn't heat the house up like it would have if I'd used the regular oven setting.  Bernard Clayton's book New Complete Book of Breads has the option of using convection for most of the recipes.  I use the regular baking function when I want a more artisanal loaf/crust (and want to warm up the kitchen a little during the winter).

ErikVegas's picture
ErikVegas

I use the convection bake setting for all of my breads.  Combining with the baking stone and a pan of water I get great oven spring and loaves that are evenly browned on all sides without having to move or shift the bread around.  I have noticed that when a formula gives a range for cooking times my breads are usually done an the sooner rather than the later end of the range.  (for example if a formula say bake at 425 for 25-30 min; my breads are almost always done in 25 min.)


Erik

mimifix's picture
mimifix

Greetings,


Our common understanding for converting bake times from conventional to convection baking, is to drop the oven temperature by 25 degrees. However, many companies already compensate for the temperature differential by programming the oven to automatically reduce the setting. So, for example, if a consumer turned on their oven and set it for 350 degrees using the conventional (non-forced air) setting, the thermostat would regulate the oven for 350 degrees. But if the consumer used the convection setting and set the oven for 350 degrees, the thermostat would automatically regulate the oven for 325 degrees.


It's important to read your use and care manual, the booklet that comes with your oven. This will explain how yours operates. If you no longer have the manual, find the model number on your appliance and call the company. They should be able to tell you. I worked for Maytag Appliances testing ovens, and having the proper setting can be crucial to your baked goods.


Mimi   www.bakingfix.com

rhomp2002's picture
rhomp2002

I have a countertop oven that has both a convection and a regular capability.   My favorite bread recipe calls for 500F for 10 minutes with spraying the loaf before putting it in and then at 5 minutes and then 10 minutes.  It then calls for lowering to 425F for 15-20.    The baking temperature will only go to 450F.  I find that if I bake the first 10 minutes on convection at 450F and the final 15-20 at regular 425F I get very good oven spring and a good crumb as well - and the bread does not dry out.  Seems that it takes 15-17  at 425F to finish.  Win-win for me.


My other countertop does go to 500F and I do that one at 500F regular for the first 10 and then 425F for the 15-20.   It takes the full 20 minutes and I also get good oven spring and a good crumb.